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Old 02-22-2021, 01:59 PM   #1
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1977 31' Sovereign
Rochester , WASHINGTON
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A year round survival type Airstream- How to??

Given the recent Texas winter storm, this is for new to Airstream+ adverse camping conditions, trailer owners.
Very cold and hot weather ( like hurricanes) conditions call for a long learning curve to function with probable failed power grid conditions, or hitting the road to escape those conditions.
Being pre equipped + well stocked before unusual demand is key.
For example, generators.
What are some tips from experienced road warrior / survival knowledgeable owners?
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Old 02-22-2021, 03:39 PM   #2
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Some possible categories-
Water purification of ground water sources ( Berkey type systems), + stored food possibilities.
Safe fuel storage + usage
Portable appliances- Heaters( electric+ propane) safe usage and approx. run times of 1# propane bottle fueled small grills / camp stoves/lanterns /Buddy series heaters/etc
Tire changing equipment.Bottle jacks/ jack stands/ tire chocks/ 12 Volt cigarette lighter plug in air compressors/etc
Basic tool kits.
First aid kits
Cold weather clothing/Sub zero sleeping bags/ etc
Hurricane / fire season will soon be here.Millions displaced or challenged every year.
Tips on leaving early, towing at night when most wont, to be able to get out without being caught in massive traffic jams.
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Old 02-22-2021, 04:14 PM   #3
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For power I would have at least 2 Honda Eu2200i gasoline generators running in tandem or the 4400W equivalent from another generator brand. Then I would want at least 42 gallons of gasoline in the truck bed so I could run the generators at full capacity for 1 week. This should cover you in the heat or cold. Not sure yet which electric heaters I would choose but here's the fuel tank I would use:

https://www.amazon.com/RDS-71789-Rec...4035073&sr=8-5
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Old 02-22-2021, 05:47 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by mikextr View Post
For power I would have at least 2 Honda Eu2200i gasoline generators running in tandem or the 4400W equivalent from another generator brand. Then I would want at least 42 gallons of gasoline in the truck bed so I could run the generators at full capacity for 1 week. This should cover you in the heat or cold. Not sure yet which electric heaters I would choose but here's the fuel tank I would use:

https://www.amazon.com/RDS-71789-Rec...4035073&sr=8-5
Good advice!And running generators just as needed, really extends stored fuel life.
I.like Holmes 1,500 Watt portable heaters, but most brands are 750 Watts on low, 1,500 on high.Most electric heaters, like microwaves, are considered high draw home appliances, in 10 Amp range.
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Old 02-23-2021, 09:08 AM   #5
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These are not 4 season trailers, and the best advice would be watch the weather reports and "get out of dodge" to a better location ahead of the disaster.
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Old 02-23-2021, 09:44 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by Toasterlife View Post
These are not 4 season trailers, and the best advice would be watch the weather reports and "get out of dodge" to a better location ahead of the disaster.
Very true. For a large % of Airstream owners, these are not 4 season trailers.
But these trailers are capable of withstanding extreme cold conditions,some owners do stay year round in them, in places like Montana/ Wyoming/ etc where temps hit -30 to -40+ below zero, actual temps, not wind chill.
For millions of people, like recently in Texas, those temps are mind boggling, compared to what was described in threads about this polar vortex.
Being prepared for the Texas temps they just saw, is simply standard winter preps in a lot of the northern tier of United States.
That's what this thread is for.Sure, those preps might not be needed, but it's better to have them pre positioned, than not.Its cheap insurance.
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Old 02-23-2021, 04:22 PM   #7
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Airstreams are no different than any other 2" wall RV with insolation. You can camp year round if you are prepared for it, that include polar vortices. Some good ideas already mentioned, plenty of emergency power and fuel to run it. A new game changer is "Airskirts" at "airskirts.com." With little effort, you can skirt the entire perimeter of your belly pan. Add a little auxiliary heat and the whole bottom would be protected. I stayed a winter in Omaha with really cold lows. At the time, all I had was heat from two 100# bottles and regular delivery. I banked the perimeter with snow and repaired it with snow from each storm.
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Old 02-23-2021, 06:21 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by guskmg View Post
Airstreams are no different than any other 2" wall RV with insolation. You can camp year round if you are prepared for it, that include polar vortices. Some good ideas already mentioned, plenty of emergency power and fuel to run it. A new game changer is "Airskirts" at "airskirts.com." With little effort, you can skirt the entire perimeter of your belly pan. Add a little auxiliary heat and the whole bottom would be protected. I stayed a winter in Omaha with really cold lows. At the time, all I had was heat from two 100# bottles and regular delivery. I banked the perimeter with snow and repaired it with snow from each storm.
guskmg
Thanks, that's a great cold weather tip.Skirting a Airstream,especially, creates insulating dead air space.
It stops the carburetor effect, which air flowing underneath, pulls heat away like a magnet.
Home Depot has 4◊ 8 foam boards, with a foil type front.I think they were like $11 two yrs ago, when I bought some for different use.
f you cut those in half length wise. the 2 foot high parts reach from ground to bottom of Airstream.The foil matches the Airstream
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Old 02-23-2021, 08:46 PM   #9
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With an inexpensive siphon hose you can take fuel from your vehicle's gas tank for use in your generator if necessary.
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Old 02-23-2021, 08:53 PM   #10
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With a long-ago background in aviation, I wonder about folks in storms... does anyone resort to tie-downs to keep trailers from blowing away like aircraft on the ramp at an airport? I can't imagine that an AS takes 75-120 mph cross-winds elegantly. What do people do in really high winds?

