Free 7 Day Trial RV GPS App RV Trip Planner Campground Reviews RV Maintenance Free 7 Day Trial ×
 


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 10-12-2008, 06:23 PM   #21
Rivet Master
 
SteveH's Avatar
 
2005 39' Land Yacht 390 XL 396
Common Sense , Texas
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 5,319
Quote:
Originally Posted by jump View Post
and found a leak next to the door. the tack strips for the carpet are ruined and will need replacing...


Is this solution something that allows nails, brads or screws to fasten the tack strips for carpeting?
Yes, you can nail into the epoxy soaked wood, but screws into drilled holes would work better.
__________________
Regards,
Steve
SteveH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2008, 11:20 AM   #22
Rivet Master
 
rogerdodger's Avatar
 
1974 Argosy 28
Fresno/Clovis , California
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 701
Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveH View Post
I once had an Argosy that had leaked around the toilet and the particle board floor had turned to mush under the carpet. I too did not want to take the whole trailer apart to fix it, so I figured out another way.

I got some epoxy glue....lots of it...a big package of it...about 8 ounces from the hobby shop. Mixed up the glue, and thinned it with alcohol (a mixture of about 2 parts glue and one part alcohol), and then poured the entire mixture on the bad floor area. The thinned glue will soak into the wood, and make it as strong as steel when it hardens. We used that trailer for several years without any issues with the floor.

Given the same situation again, I would not hesitate to use the epoxy glue.
I have found an area of wood floor under a water pipe, in the rear of my 1981 Excella II, about 2"X8" of soft plywood. Should I apply the epoxy trick, or is this small of an area not worth doing anything to it? The floor is not supporting anything in this area, but is close to the dreaded rear end sag area. The water leak has been repaired.
__________________
Roger
rogerdodger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2008, 11:32 AM   #23
Rivet Master
 
rogerdodger's Avatar
 
1974 Argosy 28
Fresno/Clovis , California
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 701
Instead of pirating this post, I will put my question into a new post.
__________________
Roger
rogerdodger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2008, 08:56 PM   #24
Rivet Master
 
1973 31' Sovereign
Portland , Oregon
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 1,255
Images: 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anniedog View Post
Overlander you have my sympathy. We know where the leaks were and have taken care of them. Fortunately ALL the metal we have found is bright and shiny-no problems at all. Our trailer was owned by an A'Scream fanatic before we bought it from him and he did all sorts of mods etc. to it with regular change/fix/ everything, including "white topping" the roof before the factory offerd it and installing the worlds greatest outside vented catalytic heater, twin automatic Fantastic fans, sliding bathroom door conversion etc.. Am more hopeful we can do this repair on our own.
This type of floor repair should be entirely possible from the top side of the floor. Here are the basic steps that are involved:

1.) Cut out the rotted area - preferably in a shape that is easy to cut a new piece to fit. Remove any screws or elevator bolts that were holding down the part you took out. You can use something like a hacksaw if necessary to cut them off.

2.) Use strips of plywood 4" to 6" wide to attach around the edges of the hole on the bottom side of the remaining floor so that they create a ledge to sit the new floor piece on. I would suggest some good wood glue and screws from above into the plywood strips to attach them. It helps to have a clamp of some sort to hold the strip in place while you put in the screws. The screws only need to be about every 6" or so. The glue will do most of the work. I would use 1-1/2" decking screws.

3.) Cut your new piece of plywood (not OSB) to fit the hole. Apply some wood glue on the ledger that you created in step #2. Insert the patch piece and screw it down.

4.) If the patch crosses over part of the metal frame (and it sounds like yours just might) you can add some self-drilling/self-threading screws through the new plywood into the frame. The kind that I used in replacing my entire floor are shown in the attached photo. I bought them at Home Depot but they would be available other places too. The smaller ones should be long enough.

It also sounds like from your description that for someone that is 70 years old you are not afraid to get involved at least. The steps I have listed above should make sense to anyone that is reasonably handy and are not really that hard to do. So if you can find someone that is generally handy you can have them read this and go to work - that is if you don't feel up to taking it on yourself.

I hope this helps. Also I would be happy to try to answer any questions if you have any.

