Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 07-01-2015, 12:54 PM   #29
Rivet Master
 
Hittenstiehl's Avatar

 
1965 24' Tradewind
1962 28' Ambassador
1961 19' Globetrotter
Mesa , Arizona
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 3,044
Images: 9
Our experience is similar. In younger years while hiking Mt Whitney about half our group was overcome with Altitude Sickness. There didn't seem to be any rhyme or reason to whom was affected. Mostly young, quite fit and no breathing issues. We did the 2 day climb from east side and backtracked slightly to our overnight camping spot at a lower elevation near a beautiful flowing waterfall. It was a very rough night for many. Severe headaches, cramping and intestinal problems. It was also rather cold and the wind howled across like a train and would flatten our tents on top of us. Luckily there were a nice set of brand new solar toilets that provided shelter and warmth for many that felt ill. Rather than trek back and forth thru camp several just left on their boots and coats and took their sleeping bags and hung out in the fancy porta johns. In the morning the waterfall hung frozen in mid fall.
__________________

__________________

Hittenstiehl
Hittenstiehl is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-01-2015, 12:55 PM   #30
Rivet Master
 
Lily&Me's Avatar

 
2006 22' Interstate
Normal , Illinois
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 13,569
Another thing I found out about altitude, meals eaten between altitude changes (say 6000') would tend to digest differently, and cause a more urgent purge outside my "normal" time frame.

Well, that sounds delightful.


Maggie
__________________

__________________
🏡 🚐 Cherish and appreciate those you love. This moment could be your last.🌹🐚❤️
Lily&Me is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-01-2015, 01:11 PM   #31
1 Rivet Member
 
2013 25' Flying Cloud
Vian , Oklahoma
Join Date: Apr 2015
Posts: 17
I told my Oklahoma physician that I had experienced altitude problems in Leadville, CO for the first time in 30 years. She told me she would write me a Rx so it wouldn't happen next time. When I looked at the paper, it said, "Spend the night in Santa Fe."
__________________
Okie 1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-01-2015, 01:42 PM   #32
3 Rivet Member
 
2004 28' Classic
austin , Texas
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 221
Smart doc! We know that the two days driving from Texas to Colorado allows us to slowly acclimatize. When we fly, we are particularly vigilant about hydrating before, during and after the flight, and often spend the first night in Denver. It is only half as high as our cabin, and gives our bodies time to adjust.


Sent from my iPad using Airstream Forums
__________________
Ntex is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-01-2015, 01:48 PM   #33
Rivet Master
 
Ray Eklund's Avatar

 
2014 25' International
2006 23' Safari SE
Currently Looking...
Boulder City , Nevada
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 2,369
FIVE CENTS to keep Hydrated at Altitude

Quote:
Originally Posted by Okie 1 View Post
I told my Oklahoma physician that I had experienced altitude problems in Leadville, CO for the first time in 30 years. She told me she would write me a Rx so it wouldn't happen next time. When I looked at the paper, it said, "Spend the night in Santa Fe."
*****

I laughed so hard, it gave me a headache....

I use the Penny System for hydration. At home and on the road. It is the 5 cent routine.

I have seven single cents on the window sill at home and a 14 ounce cup. Each time I drink a cup of water, I slide a cent over. Each day I try to have at the minimum, FIVE CENTS worth. The sixth cent is a bonus. Seven... it must have been a busy working outside day. Anything other than water does not count towards your five cents worth. OK. Coffee, caffeinated sodas, beer, wine... although pop cycles are worth a little bit.

When working hard digging into a shale deposit for trilobites in Nevada or Utah you can go through a DIME's worth of water and maybe have to relieve yourself once, maybe twice. It can be so dry you do not perspire as it evaporates so fast off your skin. Your skin will be shiny and salty, but not wet unless you are wearing a cap to water your hair follicles.

I always have a large Costco can of Peanuts (slight allergy to them, but I know when to stop eating them) along on trips, mixed nuts and either corn chips or potato chips for the salt and something to burn for energy. Energy bars are OK, but maybe too healthy for me.

When you are licking your lips and they are... salty. Too little water intake. If your dog(s) are licking you and keep following you closely... too little water intake.

When your have burned up your breakfast and working hard at elevation, there comes a point where you swear someone "pulled the plug" and you just want to sit down and doze off to sleep. Too little water AND no food consumed. Eat like a bird foraging when hiking around. Although, if you weigh yourself the next morning, you might lose 2 to 5 pounds... mostly water but maybe some of that stored fat gets used up as well. Not my department.