Just curious.

Thanks,
Scott
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Old 02-23-2021, 09:01 PM   #11
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1988 29' Excella
Lorena , Texas
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From recent experience...
Near Waco Texas. 48 hours without power. Temps in low single digits. About 110 hours below freezing.

In Central Texas there are no snowplows, most homes are electric heat, pipes are routinely placed in poorly insulated outside walls or even attics. Fireplaces are ornamental rather than functional. Our normal preparation for cold weather is a bundle of firewood. If it’s going to be really cold we let the faucets drip. We see snow in the air most years. We see it on the ground about every 3 to 5 years. Cold usually lasts a day or two and then we’re back into the 70s.

What I learned:
24” Reflectix is a great skirting material in a pinch. That plus a 200 watt light under the low point drain took care of the underside.

I used a 3500 watt construction generator. Less than 1000 watts we’re going to the Airstream. (750 watt heater, 200 watts underside plus enough to keep batteries topped off) The rest was going to the main house and the guest house. I ended up using just over 60 gallons of propane, mostly in the furnace. I went into the storm with about 100 gallons.

I’d winterized the water lines but had to fire them up when the main house lost heat and water. Started with 50 gallons of water and used half of it.

The generator consumption was about 4 hours per gallon. I did have to go out in the 4 wheeler to pick up gas. Was fortunate to catch a local station during a 3 hour window they had power. I stood in a long line to buy gas. I was actually the first to buy gas. Everyone else was buying lottery tickets. For the duration of the storm I used about 20 gallons.

The big lesson - I need to winterize the house just like the Airstream. The Airstream did just fine. In the main house I had one pipe break above the kitchen between the first and second floors. I also had one break in an outside wall of the guest house. Our farmhouse did not do so well. They lost all heat and had faucets dripping before the water quit running. In the end water left in the kitchen froze on the cabinet. I had 5 busted pipes there. 7 breaks in all. None in the airstream.
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Old 02-23-2021, 10:06 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skucera View Post
With a long-ago background in aviation, I wonder about folks in storms... does anyone resort to tie-downs to keep trailers from blowing away like aircraft on the ramp at an airport? I can't imagine that an AS takes 75-120 mph cross-winds elegantly. What do people do in really high winds?

Just curious.

Thanks,
Scott
Most mobile homes/ trailers in trailer parks are required to be tied/ strapped down.
As for travel trailers, they should be hooked up to a tow vehicle in storms.
Even a lightly loaded semi trailer can be blown over with tractor on a interstate in bad cross winds, but it's fairly rare.
The planes in a airport, would be a different situation, with the winds providing a lifting surface, and would have to be secured in high wind prone airports.
As for a Airstream, if a storm is approaching, best thing would be point the tow vehicle into the prevailing winds, not giving a broadside target, and hope for the best.
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Old 02-23-2021, 10:18 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by lemley View Post
From recent experience...
Near Waco Texas. 48 hours without power. Temps in low single digits. About 110 hours below freezing.

In Central Texas there are no snowplows, most homes are electric heat, pipes are routinely placed in poorly insulated outside walls or even attics. Fireplaces are ornamental rather than functional. Our normal preparation for cold weather is a bundle of firewood. If it’s going to be really cold we let the faucets drip. We see snow in the air most years. We see it on the ground about every 3 to 5 years. Cold usually lasts a day or two and then we’re back into the 70s.

What I learned:
24” Reflectix is a great skirting material in a pinch. That plus a 200 watt light under the low point drain took care of the underside.