Malcolm
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	TekScrews 002.jpg
Views:	96
Size:	121.7 KB
ID:	71046  
__________________
Only he who attempts the ridiculous can achieve the impossble.
malconium is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2008, 11:59 PM   #25
2 Rivet Member
 
SUEHOWIE's Avatar
 
1957 26' Overlander
Seattle (Auburn), WA , I still love my dirty water and my Red Sox-originally from Boston!
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 41
Images: 17
Send a message via AIM to SUEHOWIE Send a message via Yahoo to SUEHOWIE
Quote:
Originally Posted by cameront120 View Post
Mine too! Which is why I live here!
I have lived in Seattle for a year and a half and we have been to Vancouver three times so far to visit, and to visit a friend in Abbottsford another time as well. I love it there too.
SUEHOWIE is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2008, 06:25 AM   #26
Rivet Master
 
Ed Emerick's Avatar
 
1968 30' Sovereign
1959 18' "Footer"
1954 22' Flying Cloud
Brussels , Wisconsin
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 613
Floor Rot

I have an 88 29' as well and had the same problem (well it's still there I have 1/3 of the rear floor removed). The one leak that you have to check out is where the compartment door hinge covers the seam between the skins. Drill out the 6 or so rivets and seal that seam under the hinge, on both sides. I found that I had thought that I had all the leaks I could find fixed and then did the hose test and found the leak at the compartment door. You would think that at the factory this would have been done!????

Ed

Also drop me a line if you have questions I'm doing the same repair that you are as I type this.
Ed Emerick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2008, 06:26 AM   #27
Rivet Master
 
Ed Emerick's Avatar
 
1968 30' Sovereign
1959 18' "Footer"
1954 22' Flying Cloud
Brussels , Wisconsin
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 613
Quote:
Originally Posted by Forrest View Post
There will be an article in the next Vintage Advantage newsletter on floor replacement and you might want to read that first before hiring anyone to do the work.
ya know when the next issue will be out?
Ed Emerick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2008, 06:45 AM   #28
Rivet Master
 
Shacksman's Avatar
 
1960 28' Ambassador
Vintage Kin Owner
1998 25' Safari
Avonton , Ontario
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 1,311
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed Emerick View Post
I have an 88 29' as well and had the same problem (well it's still there I have 1/3 of the rear floor removed). The one leak that you have to check out is where the compartment door hinge covers the seam between the skins. Drill out the 6 or so rivets and seal that seam under the hinge, on both sides. I found that I had thought that I had all the leaks I could find fixed and then did the hose test and found the leak at the compartment door. You would think that at the factory this would have been done!????

Ed
Ed, this is not a new problem with the factory. I just replaced the front panel on my 60 28' and there was no sealent at the seams. The side panels did overlap about a foot but you could see where the water had been seeping in and running along toward the interior. There is lots of vulcum on the seams now.
__________________
Doug & Terry
VAC - TAC ON-1
60 Ambassador Int.
1950 Spartan
1966 Globetrotter
Shacksman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2008, 07:31 AM   #29
3 Rivet Member
 
1973 31' Excella 500
Morristown , Tennessee
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 193
Images: 9
I can appreciate the problem of bad floors. I am refurgishing my 1073 Excella and have found some bad places. The worst is in the rear right where the water pipes go through the floor. To really fix it properly, I would have to take the pipes apart then replace the floor and resweat the joints. It is located in the rear bedroom under a side table along with the fuse box. The isn't much storage there and no one will ever step there. I plan the cut out most of the bad wood, cut a template (can't use the rotted wood), and replace with new. The spot is about 1x2xft. It may not be as good as some of the perfectionists jobs I've seen here but will be close. The other spot is right next to the entry door where the weather stripping leaked. These are on both side and about 6 inches square. These are the most problematic for me. To do properly, I would have to remove a much larger area to reach ribs to attach the floor. Not a problem on the front side as I have removed the cabinets but the rear side have the univolt. I am not that interested in disconnecting the unit as I don't plan to replace it. I'm hoping I can reach a rib without too much problem.

I have repaced all of the weather stripping and am looking for more leaks. Planning to seal the roof openings before refinishing the exterior.