I normally weigh in the 178 to 181 pound range for 6 feet tall. I can be down to 172 if the digging or the walking for miles looking for unusual rocks consume my attention. My wife says if I get below 170, she is hauling me off to the doctor. Since, as a male, I do not enjoy a visit to the doctor, I carry plenty of water and snacks when away from camp. Remember the "Smart Porters" carrying food and water. Their loads get lighter over time, while the other porters are carrying the same load coming and going... just a thought.

If you want to lose weight, having a mountain climbing or rock hunting/hiking hobby might be the secret. Of course, if you look at those that already are doing these active interests, they are all bone and muscle. Fat is a luxury, if the winter was sedentary and holiday left overs in excess...

If you become drowsy hiking in the west, DRINK WATER. If you are not drowsy and your energy level is like a dead battery... EAT A CHEESEBURGER AND FRIES and Drink Water. It does not have to be out of a plastic store bought water bottle. Some of the water you drink in the Rockies from small towns might be the best Spring Water available for free. Our well water comes out of the well at close to 58F and almost, I said almost, as good as Micro Brewery Beer.

This is a very diverse community from the responses! The USA Olympic Committee have an arena in Colorado Springs at 6,000 feet plus. Maybe take it to Leadville, CO at 10,000 feet... Oh well. Just a thought.
__________________
Human Bean
Ray Eklund is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-01-2015, 03:17 PM   #34
Rivet Master
 
ColoradoLady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 1,040
This is, indeed, an important thread...valuable for those coming to high mountain regions, from sea level. Also, a good reminder for those of us living in lower Colorado! Case in point...Denver at 5280. In my younger years...late 50's...I eagerly skiied black diamond runs of Winter park, Breckinridge, Purgatory MTN, Vail, etc...hiked the highest mountain trails, backpack camping...all activities with no high altitude effects.
Now, in mid 70's...a different story! 2013, towing a T@B trailer...camped just north of Durango 3 days, then on to Silverton, where I experienced a serious case of altitude sickness. After trying to ignore symptoms...(DUMB)!...finally admitted that what I was feeling, was indeed, serious, I grabbed a tank of 02, bottled water, and asked for help breaking camp, left 3 days early, drove as carefully as possible till I reached lower altitude...from Silverton to Ouray...a gut wrenching drive, at the best of times...then onward till lower altitudes calmed the worst of it. Once at home,...and a trip to my MD, was safe, after a week, getting back to normal for me.

So, this year, I decide to be careful, and only went to Durango for a week. While I did not experience altitude sickness, I was quite lethargic and unable to do more than just sit around camp. Short strolls were physically stressing. 02 use helped, but, not enough for me to do what I wanted to do on my trip.

This, of course, makes me sad, as my preferred regions to camp in my AS, are mountainous! I will continue, but, with caution.

My point being...living in Denver area at 5280, does no longer provide me with immunity to effects of altitude. Aging, and some illnesses that may come along...all take toll on our abilities to deal with altitude. While sea level dwellers plan to visit these beautiful mountains of ours...for your own health and safety, please take the time to acclimate to higher elevations, consider your own health status, and take necessary precautions accordingly. If your health issues will be helped, ask your MD TO PRESCRIBE 02, for your use if needed. Best to be prepared if you do need it. Do consider your own health needs. Be aware of the possible symptoms of progressive altitude sickness, and react accordingly, early on.

Enjoy your vacation trips and return home with good health and plenty of photos and great memories! HAPPY TRAILS, YA'LL!
__________________
ColoradoLady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-01-2015, 03:34 PM   #35
Rivet Master
 
ColoradoLady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 1,040
Ray, I want to thank you for your many postings. I've found several, and find them to be insightful, interesting, humorous, (at times), and mostly, quite valuable. I look forward to your and Maggie's renditions of the current trip. Envious, wish I could join in, and will enjoy via your writings. Safe journey!
__________________
ColoradoLady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-01-2015, 04:15 PM   #36
Rivet Master
 
Ray Eklund's Avatar

 
2014 25' International
2006 23' Safari SE
Currently Looking...
Boulder City , Nevada
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 2,369
Attitude Sickness has NO CURE...

