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Old 05-16-2011, 12:42 PM   #15
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Some people get the Rib and are happy with them. They have a sturdier sidewall than the LTX and that may help with lateral pressure on the trailer—primarily while backing or if the trailer is susceptible to sway. The idea of ST tires was a stronger sidewall reduced sway.

But, we have no sway issues with the LTX. The Rib is made for commercial trucks and to be used for many, many miles because they are designed to be recapped one or more times. Basically for local travel, but a lot of it. I don't think this compares to trailer use.

We are now at 21,000+ miles with the Michelins on the trailer—my wife just updated me on the miles. After wintering (6 months) the Michelins had lost no air; all were the same pressure. The Marathons always lost air over time, especially if traveling.

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Old 05-16-2011, 12:54 PM   #16
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I have been using the XPS LRE 16 Rib on my Sprinter service van for 3 years and 78,000 miles. The van weight around 8000 lbs. and they have given me great service at 80PSI rear and 790PSI front. They are just now beginning to show significant wear on the shoulders. The ride would be graded 'satisfactory' and not harsh in any way. I will definitely put them on the new '11 Sprinter when the OEM Contis (garbage ride) wear a little more.
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Old 05-16-2011, 02:51 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lewster View Post
they have given me great service at 80PSI rear and 790PSI front. They are just now beginning to show significant wear on the shoulders.
Lew, with 790 PSI in a tire I sure would expect wear in the center instead of the shoulders. I'm surprised the tire could hold air at those pressures.

I could not resist.

But more seriously, isn't the Rib designed more for a use like a service van than for a trailer? And any Michelin, Rib or LTX has got to better than the "garbage" OEM tires.

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Old 05-16-2011, 04:25 PM   #18
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Ahhhhh, isn't a slip of the keyboard wonderful! That was 70 PSI

I think HowieE uses ribs on his trailer. I had Goodrich Commercial T/A 16" LRE on the 19CCD and they were great. Had them on the Sprinter also, but preferred the ride and handling of the Ribs on the van over the T/As.
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Old 06-07-2011, 09:16 AM   #19
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Hey All,

See previous post earlier in tread from Rossfam05BH for context.

Just returned from my trip across country to pick up a 1989 34' Excella. I installed 6 p235/75/15 Michelin LTX M/S 2 tires before leaving California for my trip back to North Carolina. Tire pressure was set at 50 psi, which is the max listed on the side-wall for these "extra-load" tires. I also installed a new Propride Hitch for the trip. Towed at 65 mph all of the way, except of course in CA where the speed is restricted to 55 mph for trucks towing trailers. Towed perfectly. Tires ran cool, never rising more than 20 degrees above ambient air temperature. The true test for the setup happened in Nebraska on I-80 when 25 mph crosswinds from the south were encountered. I had no problem controlling the rig and staying in my chosen lane of traffic. After 2900 miles, I feel the Michelin tires were an appropriate choice for our "new" three axle trailer. I don't think these tires would function as well on a two axle rig, such as our 30' Bunkhouse where I have installed Michelin 16" XPS Ribs.

BTW, I need to thank Sean Woodruff at Propride for running his business in such a profession manner. I had the new Propride hitch sent to CA, and the truck end of the adjustable stinger did not make it to CA from MI. I called Sean, and without hesitation he offered to ship a replacement part overnight, which I am sure cut into his profit margin. I received the part the next day and I then left for NC. Sean now has my business for life, and I will be replacing our Hensley on our 30' Bunkhouse. Anybody need a Hensley?

Bye

Paul
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Old 06-08-2011, 11:40 AM   #20
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Paul,

Glad you are happy with your tires and you may be the only person to observe the trailer speed limit in California.

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Old 06-08-2011, 12:51 PM   #21
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From a person that just went from the LTX/MS to the LTX/MS2 (1K bucks, lifetime rot. bal. tax,dis, etc...) I was told the LTX/MS2 is replacing the LTX/MS. Better overall tread wear, handling, etc... plus the MS2 comes with a 70K mile warr. to boot! Where the old LTX/MS did not. I will say the MS2 do handle a little different than the LTX/MS. My guess, Michelin knew that most of the SUV running the older LTX/MS never went into a bunch of mud or snow and thus decided to make a better riding tire for the SUV/Trucks running them.

Time will tell and I've got a 70K warr. to find out.

Just remember one thing, a mud tire and a snow tire are two different things, one you want the tread to clean itself as it's rotates, the other you don't so I've never understood how you can have a tire that is both. Maybe someday I will learn how.