Good work for all - keeps a lot of guys out of trouble.
__________________
Joe DeFelice
1973 Excella 500
Alumin8 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2008, 07:57 AM   #30
Site Team
 
azflycaster's Avatar

 
2002 25' Safari
Dewey , Arizona
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 14,666
Images: 62
Blog Entries: 1
The rear floor on the 70's can be a problem. Water can come in where the rear bumper meets the skin and should be properly sealed. My 75 had a slight case of rot in the same area as you described. It was limited to the surface and the lower layers of plywood were still in good shape. I treated this area with Rot Doctor to prevent further problems and to give it back some additional strength. I also treated all the good wood in this area at the same time.

The water line on my trailer was relocated by a PO when the copper was replaced with PEX. The inlet is now on the outer skin above the floor.
__________________

Richard

Wally Byam Airstream Club 7513
azflycaster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2008, 08:03 AM   #31
Aluminut
 
Silvertwinkie's Avatar
 
2004 25' Safari
. , Illinois
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 10,476
I am not sure if you are talking about this dealer:

Parts and Service - Fogdall RV

I have seen a few jobs they did and they were really pretty darn good. Of course this was about 4-5 years ago........
__________________
Computers manufactured by companies such as IBM, Compaq and millions of others are by far the most popular with about 70 million machines in use worldwide. Macintosh fans note that cockroaches are far more numerous than humans and that numbers alone do not denote a higher life form. -NY Times 11/91
Silvertwinkie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2008, 01:20 PM   #32
2 Rivet Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 75
Thanks for all the follow-ups to my post. We have most of the bad floor out and are drying the entire area. Was really worried about the floor near toilet so had toilet pulled but floor around toilet is solid. We will not be doing much work now since it winter just arrived. We have trailer winterized and cover is on it. I COULD get in to work on it but doubt anything will be done until spring. And we are not-unfortunately-heading for Green Valley or Rockport this winter. This is No Country For Old Beat Up Men during the winter. HA!
Anniedog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2008, 08:29 PM   #33
Rivet Master
 
1973 31' Sovereign
Portland , Oregon
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 1,255
Images: 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alumin8 View Post
I can appreciate the problem of bad floors. I am refurgishing my 1073 Excella and have found some bad places. The worst is in the rear right where the water pipes go through the floor. To really fix it properly, I would have to take the pipes apart then replace the floor and resweat the joints. It is located in the rear bedroom under a side table along with the fuse box. The isn't much storage there and no one will ever step there. I plan the cut out most of the bad wood, cut a template (can't use the rotted wood), and replace with new. The spot is about 1x2xft. It may not be as good as some of the perfectionists jobs I've seen here but will be close. The other spot is right next to the entry door where the weather stripping leaked. These are on both side and about 6 inches square. These are the most problematic for me. To do properly, I would have to remove a much larger area to reach ribs to attach the floor. Not a problem on the front side as I have removed the cabinets but the rear side have the univolt. I am not that interested in disconnecting the unit as I don't plan to replace it. I'm hoping I can reach a rib without too much problem.

I have repaced all of the weather stripping and am looking for more leaks. Planning to seal the roof openings before refinishing the exterior.

Good work for all - keeps a lot of guys out of trouble.
If you use plywood ledgers around the edge of the cutout area like I detailed above you do not have to cut the hole big enough to get to frame members. Lots of us have made repairs like that and there is even a recomendation from Airstream along the same lines in my 1973 shop manual. With the legders, glue and screws the patch is plenty strong enouh without going to frame members. So you can keep the problem small and local.

Malcolm
__________________
Only he who attempts the ridiculous can achieve the impossble.
malconium is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-2008, 08:09 AM   #34
Rivet Master
 
rogerdodger's Avatar
 
1974 Argosy 28
Fresno/Clovis , California
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 701
Quote:
Originally Posted by azflycaster View Post
The rear floor on the 70's can be a problem. Water can come in where the rear bumper meets the skin and should be properly sealed. My 75 had a slight case of rot in the same area as you described. It was limited to the surface and the lower layers of plywood were still in good shape. I treated this area with Rot Doctor to prevent further problems and to give it back some additional strength. I also treated all the good wood in this area at the same time. .
I'm having a problem finding the rain seapage into my 1981 Excella II. Is this rear bumper a problem with 1981's as well??
__________________
Roger
rogerdodger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2009, 10:57 AM   #35
2 Rivet Member
 