I used a 3500 watt construction generator. Less than 1000 watts we’re going to the Airstream. (750 watt heater, 200 watts underside plus enough to keep batteries topped off) The rest was going to the main house and the guest house. I ended up using just over 60 gallons of propane, mostly in the furnace. I went into the storm with about 100 gallons.

I’d winterized the water lines but had to fire them up when the main house lost heat and water. Started with 50 gallons of water and used half of it.

The generator consumption was about 4 hours per gallon. I did have to go out in the 4 wheeler to pick up gas. Was fortunate to catch a local station during a 3 hour window they had power. I stood in a long line to buy gas. I was actually the first to buy gas. Everyone else was buying lottery tickets. For the duration of the storm I used about 20 gallons.

The big lesson - I need to winterize the house just like the Airstream. The Airstream did just fine. In the main house I had one pipe break above the kitchen between the first and second floors. I also had one break in an outside wall of the guest house. Our farmhouse did not do so well. They lost all heat and had faucets dripping before the water quit running. In the end water left in the kitchen froze on the cabinet. I had 5 busted pipes there. 7 breaks in all. None in the airstream.
Sounds like you were prepared.Your Airstream did well, with you being prepared with generator+ skirting and heat to drain line area.
The generator looms large in winter , providing power ( heat) or summer ( AC / freezers) during sustained outages.
I was amazed at the failure of maintenance guys in large apartment buildings in Texas, to fail to turn off water at the mains, when it was obvious the buildings were going to freeze up.
It's a tough thing to do in homes, but when worse comes to worse, the flooding from mains left on, should have been anticipated.
It's pretty amazing that most of the people in your line at gas station, bought lottery tickets instead of gas.
It is what it is....
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Old 02-28-2021, 01:46 AM   #14
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Lightbulb Airstream Ultimate Off Grid

Quote:
Originally Posted by B. Cole View Post
Given the recent Texas winter storm, this is for new to Airstream+ adverse camping conditions, trailer owners.
Very cold and hot weather ( like hurricanes) conditions call for a long learning curve to function with probable failed power grid conditions, or hitting the road to escape those conditions.
Being pre equipped + well stocked before unusual demand is key.
For example, generators.
What are some tips from experienced road warrior / survival knowledgeable owners?
I have experience in survival, mountaineering, camping off grid type situations as part of my normal life. I am also a prepper as well as having put thousands of hours of research into this topic and things related. I recently purchased a 78' Sovereign and have been fixing it up and making some renovations that I am in process of while living full time out of it with my wife. My intentions are an ultimate off grid survival machine... while also being quite cozy and comfy under normal conditions. I also am an experienced electrician and experience with construction in general. I love this topic so I will go through all my plans of things I have done and am doing to my trailer for how to make it ready to survive anything.

The Airstream- First and foremost you need a good trailer. I have spent a lot of time already fixing the frame and subfloor and some ribs and all kind of topics that this forum covers extensively. You need good bones and foundation of anything built for survival. The main thing I cover on this thread about the construction of the trailer is probably insulation. I am using a mix of spray foam and rockwool as well as radiant barriers. I personally think an XPS board type insulation is difficult in an airstream because of the curves. I do not have the patience to cut the boards like others to shape how it needs to and believe foam and wool will be better and easier at filling every tiny void. I will use layers of XPS in the floor where my tanks are, however. The trailer is your shelter in a survival situation so make sure it is going to keep the weather out and serve its purpose. I also think upgrading the suspension is very useful for off grid. Lift it 2in and put bigger wheels with off road capable tires on it. Not much you can do to the axles and shocks besides make sure they are working well.

Fuel- I have upgraded my 30lb LP tanks to 40lb giving me 80 total. Also, will have an extra 20lb tank in the truck as backup. In my truck I plan to upgrade the fuel cell to around 60gal as well as hold additional fuel on the truck. Haven't completely thought through how I will hold spare fuel. Tank in the bed, around the wheel well, underneath on the frame. I hope to have 80+ gal of fuel storing ability. If I am stationary for a long period of time, I will investigate local LP tank and delivery options for my camp site. In a survival mode I understand getting fuel will be near impossible. With an 80 or more gallons of fuel available I have 800-1000 mile range. I will wait and see how 100lb of propane storage does. Of course, all the fuel storing ability doesnít matter if you donít have the tanks filled up. As a rule of thumb I donít let my fuel level get below a third tank so if I need to get anywhere and canít get fuel, like say an evacuation, I will be ok until I can find fuel and have something in reserve for an unforeseen emergency. I have 80lb of attached propane and 60gal of attached gas tanks. The extra 20lb propane and 20gal gas tanks are the backups not to be used for normal daily use.

