Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 05-15-2015, 11:14 PM   #57
Rivet Master

 
2007 22' International CCD
Corona , California
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 3,322
I also must mention that the Navy does amazing firefighting training including real fires in simulated shipboard structures and teaches you to fight and win over huge oil fires with just water and appropriate techniques. None of which are applicable to putting out a fire inside a small trailer with inadequate equipment.

That said, the guys at firefighting school at Treasure Island have saved my butt multiple times in emergencies by making it possible to think clearly, plan and do firefighting without panicking first. Training like that will save you when it hits the fan...

If you don't have the training, don't get in the fight...


Sent from my pocket Internet using Airstream Forums
__________________

__________________
KE4GNK/AE
'The Silver HamShack' (2007 International 22FB CCD 75th Aniversary model)
Multiple Yaesu Ham Radios inside and many antennae sprouting from roof, ProPride hitch
2012 shortbed crewcab 4x4 Toyota Taco TV with more antennae on it
rmkrum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2015, 11:38 PM   #58
Figment of My Imagination
 
Protagonist's Avatar
 
2012 Interstate Coach
From All Over , More Than Anywhere Else
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 10,313
Here's what I said way back in post #6, this thread.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Protagonist View Post
The first step is fire prevention. Which comes down to basic housekeeping and common sense since most of the furniture is built in. The main things are to make sure you don't store burnables next to the furnace or stove, and that you keep your paths to the exits clear. And if you smoke, make your trailer a non-smoking trailer and step outside to light up. Residue from smoking accounts for a lot of fires.

The next step is fire detection. LPG detector, smoke detector, carbon monoxide detector. Have them, and make sure they all work.

The third step is fire evacuation. Know where every exit is in your Airstream, and how to get to that exit in the dark, crawling on the floor (just for fun, try crawling from your bed to the nearest exitó and opening itó with your eyes closed. It ain't always easy).

The fourth step is fire fighting. Make sure your fire extinguisher is next to an exit, because you always fight a fire from the outside in, so that the fire can't stop you from getting back out if you can't put it out. If you want to fight a fire, get out first, turn off the propane at the cylinders, and then come back in with an extinguisher. Never have a fire at your back.

Most RVs, Airstreams included, have small extinguishers that are okay for handling burning grease on a stove or other small fires, but aren't big enough to handle any major firefighting. If the fire is too big to be handled by a single extinguisher, let it burn, and evacuate toward the rear of the trailer so you're as far from the propane cylinders as possible. And if you have a chance, get training on how to use an extinguisher. Some fire departments offer such training, and even if they don't offer regular classes, stop by your local firehouse and ask if they'll train you. I doubt they'll refuse. Also, make sure your extinguisher is inspected regularly. Another good reason to stop by the firehouse.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boxite View Post
I'm sorry you do not wish to consider alternatives. But I respect your choice.

As a professional simulator instructor , Fire-escape/Evacuation is one of the subjects I recurrently train and teach.
Forget my more recent posts where the issue of "what a fire extinguisher is actually for" got flogged like a dead horse. Getting back to basics, what I said in post #6Ö Is there ANYTHING in my quoted post that you disagree with? Anything that I've got wrong? If so, then I really do want your professional opinion as to where I'm wrong.

Oh, and for clarity, when I said "evacuate toward the rear of the trailer," I mean AFTER you've gotten out by whichever unobstructed exit is closest, so that you have a whole trailer between you and the propane cylinders.
__________________

__________________
WBCCI #1105
TAC LA-4

My Google-Fu is strong today.
Protagonist is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2015, 07:15 AM   #59
Rivet Master
 
Boxite's Avatar

 
2008 22' Sport
Spicewood (W of Austin) , Texas
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 1,230
I'm only responding again because you've specifically asked if I disagree with your post #6.
Answer: No. No disagreement with #6.

It was your subsequent posts (#41, #52, #54) which prompted any comments from me at all.

Protagonist Quote: "...I'm not going to argue with you anymore. I've said all I can say to support my case, and repetition will not help..."