They were placed on a 2002 Ford Excusion, 7.3 4X4 with 235K on the OD.
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Old 06-08-2011, 01:07 PM   #22
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Michelin told me recently that the M/S 2 won't be out in the 225/75/16 size until the end of 2012. Until then only the M/S 1 is available in that size.
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Old 06-08-2011, 01:31 PM   #23
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People who love mud and go 4 wheeling looking for it get tires with big lugs usually available in bias ply only. Chains might work better and when we used to go into the Utah remote areas, we did carry chains for our M+S tires. Having experienced 2" of clay mud stuck to my tires and resultant control issues, I though a cheap set of chains would help if all else failed. We don't do that anymore.

A mud and snow tire doesn't have those big lugs but will get you through some mud.

I always thought the idea for either way was a self cleaning tires and that's why they used softer rubber on snows.

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Old 06-08-2011, 01:56 PM   #24
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Gene,

I read in a 4x4 mag one time that a mud tire was to "clean" the tread as it rotates thus allowing for digging/traction in the mud to keep you going.

On a snow tire, you don't want the tread to clean itself rather than have the tread keep a nice thin layer of snow in the tread giving more traction.

Think about what happens when you rub snow and rubber together (it slides) vs. rubbing two snowballs together (they stick).

I guess thats why the people up north put snow tires on in the winter.
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Old 06-10-2011, 01:00 PM   #25
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Paul, maybe the idea is the snow tires are engineered to clean some of the snow between the lugs. With wet snow or mud, the spaces get filled fast and there is no effective tread unless the lugs move and expel the snow or mud. Dry snow and very cold temps are best for traction. With a good M+S tire, I can feel the tires grab the snow when it is deep. In my experience, mud is much worse than snow for traction. Deep sand is interesting and driving as if it is powdery snow is my approach. Nothing is worse than ice and wet snow can turn to wet ice between the lugs.

Snow tires used to wear out fast, but now they last for many years. SUV's and light trucks used to come with LT M+S tires as OEM items. That has changed and you may get all season tires (they aren't good for real winters), passenger tires and cheap tires that wear out fast. Our 2006 4Runner came with Michelin Cross Terrain tires—they seemed to be somewhere between all season and M+S. But, they were great in snow, one time breaking trail up our 850' driveway through a foot of snow; snow was flying everywhere as if I was driving a plow and we drive uphill as if it were nothing. Ironically, when I went to replace them at 70,000 miles—they still had enough tread to keep them for a while, but I wanted new tires for the coming winter—Michelin no longer made them in that size, so I replaced with them with LTX M+S. Our experience has been Michelin's provide superior traction even when they are getting to replacement time. I've had tires that had a large reduction in traction even when they had decent tread left, but Michelin's don't do that.

Sometimes tire dealers try to sell "siping": http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siping_(rubber) Once you read the article, you can see there is disagreement about the effect of siping. The principle is that the more slits in the lugs, the more they move cleaning out snow and thus increasing traction; there's more to it than that, of course.

So, there are so many different conditions a tire has to deal with, no one tire is going to do it all. For those who want to experience the mud season in the back country of Utah, mud tires or chains are necessary. Last time I ran into that problem, we turned (slid) around and slowly went back to pavement, stayed in a motel and waited for the road to dry out. With 2" of mud stuck to our tires and a drop off on one side, this was scary. Turning around was very difficult. After that time, I got used chains from someone, but never had to use them.

Tires are made so much better now than decades ago, I'm not sure the old rules apply.

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Old 06-10-2011, 01:18 PM   #26
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Gene,

I will say, I've always been happy with the LTX/MS. I have a Ford 250 7.3 4x4, Crew (285 on the OD) and the Excursion 4x4 7.3 (over 200K on the OD) and have always had the LTX/MS on them except for the original rubber (Steeltex Firestone) and ran them on a Toyota Land Crusher(1992) for over 300K.

I have a simple rule, buy the LTX/MS, rotate twice and replace at 70K miles on them. By that time, you're starting to hit the wear marker and either winter or State inspection is coming up anyway and that's a great time to buy new ones!
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Old 08-24-2016, 06:32 PM   #27
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Anyone with the Michelin LTX MS2 tires believing they are a Mud and Snow tire.... you might want to re-read your literature.
They most specifically ARE NOT rated for snow. In fact, they have one of the worst reputations on wet grass and snow. (They do NOT display the DOT "triangle", required for the snow rating.)

I have these tires on my truck and I believe they are fine for pavement. But the "M" and "S" I believe stand for SMOKE & MIRRORS.
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Old 08-24-2016, 08:42 PM   #28
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I have driven on both versions of the M+S tire in wet snow, deep snow, power snow, ice and even on wet icy grass. They have excellent traction even when the tread is pretty worn. Yes, I am aware they are not snow rated, but apparently the snow doesn't know that.

I see my last posts on this thread were five years ago. If I bought tires then, it might be time to replace them.

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