Heat A/C- My primary source of heat will be a small wood stove in the trailer. It is a more readily available and dryer form of heat that I can also cook on. In a survival situation propane eventually runs out and in a natural disaster propane will be difficult or next to impossible to get. Wood always works. Have the tools you need to collect more wood locally. I will still have my furnace and electric heaters to supplement heat or be backups if I am unable to get wood fuel. However, I will not rely on them as my only ways to have heat. If the wood stove isnít enough or I ran out of wood I can use my sleeping bags which will be more than enough even in subzero. I will be getting a skirt to go around the trailer as well to use in addition to the tank heaters to ensure protection and thermal insulation for the under side which helps a ton. I also will still use my roof top A/C with heat strip. Also have 12v roof vent fans as well for hot temperatures. In a severe heat survival situation opening windows and using fans will help but that's also where the good insulation really makes it bearable. Make sure to have good bug screens on everything that opens to the outside. In severe heat make sure to find a source of water and conserve body energy like only working during early morning and late night. In severe cold also conserve energy and do not overwork yourself into a sweat. I hate the heat so I avoid that when I can haha.

Cooking/Food- Propane is still my primary source of cooking on the range and I planned my system around conserving propane to be available for cooking because propane heat uses so much. I still use propane for the water heater as well. As a backup I can cook on a wood stove as well as open fire outdoors. Have the gear and skill to cook over an open fire. Propane will eventually run out. Another backup are my backpacking stoves that run on those little propane/butane tanks that I have a ton of. As far as food storage goes thatís my weakest point. I am a full time trailer dweller so I just donít have as much room. I have places in the trailer and my truck I store food, but I donít have some year or more stockpile filling up a bunker. Once the stored food rations run out, I have what I need to hunt, trap and fish. If I am going to be camped in the same place for a while in survival mode I would also grow food and I will have some basic planting and harvesting supplies and seed plus propagating is actually really useful.

Water- I upgraded my water tanks to 90 gal fresh and 46 gal grey that will be heated. No black because I will be using a compost toilet. My internal water filtration is a 3 stage and UV. In addition I use Big Berkey for naturally sourced water. I think a gravity fed water filter is a must. In survival mode with no propane and power and the tanks have frozen or ran out you need to source water and make it potable. For collecting rain runoff, ponds, natural spring water using a gravity filter requires no power. Gravity always works. I do not recommend river or lake water without a 3 stage and UV unless you are going to die because that water might kill you anyways haha. As another backup I have my backpacking water filters like mini pumping filter and tablets that would take much longer to use but will make it drinkable.

Power- I will have 1,100 watts of solar and 600ah of lithium batteries with a 3000w inverter that I hope to keep me powered up for my needs. I would still use hookups when I have that but I plan to camp off grid a lot. As a backup for power I have 2 Champion 2500w dual fuel generators that can be tied together like the Honda. I wanted duel fuel so I can use the 80gal of fuel or 100lb of propane I have depending on whatís more available. If I needed to conserve power because of limited sun light or whatever I can only use solar to power 12v basics like the water pump, lights, blower. I would want to keep the fridge going as long as I can on battery and propane but I can go without if I need to as I planned my food storage not needing it. As another backup to power I can just not have power. Wood still works, gravity still works and gathering food still works. It certainly is a primitive way of living, but, if youíre in survival mode and the propane is out, solar doesnít work, grid is down, water is empty you gotta do what you gotta do. With my background with electrical work I also think I could make a redneck hydroelectric generator if I could find the parts for a turbine haha.