Protagonist Quote: "Forget my more recent posts... "

They're forgotten already.
__________________
2012 Ram 1500 Crew Cab 4.7L 4X4
Rambox
WBCCI 14676 TX ALAMO UNIT
Boxite is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2015, 08:09 AM   #60
Rivet Master
 
Currently Looking...
Nowhere , Somewhere
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 6,417
Blog Entries: 2
A little off subject. Can I mount my extinguisher horizontally as long as I take it off and shake it once in a while? Jim
__________________
avionstream is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2015, 08:13 AM   #61
Figment of My Imagination
 
Protagonist's Avatar
 
2012 Interstate Coach
From All Over , More Than Anywhere Else
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 10,313
Quote:
Originally Posted by avionstream View Post
A little off subject. Can I mount my extinguisher horizontally as long as I take it off and shake it once in a while? Jim
Upright is better, but horizontal is okay.

Caveató My Airstream Interstate came from the factory with a horizontal-mounted extinguisher. The bracket holding the extinguisher was plastic, and broke after about a year of driving on Louisiana's notoriously bad roads. I replaced the bracket with an all-metal one and haven't had a problem since.

You CAN use a plastic bracket if it's bolted to the floor, but if it's bolted to a wall or a cabinet as mine was, go with a metal bracket for horizontal mounting.
__________________
WBCCI #1105
TAC LA-4

My Google-Fu is strong today.
Protagonist is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2015, 08:50 AM   #62
Rivet Master
 
Currently Looking...
Nowhere , Somewhere
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 6,417
Blog Entries: 2
Thanks, that helps a lot. I bought a bigger than stock extinguisher and have a good place to mount it horizontally next to the door. Is shaking or turning it over periodically really necessary? Jim
__________________
avionstream is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2015, 09:07 AM   #63
cwf
Rivet Master
 
cwf's Avatar
 
1999 34' Excella
Currently Looking...
Hillsboro , Texas
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 5,934
Images: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by avionstream View Post
Thanks, that helps a lot. I bought a bigger than stock extinguisher and have a good place to mount it horizontally next to the door. Is shaking or turning it over periodically really necessary? Jim
Jim, with the modern extinguishers it is advisable to turn bottoms up occasionally. You can't invert them too often...

I do that exercise when the "seasons" change.
__________________
cwf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2015, 02:18 PM   #64
Rivet Master
 
Currently Looking...
Nowhere , Somewhere
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 6,417
Blog Entries: 2
Thanks you guys for all the advice. I managed to do a vertical mount and will rotate a few times a year. Never done that before. I learn something new every day and I'm getting to the age where I can forget it just as quickly. I can then learn it again at a later date. One of the things that makes retirement interesting. Jin
__________________
avionstream is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2015, 04:27 PM   #65
Wise Elder
 
Jammer's Avatar
 
2010 30' Classic
Vintage Kin Owner
South of the river , Minnesota
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 4,119
Some facts to consider.

The stock fire extinguisher on most Airstreams is a 2.5 pound dry chemical one. These are good to put out a cooking fire that hasn't spread, and not much more. In most cases, there is space for a 5 pound extinguisher. Amerex makes a chrome-plated one which, IMO, is a better choice for the decor than the standard red or white ones. In any color, the Amerex extinguishers are high quality and can be recharged when necessary.

If we are boondocking, we carry a 2.5 gallon pressurized water extinguisher in the back of our tow vehicle and, when setting up camp, place it in the area between the propane tanks and the trailer. Useful for dealing with a campfire that has gotten out of hand or that is no longer prudent due to sudden winds. These are loaded with just water and compressed air so you can refill them yourself if you want, which means that you can practice with them at no cost, which you should.

I've tried to find solid data on RV fires and haven't succeeded. The best data is anecdotal. I summarize my unscientific findings:

1) Most RV fires are electrical in origin. Of these, most involve the 120v system.
2) Most RV fires occur while the RV is parked and unoccupied, especially for travel trailers. (For motorhomes it isn't unusual for fires to originate with the running gear while under way)
3) RV fires that occur while the RV is occupied mirror stick-house fires in their statistical properties. That is, causes are typically: cooking fires, candles, smoking materials, and portable heaters.
4) Compared to other causes, fires resulting from leaks or malfunctions of the propane system are very rare.