Quote:
Originally Posted by ColoradoLady View Post
Ray, I want to thank you for your many postings. I've found several, and find them to be insightful, interesting, humorous, (at times), and mostly, quite valuable. I look forward to your and Maggie's renditions of the current trip. Envious, wish I could join in, and will enjoy via your writings. Safe journey!
******

Next time, I am sure you will be up to an adventure not of your making.

I will let Maggie and the others do renditions. I would find myself being too pompous and biased finding the biggest and best New Mexico Rosettes among the group, which is my current prediction. Even if it has to be found in my pocket, before the trip.

It appears we will also have an expert Indian Artifact individual on this trip. I am looking forward to that and get some time around the Community Fire Pit, talking Archaeology and the American Indian of the past.

I suffer from chronic "Attitude Sickness". If I am not exploring to bring things home. I am exploring home to toss things out.
__________________
Human Bean
Ray Eklund is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-01-2015, 04:22 PM   #37
Rivet Master
 
Lily&Me's Avatar

 
2006 22' Interstate
Normal , Illinois
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 13,569
You guys are too funny.

Ray....there is some excitement coming thru with you. You are looking forward to Peter Pan-ing us out into the Wilderness.

You know, neither Doug nor I ever had any difficulty with altitude. Not flying, nor in the Tetons, Glacier, Pikes Peak, Colorado Rockies....nothing, ever.

I was on blood thinners before we bought our first RV...the 77 Barth...in 2002, and Doug took an aspirin every day for his own reasons.

It really makes me wonder if thinner blood is the ticket to not getting altitude sickness.


Maggie
__________________
🏡 🚐 Cherish and appreciate those you love. This moment could be your last.🌹🐚❤️
Lily&Me is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-01-2015, 06:38 PM   #38
Rivet Master
 
ColoradoLady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 1,040
Maggie, while I wish thinner blood is the panacea, I regret to say...not for all. After 4 episodes of DVTs, pulmonary embolism over 5 years, blood studies reveal that I have 4 of the 5 factors that predispose me to blood clot formation. For past several years, I've been on daily Coumadin and daily aspirin therapy. As previously posted...that does not prevent altitude sickness for me. Of couse, in my case, there is a genetic factor involved...sad for me.

I am glad for you that you are not as susceptible. Enjoy the mountains and your solo trips. Doug will watch over you! God bless you.
__________________
ColoradoLady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-01-2015, 07:06 PM   #39
Rivet Master
 
Lily&Me's Avatar

 
2006 22' Interstate
Normal , Illinois
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 13,569
I have a genetic factor, too.

Well, for whatever reason....I am not anticipating problems with the altitude, and hope that is the case.


Maggie
__________________
🏡 🚐 Cherish and appreciate those you love. This moment could be your last.🌹🐚❤️
Lily&Me is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-01-2015, 07:47 PM   #40
Rivet Master
 
ColoradoLady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 1,040
If you've not had problems up to now, you probably won't! Have a terrific trip!
__________________
ColoradoLady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2015, 10:36 AM   #41
Rivet Master
 
Gearheart's Avatar

 
1973 Argosy 24
Kitchener , Ontario
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 853
Images: 1
I once started a snowball fight in late July on Independence pass at 12000 feet. It lasted less than a minute and the recovery period was 3 hours and getting back down the hill to Glenwood Springs. Taking it easy at higher altitude is very good practice.
__________________
Gearheart is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2015, 08:48 AM   #42
Rivet Master
 
Denis4x4's Avatar
 
2006 25' Safari FB SE
Currently Looking...
Durango , Colorado
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 1,111
When we lived in Telluride, our house was at 10,000' and the guest house had an easy to use 02 bottle/mask. More than a few guests took advantage of the 02. There is no reason not to have an emergency 02 setup in your RV if you anticipate visiting high altitude locations and are concerned about your ability to cope.
__________________

__________________
If you don't go first class, your heirs will!
Denis4x4 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Norcold fridge and high altitude performance star kitty Refrigerators 4 10-24-2014 09:51 PM
Onan carbureters with altitude adj. about year 2000 DaveFL Mechanics Corner - Engines, Transmission & More... 0 09-19-2011 02:11 PM
Altitude generator adjustment ESCAPE POD Generators & Solar Power 12 10-20-2009 10:52 AM
Water heater wont stay lit at high altitude Airstream25 Water Heaters, Filters & Pumps 2 01-26-2008 07:43 PM
AIR is back from unexpected holiday break! Janet H Forum Admin, News and Member Account Info 11 12-26-2007 09:18 PM


Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:45 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.