Survival Gear- I carry all my backpacking gear with me which might seem counter intuitive. I got this trailer so I donít have to camp but I use the trailer as a base camp for backpacking too. Having all that gear is also a must for survival as well. As I mentioned having my sleeping bags and stoves and water filters are part of my backup plans. I carry compasses and maps in my pack that would be useful if I needed to go on foot to source water or food. First aid is also part of what I pack. I have a pretty beefy kit that has enough supplies to keep you alive from just about anything besides severely fatal wounds and I keep it in the trailer. I also have smaller 2 person 7 day kits I have in my packs and truck. You can only have so much first aid before you need specialized supplies and training. First and foremost, stay safe. Fatal wounds will be impossible to treat without a real ER and doctors. In a survival situation you will not be able to get to a hospital. Youíre on your own. Even if you paid 800 bucks and a monthly subscription for a fancy GPS with an SOS feature you canít rely on that when SHTF. So take precautions when doing something dangerous and if you are going to do something that risks your life and you donít have the skills to be safe do not do it. Another important thing is flashlights! I have a flashlight in every pack. Have at least 2 flashlights and 2 headlamps plus all the spare batteries. I do not like the type that as a built in rechargeable. I want to be able to remove and replace the battery if I need to. In a survival mode and I have no power I donít want to have just 5 hours of lights before the entire flashlight is totally useless. I have rechargeable CR123 and AAA I use on a normal basis but also tons of regular alkaline for backups for things. I also have a small backpacking solar panel to recharge small flashlight batteries. I few other very useful things I have in my pack to use in survival situations are emergency blankets, bivyís, fire starters, sun and bug sprays, poncho, water bottles and ropes. Carry any additional geo specific gear you might need for your area like ice climbing gear or a raft. I absolutely love having an inflatable raft in my pack and even if you think you would never go hiking in the snow, if you are forced to you will really wish you had snowshoes.
Clothing- I think this is a more obvious one. Have the clothes you need and thatís all you need. I believe in buying quality and not crappy stuff and to fix that you have not buy more. I am sort of brand loyal to Carhartt, 5.11 and North Face but thatís just me. Get a decent brand. Have the proper clothing for all 4 seasons. Have things for heavy rain/snow and extreme cold even if you live in central Texas haha. You need at least one really solid pair of boots and some high top water boots. Pro tip: have a good pair of gaiters those things are life savers. Storage is already limited in a trailer so itís much easier to only have what I need because thatís what I have room for. Iíd rather have storage for another weeksí worth of food than additional shirts and pants. No room for fashion here haha. Have a sewing kit to fix things and biodegradable soap for washing clothes in a river.
Tools- I am lucky to come from an electrical trade and have a lot of tools already. I have a hard time with this one because I just want to carry every tool I own. I would bring a table saw if I had room for it haha. Some believe in the method of being ultra light with gear and tools, but I am not among that belief. I carry a full socket and wrench set, screwdriver set, all sorts of pliers, power tool set, basic electrical kit, basic plumbing kit, saws and hammers, some other random stuff. About 3 toolboxes worth. This means I do not use 75% of my tools on a regular basis but I will be so glad I have it when I need it. I also carry all sorts of spare parts for electrical and plumbing things. In a survival situation if a pipe burst, furnace breaks, broken LP line you canít just bring it to the closest mothership for repairs. You canít rely on a dealer to fix your truck. In a survival situation when youíre in subzero temps or natural disaster a tow truck wonít be available. Shops wonít work because they donít have power or mechanics canít get to work. I donít want to be stranded because my truck or trailer broke down while bugging out. So, I bring some extra tools. Also just pretend for a moment you are in a survival mode in a very rural area. Tools are a great bartering item and a great way to make friends and get favors from the people who thought being ultra-light was a bright idea.

Security/Communication- For security in my trailer I have a security system that relies on internet. This is useful for normal circumstances but in survival obviously internet and cell signal are not available. In that situation I have a new solid dead bolt and more deadly tools toÖ discourage unwanted guests. For normal circumstances I have Ubiquiti antennas to collect wifi and I am still deciding on what cellular router set up to do with. That could be an entire book long subject I am sure this forum covers. Simply put I will have a cellular router with external antennas and big data plan. Of course this only works under normal circumstances and that allows me to use an IP security system for convenience. I also have an old CB radio and cranking weather radio as backups if the grid is down. I plan to get a 2-way radio for my wife and I if we separate. Having modern day connectivity is great while you can have it. I personally believe in data protection and do not store anything sensitive in a cloud or store any of my security system in a cloud. I primarily use the data antennas for long distance remote connections. When it comes down to it chambering a snub nose is a great security system.

That was a lot! I got quite excited to talk about this topic. I hope you got the memo to have a backup and a backup to that backup. You can plan a prep but you also need to plan for that prep to fail. I like to know I have the gear and skills to survive on even the most basic primitive means if required so even if all fails I will be very upset but alive. I think an Airstream and travel trailer/RV in general is an awesome survival machine and allows you to have a great means of shelter and storage and a means of improving basics like food and water. I still will be comfortable living a normal life in my AS but if something happens I know I am ready for a lot of possibilities. Not everything though. Let me know your thoughts!
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Old 02-28-2021, 03:22 AM   #15
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1977 31' Sovereign
Rochester , WASHINGTON
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bhel View Post
I have experience in survival, mountaineering, camping off grid type situations as part of my normal life. I am also a prepper as well as having put thousands of hours of research into this topic and things related. I recently purchased a 78' Sovereign and have been fixing it up and making some renovations that I am in process of while living full time out of it with my wife. My intentions are an ultimate off grid survival machine... while also being quite cozy and comfy under normal conditions. I also am an experienced electrician and experience with construction in general. I love this topic so I will go through all my plans of things I have done and am doing to my trailer for how to make it ready to survive anything.