My advice is:

1) Don't use a portable heater.
1a) If you use a portable heater, keep it 36" away from combustibles, especially bedding. (This is nearly impossible to do in an RV. See item 1 above.)
2) Quit smoking. Failing that, at least don't smoke cigarettes in bed while you're drunk.
3) If you use candles inside your airstream, do so only with great caution, especially if there are kids around.
4) Don't use portable camping appliances in your airstream (stoves, tent heaters, propane lights, etc.)
5) Take a class, get a demonstration, or use a fire extinguisher yourself in a nonemergency situation.
6) Replace your smoke alarm with a photoelectric one. They're less prone to false alarms from cooking, so you won't be as tempted to pull the battery out because it's beeping while you're frying bacon.
__________________
To learn to see below the surface, you must adjust your altitude
Jammer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2015, 09:36 PM   #66
Rivet Master
 
blkmagikca's Avatar

 
1987 32' Excella
Nepean , Ontario
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 1,132
Not that many people have actually seen an RV on fire, but I have. The RV was a class C motor-home built on a Toyota truck chassis (it was far from new). The lady living in it was a full-timer. This happened in Quarzsite AZ about 4 years ago. I was camped on the other side of Plomosa Road from where she was and witnessed the whole event.

The lady had gone into town earlier that day to get a propane fill. The kid doing the fill had difficulty detaching the propane hose when the fill was completed, probably because in the course of filling the MH’s tank there is a temperature drop at the nozzle causing it to contract and tighten. So the kid knocked the nozzle loose with a hammer. In so doing, he must have caused the copper propane line to either crack or loosen in the vicinity of the refrigerator. A couple of hours later the lady was sitting with friends around a campfire when someone noticed that her rig was on fire. She opened the door and was met by a wall of flame. She was able to grab her guitar case and computer, as they were near the door – everything else burned right to the ground. The intensity of the heat, fueled by the gasoline and propane was brutal. One trailer parked about 25-30 feet away from her was damaged by the heat (the aluminum exterior walls buckled).

In this case, a fire-extinguisher would have been as useful as a child’s water pistol. The lady was lucky not to have been injured, although she lost all her possessions, documents, etc.
__________________
VE3JDZ
AIR 12148
1987 Excella 32-foot
1999 Dodge Ram 2500HD Diesel
blkmagikca is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2015, 10:33 PM   #67
1 Rivet Member
 
2001 30' Classic S/O
2001 31' Land Yacht
Newport , Oregon
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 13
I spent thirty years in policing a tourist community and have been present at several RV fires: travel trailer (one Airsteam)and motorhomes. I also built Beaver motorhomes back in the 70s (class C and their original class A). Most of the fires were the result of an electric heater being tipped over or covered up. One was from a wall mount catalytic that had something hanging in front, and a couple were from stove tops. The best advice made earlier is to have working smoke detectors. At least one in the main area and one in the sleeping area. If an RV catches these things go up hot and fast. Fire in an RV spreads much more rapidly than you can imagine, so unless it is very small and localized, get the heck out in any way you can: door, escape window or bust out the closest window. Besides the quickly spreading fire, the smoke is highly toxic and will debilitate a person very quickly. Several of the deaths I have investigated were from smoke, the detectors probably disabled or not working and at night. At least one occurred because the person would not break out the window and by the time we were able to do so they succumbed to the smoke. Bottom line, get out quickly, leave everything. Even with the water a firefighter has available most RV fires are out of control immediately and firefighting is merely an effort to keep other RVs from catching. Please don't get me wrong, I am not trying to be an alarmist and the ratio of fires to RV's on the road or being lived in is pretty small. But if one starts do not take a chance on getting hurt.
__________________
dateem is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2015, 10:59 PM   #68
3 Rivet Member
 
