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Old 08-26-2006, 12:05 PM   #1
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Lug Nut Socket Help...

Ok so I searched this Forum but couldn't find the exact info I need. And my AS is in storage so I turn to you for help.

I recently had all four of my original tires replaced so frequent and proper torque on the wheels has my attention since we are heading out next week.

Here is what I know, and maybe you guys can fill in the rest:

I have a '05 Safari with Aluminum wheels
proper torque per my owners handbook is 110-120 lbs
I need to buy the appropriate torque wrench because my current one is up to 80 lbs.
I've read on other posts I'll need a 3-6" extender to clear the wheels.
Which one is it? 3" or 6”?
I assume the torque wrench I'll buy will be a ˝” drive and I don't own any ˝” sockets and really don't need a whole set so...
WHAT size socket fits the lugs on these wheels?
WHAT is the proper depth to fit my lug nuts?

Greatly appreciate your input....
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Old 08-26-2006, 12:35 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AZstreamin
I've read on other posts I'll need a 3-6" extender to clear the wheels.
Which one is it? 3" or 6”?
Hi AZstreamin,

Get a 6" or even a 10" extension.
I don't want to venture a guess as to the size of the socket,lots of variables.


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Old 08-26-2006, 12:49 PM   #3
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The Lug nuts take a 3/4" socket. Get a six-sided; it has less tendency to round the lug nut than a twelve-sided. I use a 4" extension on the torque wrench with a 1/2" drive. I also have a six and a ten inch extension, and find the four inch easier to handle. The larger extensions have a tendency to get off center. I have the same wheels as you do.
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Old 08-26-2006, 01:27 PM   #4
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It is either a 3/4" OR a 13/16" nut, depending on nut type, wheels, axle rating, etc. The best course of action is to buy a single 1/2" drive 3/4"x13/16" flip socket (different size on either end), and a 6" long 1/2" extension, and be done with it. They are available from most auto parts stores, and Sears locations. I say either because our trailer has 13/16" lug nuts, but several Airstream coaches I have worked on have had 3/4" nuts, this way you cover both bases, and will be able to fit replacement lug nuts, if they have a different hex, without buying another socket.
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Old 08-26-2006, 01:34 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by moosetags
The larger extensions have a tendency to get off center.
Very true, but you can gently support the head of the torque wrench with the palm of your other hand without affecting the accuracy. I need the 10" to clear the body and save them knuckles.





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Old 08-26-2006, 02:29 PM   #6
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Torque wrench

Swing by sears and grab a dial in handle wrench. I have a 3/4 drive. You turn a knob that sets your torques setting. It'll click when they are torqued. When done reset the knob to zero or you will take the wrench out of adjustment.

Extension: I use a three inch one because there is a formula with torque wrenches and the length of the extension plays a part. The shorter the extension the less the affect on actual torque reading. A three inch extension in nominal on the formula.

Socket: Get a deep socket IMHO. Easier all around.
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Old 08-26-2006, 04:29 PM   #7
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Ask and you shall receive

Thank you torquers for the input I'll buy one tomorrow. One other question.. The other torque wrench I bought a couple of months ago for my equal-i-zer hitch adjustments was an inexpensive dial torque wrench from a store like AutoZone. It was $35 or $40. I have an appreciation for high-end products and I know these cheap tools are not US made like Craftsman or Snap-on for the serious mechanic. I also appreciate the ‘you get what you pay for’ statement so with all of that said, for this lug nut application, and that is likely the only thing this wrench will be used for, it will stay in the AS along with my other dedicated AS tools. Is a basic no name brand torque wrench like I mentioned above accurate and appropriate for this job? Or am I just over analyzing something that doesn't need analysis?
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Old 08-26-2006, 04:53 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AZstreamin
I also appreciate the ‘you get what you pay for’ statement so with all of that said, for this lug nut application, and that is likely the only thing this wrench will be used for, it will stay in the AS along with my other dedicated AS tools.
You can't beat a Craftsman 1/2" drive, "click style" for about $70
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Old 08-26-2006, 05:47 PM   #9
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I find the Harbor Freight torque wrench at $13 does fine for this job
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...itemnumber=239
Mine came with a nice carrying case that will hold the extension and the socket.
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Old 08-26-2006, 06:04 PM   #10
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My ’06 Safari had 3/4” Lug nuts. But the nuts have a chrome sheet metal cap or covering, probably for cosmetic reasons. First time I attempted to remove a leaking tire I did not use a deep socket. That was a mistake because I stripped that covering off the real lug nut. The real steel nut is a somewhat smaller odd ball size (I don’t have the exact size at this time.) Anyway I just jammed the metal cap back on and removed the nut with a deep socket. When the time comes to replace the tires, I’ll replace all those dumb lug nut with simple one-piece high quality lug nuts.

BTW: My new Suburban has black plastic caps on all 32 lug nuts, which requires 140 ft.lb. of torque. They better hold up under the stress of sheer force. I added a Harbor Freight torque wrench to my tool box and it appears to work well.
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Old 08-26-2006, 06:13 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by S C Streamer
You can't beat a Craftsman 1/2" drive, "click style" for about $70
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I concur with Mark. I had little experience with torque wenches but had Craftsman tools. The one Mark recommends works well for the wheels. I believe my owner's manual on 2006 says torque to 95 lbs.
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Old 08-26-2006, 06:30 PM   #12
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You may want to consider what the torque rating is for your TV also , it's probably higher than the trailer . This way you will only need one . TV wheels should be checked periodically too , or when rotating tires
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Old 08-26-2006, 07:48 PM   #13
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Hi AZstreaming- -It appears your questions were answered and with good advice. But here is a related question: How does the average guy with the ordinary collection of tools calibrate a torque wrench? Can we Airstreamers be sure that we are torquing the nuts correctly and measuring that torque accurately?

Other than using a system of weights, a pull and a lever arm against a scale or some kind. Or perhaps connecting it to another torque wrench, which we know is calibrated. I don’t mean to answer my own question, but…..

It seams that another question has appeared which is: Is an under $20 torque wrench just a good as a $70 one if we can ensure that both can be calibrated and adjusted to do the job within spec? Or is it best to fall back on the “You get what you pay for” and assume the retail price should be primary and prudent criteria? The actual manufacturing locations and costs are unknowns and might not matter if the objective is to accurately torque the lug nuts to the spec.
I bet someone on the forum knows how to calibrate a torque wrench.
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Old 08-26-2006, 09:01 PM   #14
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i have three of the old fashioned moving arm type of torque wrenches.

they work just fine and will not suffer if dropped! i'm more of a rock and stick guy when it comes to these things. simple is sometimes better.

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