The Airstream- First and foremost you need a good trailer. I have spent a lot of time already fixing the frame and subfloor and some ribs and all kind of topics that this forum covers extensively. You need good bones and foundation of anything built for survival. The main thing I cover on this thread about the construction of the trailer is probably insulation. I am using a mix of spray foam and rockwool as well as radiant barriers. I personally think an XPS board type insulation is difficult in an airstream because of the curves. I do not have the patience to cut the boards like others to shape how it needs to and believe foam and wool will be better and easier at filling every tiny void. I will use layers of XPS in the floor where my tanks are, however. The trailer is your shelter in a survival situation so make sure it is going to keep the weather out and serve its purpose. I also think upgrading the suspension is very useful for off grid. Lift it 2in and put bigger wheels with off road capable tires on it. Not much you can do to the axles and shocks besides make sure they are working well.

Fuel- I have upgraded my 30lb LP tanks to 40lb giving me 80 total. Also, will have an extra 20lb tank in the truck as backup. In my truck I plan to upgrade the fuel cell to around 60gal as well as hold additional fuel on the truck. Haven't completely thought through how I will hold spare fuel. Tank in the bed, around the wheel well, underneath on the frame. I hope to have 80+ gal of fuel storing ability. If I am stationary for a long period of time, I will investigate local LP tank and delivery options for my camp site. In a survival mode I understand getting fuel will be near impossible. With an 80 or more gallons of fuel available I have 800-1000 mile range. I will wait and see how 100lb of propane storage does. Of course, all the fuel storing ability doesnít matter if you donít have the tanks filled up. As a rule of thumb I donít let my fuel level get below a third tank so if I need to get anywhere and canít get fuel, like say an evacuation, I will be ok until I can find fuel and have something in reserve for an unforeseen emergency. I have 80lb of attached propane and 60gal of attached gas tanks. The extra 20lb propane and 20gal gas tanks are the backups not to be used for normal daily use.

Heat A/C- My primary source of heat will be a small wood stove in the trailer. It is a more readily available and dryer form of heat that I can also cook on. In a survival situation propane eventually runs out and in a natural disaster propane will be difficult or next to impossible to get. Wood always works. Have the tools you need to collect more wood locally. I will still have my furnace and electric heaters to supplement heat or be backups if I am unable to get wood fuel. However, I will not rely on them as my only ways to have heat. If the wood stove isnít enough or I ran out of wood I can use my sleeping bags which will be more than enough even in subzero. I will be getting a skirt to go around the trailer as well to use in addition to the tank heaters to ensure protection and thermal insulation for the under side which helps a ton. I also will still use my roof top A/C with heat strip. Also have 12v roof vent fans as well for hot temperatures. In a severe heat survival situation opening windows and using fans will help but that's also where the good insulation really makes it bearable. Make sure to have good bug screens on everything that opens to the outside. In severe heat make sure to find a source of water and conserve body energy like only working during early morning and late night. In severe cold also conserve energy and do not overwork yourself into a sweat. I hate the heat so I avoid that when I can haha.

Cooking/Food- Propane is still my primary source of cooking on the range and I planned my system around conserving propane to be available for cooking because propane heat uses so much. I still use propane for the water heater as well. As a backup I can cook on a wood stove as well as open fire outdoors. Have the gear and skill to cook over an open fire. Propane will eventually run out. Another backup are my backpacking stoves that run on those little propane/butane tanks that I have a ton of. As far as food storage goes thatís my weakest point. I am a full time trailer dweller so I just donít have as much room. I have places in the trailer and my truck I store food, but I donít have some year or more stockpile filling up a bunker. Once the stored food rations run out, I have what I need to hunt, trap and fish. If I am going to be camped in the same place for a while in survival mode I would also grow food and I will have some basic planting and harvesting supplies and seed plus propagating is actually really useful.

Water- I upgraded my water tanks to 90 gal fresh and 46 gal grey that will be heated. No black because I will be using a compost toilet. My internal water filtration is a 3 stage and UV. In addition I use Big Berkey for naturally sourced water. I think a gravity fed water filter is a must. In survival mode with no propane and power and the tanks have frozen or ran out you need to source water and make it potable. For collecting rain runoff, ponds, natural spring water using a gravity filter requires no power. Gravity always works. I do not recommend river or lake water without a 3 stage and UV unless you are going to die because that water might kill you anyways haha. As another backup I have my backpacking water filters like mini pumping filter and tablets that would take much longer to use but will make it drinkable.