GoMopar440's Avatar
 
1973 31' Sovereign
Aransas Pass , Texas
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anniedog View Post
And we are not-unfortunately-heading for Green Valley or Rockport this winter.
That's too bad. Rockport, TX is only about 10 minutes north from where I live. I'd be willing to try to help you out if you do happen to get down this way. I need to do some major floor repair on my '73 Sovereign and your floor problem sounds like it would be a simple fix compared to mine.
GoMopar440 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2009, 09:43 AM   #36
2 Rivet Member
 
1975 25' Tradewind
Central , California
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 74
See our post re: poor wheel well design. Might answer many questions for you...
Pepsi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2009, 04:01 PM   #37
2 Rivet Member
 
1972 Argosy 20
Tallahassee , Florida
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 27
I replaced the plywood flooring in the entire rear end on my Argosy 20. Rain water is comming in, I'm guessing from the bumper area. I am going to tackle that soon. I'm not sure how I'll repair it but I'll know more when I remove the door and whatever else I have to remove from the top of the bumper.
Bo
Bo Walker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2009, 07:02 PM   #38
2 Rivet Member
 
Currently Looking...
Spring Hill , Florida
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 31
That large headed 'thing' is no doubt a screw that held the wood to the frame. I patched some places I had in a previous trailer and had to un-screw those to place the pieces in the spots I fixed.
zekethebear is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-19-2009, 03:15 AM   #39
1 Rivet Member
 
PetesPup's Avatar
 
1989 32' Excella
Meridian , Idaho
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 18
OSB in a Trailer?

So who was the genius at AS the decided OSB in a trailer was a good Idea? I just got done ripping out the front and back of my 87 Excella. I would not wish that job on anyone. I found out when I ripped up the carpet (carpet on OSB in a trailer?) in the back bedroom to put in hardwood floors. I could put my finger through parts of it. Man was I . I hope they fired the jerk.
__________________
Bill
'87 Excella 32'
PetesPup is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-26-2009, 09:11 PM   #40
2 Rivet Member
 
1975 25' Tradewind
Central , California
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 74
Yeah, I feel your pain... See my post here titled "airstream quality control". Or just do a search re: Pepsi under the member search or post search to view it....

I found the same thing, same problem. I painstakingly removed all of the OSB from the frame and master cut the plywood to fit in and around the frame screws, which are critical to the structural integrity of the unit.

You could put your finger through the floor, I pulled out chunks and clumps by hand. Black and moldy. Our problem originated with a poor wheel well design. There is a seam between the wheel well and the frame doomed to fail. I have a fix for that too. Rivit or screw on a metal shield over the crutial part of the seam, the front and back. Then, spray on bed liner. I think we are going with Line X. You choose.

We have two Airstream trailers. one 1975 Trade Wind and one 1994 Excella. Both 25 footers. The 1975 has good solid ply wood. The 1994 has OSB. I have heard roomers that they are using partical board in the newer ones. Funny thing, the display I saw at the AS dealership in Sacramento had 3/4 in ply wood, not OSB, not partical board. Seemed like false advertising to me... Not cool.

We are at sheatlie@comcast.net if you have questions...

We had both our trailers in Yosemite for a shake down cruise after renovating each of them with new floors, servicing all components and new upholstery. They worked GREAT. Love em.

Airstream made them. I made them better. It will take them much longer to rebuild my opinion then it took me to rebuild their trailer. My standards are high and I would own no other. I just want Airstream to maintain the Quality Control, so that we, the trailer owners can maintain their reputation.

Happy travels all.
Pepsi is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Goodyear surprise 63air Tires 31 09-27-2006 09:53 PM
surprise!!! rebel beck Off Topic Forum 2 04-02-2006 10:23 AM
The Icky floor surprise eljay Repairing/Replacing Floor &/or Frame 9 11-18-2004 03:58 AM
The '57 was a surprise! Mr. Bliss Our Community 4 04-18-2003 08:32 AM
Yet Another Surprise winner General Motorhome Topics 12 07-24-2002 04:48 PM


Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Disclaimer:

This website is not affiliated with or endorsed by the Airstream, Inc. or any of its affiliates. Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:51 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.