timhortons's Avatar
 
2015 16' Sport
Oakville , Ontario
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 234
Images: 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by dateem View Post
I spent thirty years in policing a tourist community and have been present at several RV fires: travel trailer (one Airsteam)and motorhomes. I also built Beaver motorhomes back in the 70s (class C and their original class A). Most of the fires were the result of an electric heater being tipped over or covered up. One was from a wall mount catalytic that had something hanging in front, and a couple were from stove tops. The best advice made earlier is to have working smoke detectors. At least one in the main area and one in the sleeping area. If an RV catches these things go up hot and fast. Fire in an RV spreads much more rapidly than you can imagine, so unless it is very small and localized, get the heck out in any way you can: door, escape window or bust out the closest window. Besides the quickly spreading fire, the smoke is highly toxic and will debilitate a person very quickly. Several of the deaths I have investigated were from smoke, the detectors probably disabled or not working and at night. At least one occurred because the person would not break out the window and by the time we were able to do so they succumbed to the smoke. Bottom line, get out quickly, leave everything. Even with the water a firefighter has available most RV fires are out of control immediately and firefighting is merely an effort to keep other RVs from catching. Please don't get me wrong, I am not trying to be an alarmist and the ratio of fires to RV's on the road or being lived in is pretty small. But if one starts do not take a chance on getting hurt.
This makes sense to me. You're about a zillion times more likely to be overcome by smoke(CO2), and gas yourself than burn to death,. The extinguisher is for small cooktop fires, or maybe a candle that catches a drape if you are lucky and looking at it when it happens. If you can't contain the fire you need to be out the nearest exit now. The toy extinguisher isn't going to do jack squat or clear some sort of "path". All the wood and laminate will burn with formaldehyde impregnated glue accelerating it and the foam in your seat cushions and cover, will burn like plasticy napalm once it starts with drops of acrid chlorine gas acid. Once the thing heats up the Au will warp/expand around the window and your exits won't work anyways. A wet towel if you had to jump through a flaming hot area, but faster to just get out in this small space. Don't be a hero, don't go back to save the cat/hamster/budgie etc.
__________________
timhortons is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-19-2015, 10:25 AM   #69
Wise Elder
 
Jammer's Avatar
 
2010 30' Classic
Vintage Kin Owner
South of the river , Minnesota
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 4,119
Quote:
Originally Posted by dateem View Post
Most of the fires were the result of an electric heater being tipped over or covered up.
Quote:
One was from a wall mount catalytic that had something hanging in front
Why people continue to ignore the substantial risk to life and property that these things pose is beyond me.
__________________
To learn to see below the surface, you must adjust your altitude
Jammer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-19-2015, 10:32 AM   #70
Wise Elder
 
Jammer's Avatar
 
2010 30' Classic
Vintage Kin Owner
South of the river , Minnesota
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 4,119
Quote:
Originally Posted by timhortons View Post
The extinguisher is for small cooktop fires, or maybe a candle that catches a drape if you are lucky and looking at it when it happens. If you can't contain the fire you need to be out the nearest exit now. The toy extinguisher isn't going to do jack squat or clear some sort of "path".
A fire extinguisher is not an answer for everything.

On the other hand, they are of great value for the many fires that start small and do not pose an immediate risk of bodily harm. Cooking fires, tire fires, grass that has ignited from a campfire, cigarette butt, or exhaust system, malfunctioning generator or grill.
__________________

__________________
To learn to see below the surface, you must adjust your altitude
Jammer is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
New NT-30SP fires 10 sec. then goes out, fan on fotochop Furnaces, Heaters, Fireplaces & Air Conditioning 3 01-06-2009 08:04 PM
Dometic Refrigerator Fires? Cracker Refrigerators 89 07-27-2008 05:59 PM
Florida Fires Devoman Off Topic Forum 8 05-16-2007 07:16 AM
RVers at Western Wild Fires - California Streamer1 On The Road... 2 10-27-2006 11:07 AM
Temecula (Corona) California Fires Cat Off Topic Forum 3 05-08-2004 11:56 AM


Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:43 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.