Power- I will have 1,100 watts of solar and 600ah of lithium batteries with a 3000w inverter that I hope to keep me powered up for my needs. I would still use hookups when I have that but I plan to camp off grid a lot. As a backup for power I have 2 Champion 2500w dual fuel generators that can be tied together like the Honda. I wanted duel fuel so I can use the 80gal of fuel or 100lb of propane I have depending on whatís more available. If I needed to conserve power because of limited sun light or whatever I can only use solar to power 12v basics like the water pump, lights, blower. I would want to keep the fridge going as long as I can on battery and propane but I can go without if I need to as I planned my food storage not needing it. As another backup to power I can just not have power. Wood still works, gravity still works and gathering food still works. It certainly is a primitive way of living, but, if youíre in survival mode and the propane is out, solar doesnít work, grid is down, water is empty you gotta do what you gotta do. With my background with electrical work I also think I could make a redneck hydroelectric generator if I could find the parts for a turbine haha.


Survival Gear- I carry all my backpacking gear with me which might seem counter intuitive. I got this trailer so I donít have to camp but I use the trailer as a base camp for backpacking too. Having all that gear is also a must for survival as well. As I mentioned having my sleeping bags and stoves and water filters are part of my backup plans. I carry compasses and maps in my pack that would be useful if I needed to go on foot to source water or food. First aid is also part of what I pack. I have a pretty beefy kit that has enough supplies to keep you alive from just about anything besides severely fatal wounds and I keep it in the trailer. I also have smaller 2 person 7 day kits I have in my packs and truck. You can only have so much first aid before you need specialized supplies and training. First and foremost, stay safe. Fatal wounds will be impossible to treat without a real ER and doctors. In a survival situation you will not be able to get to a hospital. Youíre on your own. Even if you paid 800 bucks and a monthly subscription for a fancy GPS with an SOS feature you canít rely on that when SHTF. So take precautions when doing something dangerous and if you are going to do something that risks your life and you donít have the skills to be safe do not do it. Another important thing is flashlights! I have a flashlight in every pack. Have at least 2 flashlights and 2 headlamps plus all the spare batteries. I do not like the type that as a built in rechargeable. I want to be able to remove and replace the battery if I need to. In a survival mode and I have no power I donít want to have just 5 hours of lights before the entire flashlight is totally useless. I have rechargeable CR123 and AAA I use on a normal basis but also tons of regular alkaline for backups for things. I also have a small backpacking solar panel to recharge small flashlight batteries. I few other very useful things I have in my pack to use in survival situations are emergency blankets, bivyís, fire starters, sun and bug sprays, poncho, water bottles and ropes. Carry any additional geo specific gear you might need for your area like ice climbing gear or a raft. I absolutely love having an inflatable raft in my pack and even if you think you would never go hiking in the snow, if you are forced to you will really wish you had snowshoes.
Clothing- I think this is a more obvious one. Have the clothes you need and thatís all you need. I believe in buying quality and not crappy stuff and to fix that you have not buy more. I am sort of brand loyal to Carhartt, 5.11 and North Face but thatís just me. Get a decent brand. Have the proper clothing for all 4 seasons. Have things for heavy rain/snow and extreme cold even if you live in central Texas haha. You need at least one really solid pair of boots and some high top water boots. Pro tip: have a good pair of gaiters those things are life savers. Storage is already limited in a trailer so itís much easier to only have what I need because thatís what I have room for. Iíd rather have storage for another weeksí worth of food than additional shirts and pants. No room for fashion here haha. Have a sewing kit to fix things and biodegradable soap for washing clothes in a river.
Tools- I am lucky to come from an electrical trade and have a lot of tools already. I have a hard time with this one because I just want to carry every tool I own. I would bring a table saw if I had room for it haha. Some believe in the method of being ultra light with gear and tools, but I am not among that belief. I carry a full socket and wrench set, screwdriver set, all sorts of pliers, power tool set, basic electrical kit, basic plumbing kit, saws and hammers, some other random stuff. About 3 toolboxes worth. This means I do not use 75% of my tools on a regular basis but I will be so glad I have it when I need it. I also carry all sorts of spare parts for electrical and plumbing things. In a survival situation if a pipe burst, furnace breaks, broken LP line you canít just bring it to the closest mothership for repairs. You canít rely on a dealer to fix your truck. In a survival situation when youíre in subzero temps or natural disaster a tow truck wonít be available. Shops wonít work because they donít have power or mechanics canít get to work. I donít want to be stranded because my truck or trailer broke down while bugging out. So, I bring some extra tools. Also just pretend for a moment you are in a survival mode in a very rural area. Tools are a great bartering item and a great way to make friends and get favors from the people who thought being ultra-light was a bright idea.

Security/Communication- For security in my trailer I have a security system that relies on internet. This is useful for normal circumstances but in survival obviously internet and cell signal are not available. In that situation I have a new solid dead bolt and more deadly tools toÖ discourage unwanted guests. For normal circumstances I have Ubiquiti antennas to collect wifi and I am still deciding on what cellular router set up to do with. That could be an entire book long subject I am sure this forum covers. Simply put I will have a cellular router with external antennas and big data plan. Of course this only works under normal circumstances and that allows me to use an IP security system for convenience. I also have an old CB radio and cranking weather radio as backups if the grid is down. I plan to get a 2-way radio for my wife and I if we separate. Having modern day connectivity is great while you can have it. I personally believe in data protection and do not store anything sensitive in a cloud or store any of my security system in a cloud. I primarily use the data antennas for long distance remote connections. When it comes down to it chambering a snub nose is a great security system.

That was a lot! I got quite excited to talk about this topic. I hope you got the memo to have a backup and a backup to that backup. You can plan a prep but you also need to plan for that prep to fail. I like to know I have the gear and skills to survive on even the most basic primitive means if required so even if all fails I will be very upset but alive. I think an Airstream and travel trailer/RV in general is an awesome survival machine and allows you to have a great means of shelter and storage and a means of improving basics like food and water. I still will be comfortable living a normal life in my AS but if something happens I k now I am ready for a lot of possibilities. Not everything though. Let me know your thoughts!
Well done! This is why I started this thread.So people won't have the "victim" mentality like we saw in Texas recently.You are responsible for your safety and survival.
I've had a 31 Landyacht like yours,full time on private land, 3+ 1/2 yrs.Im all electric, but the 100# propane tanks are great backups.
Good move on the Big Berkey, I've got one.Purest water possible, all biological removed.
I put LT 235/75/R15 s on this, aggressive tred Hankook's on this, pulls like it's on a rail, doesn't twitch, hugs the road.
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Old 02-28-2021, 05:05 AM   #16
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Wishing you well with this thread. May I suggest that it is not necessary to "Quote" the last poster, if your new comment is next in line?

Not exactly a "survival" issue . . . but it makes life a bit more efficient for all IMO.



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Old 02-28-2021, 07:37 AM   #17
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Well done! This is why I started this thread.So people won't have the "victim" mentality like we saw in Texas recently.You are responsible for your safety and survival.
This kind of thing repeats itself in your posts, seems wholly unnecessary, political in nature and unenlightened.

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Old 02-28-2021, 07:44 AM   #18
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Wow! Thanks bhel! Lot's of good ideas there.
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Old 02-28-2021, 08:18 AM   #19
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This kind of thing repeats itself in your posts, seems wholly unnecessary, political in nature and unenlightened.

Maggie
Its exactly what happened.The truth now, somehow ,is the worst thing possible to some people.
"Personal responsibility "must never be uttered, someone will be offended.
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Old 02-28-2021, 09:31 AM   #20
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A gentle reminder that the Community Rules [linked in the blue menu bar at the bottom of every page]:

https://www.airforums.com/forums/mis...ork&page=rules

. . . are good to read on these matters IMO. In part the rules state:

"Discussions, statements and images that are political in nature or reference general government policies, weaponry, gun rights and religion are not allowed in ANY area of the forum. Discussions about current or pending legislation or regulations, weapons and religion that directly pertain to RVing are acceptable but will be closed or removed if they wander off topic or become disruptive."

At times, some threads are closed because [it appears IMO] that the discussions had gotten too heated, political, etc.:

For example . . . "Boondocking safe?" --

https://www.airforums.com/forums/f38...fe-218768.html

In my personal opinion, that closed thread contained a valuable discussion which, in spite of some posters warning about the thread maybe being closed, has now been ended, resulting in a loss for everyone. [IMO]

More generally the Community Rules point out:

" . . . This forum is not a democracy; it is privately owned and we make the rules. If rules are violated we retain the right at our discretion to remove, edit or delete posts and if necessary ban or remove members. Any abuse toward our staff may/will result in immediate suspension of your account"

Happy trails.
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