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Old 10-04-2017, 07:42 PM   #201
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1976 31' Sovereign
Mill Valley , California
Join Date: Dec 2016
Posts: 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joebanjo View Post
Greetings..

I faced the same problem with my 1976 Ambassador. The double pane glass had fogged on all the windows. The opening sashes are $450.00 from Airstream, making replacing them pretty darn costly! After purchasing three single pane replacements from Airstream, I found that I could rebuild my old double pane "take offs" to single pane configuration for about $15.00 each.
I felt pretty stupid buying over $1200.00 worth of window sashes from Airstream when I could have easily rebuilt my old ones for a fraction of the cost. Now...that being said, keep in mind that Airstream gave up on the notion of "Double pane" windows for their trailers, long ago. They are troublesome and prone to the same problems the factory models faced ( fogging, pealing, leaking).
My process involves converting the double pane sash channel to a single pane width, purchasing new "U" gasket, and reassembling the sash as a single pane version, using the larger outer pane ( the inner pane is slightly smaller). I have rebuilt all of my takeoffs and now have a surplus of windows for my trailer.
The stack windows on my trailer were of the "plexi-glass" inner pane construction. I simply cut the inner panes out with a small dremel bit, being EXTREMELY!!!!! careful not to touch the outer pane ( doing so will shatter the outer tempered glass faster than a "Bluegrass banjo picker leaving an algebra class"). The space where the inner "Stack" window pane was , would then be sealed with windshield "bedding tape". The process worked for me beautifully with no leaks, no drips...and no errors....:-)
Mike
I have photos of most of the process I will be happy to share with you if you want.
JoBanjo,
Not sure if you are still on Airstream Forum but I would love to know how to remake my double "pained" windows into single.
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Old 03-18-2018, 07:57 AM   #202
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1974 29' Ambassador
Astoria , Oregon
Join Date: Mar 2018
Posts: 7
Brand spankin’ new to my Airdream. 1974 29’ILY. I would like to repair all of my windows to retain double pane. I understood the little white pieces I see inside as spacers to hold at what I read to be 3/16”. Is that correct? I see plenty of info on dismantling, any insight on putting them back together? Also, many say to use Vulkem, is this prior to sealing the edge with Butyl? To fill the gap?
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Old 03-19-2018, 03:14 PM   #203
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1976 31' Sovereign
Mill Valley , California
Join Date: Dec 2016
Posts: 19
You will use a shimmed butyl to achieve the gap. I bought everything I needed from vintage trailer supply. I looked for the blog I used as reference and it is no longer active, so sorry. If you message me your email address I can send you my purchase list and how I did windows.
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Old 03-21-2018, 06:48 AM   #204
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1974 29' Ambassador
Astoria , Oregon
Join Date: Mar 2018
Posts: 7
Thanks so much! I am intimidated by these windows to be honest. I’m replacing my floor so window failure would be a bummmer. I’m doing them first, then I’ll pressure wash to affirm that they’re solid!
Susythepainter@gmail.com
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Old 03-28-2018, 07:18 AM   #205
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1975 31' Sovereign
Mount Juliet , Tennessee
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 2
The windows can definitely be redone. It's been two years since I did mine and have had no problems. Here's a grocery list of what you'll need.

Vintage Trailer Supply
Code Item Qty Price Grand Total
VTS-634L Polyshim II Butyl Tape - 3/16" Thick X 25 Feet $19.00

Amazon
3M 08693 Auto Glass Urethane Windshield Adhesive Cartridge - 10.5 fl. oz. $14.48

Amazon
3M 08682 Single Step Primer - 30 ml $18.28

Harbor Freight
Air Vacuum Pump with R134A and R12 Connectors - $17.99

Here's the assembly process in a nutshell:

You're going to sandwich the butyl spacer between the two panes of glass. Offset the butyl spacer about 1/8" from the edge of the glass.
Use masking tape as a guide so the spacer goes on in a straight line.
Place a few pieces of silica gel (the stuff in packets in new shoe boxes) in the middle of the glass. They will stay in between the two pieces of glass and absorb any moisture.
Once the spacer is all the way around one piece of glass, remove the masking tape and carefully place the second piece of glass to make the sandwich.
You should now have a small groove 1/8" deep around the entire glass.
Apply the primer in that groove and allow to dry.
Then fill in the gap with the adhesive caulk and use your finger to smooth around the edge.
Let is dry completely then trim off excess with a razor blade.
Find a spot where the spacer went around the glass and butted up against itself. Here you will draw a slight vacuum.
Attach a needle (one that you use to fill up a basketball) to the vacuum pump and insert into the small space.
Attach the vacuum pump to an air compressor and pull a slight vacuum. You will see the panes squeeze together slightly.
When you pull the needle out, have a small piece of butyl to seal the hole then put some adhesive over the butyl.

When you are reassembling be sure to clean the aluminum frames because any small obstructions will cause it to bind. I had to assembly the first frame with a rubber mallet and that scare the crap out of me. The second one I got smarter and pre-greased the frames with WD-40. No rubber mallet was needed.

This is all from memory over two years ago but I hope it helps.

I still have the primer and the vacuum pump. They're yours if you want to pay shipping. It should save you a couple bucks. I'm sure the adhesive has dried in the tube by now but if not, you can have that too.
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Old 03-28-2018, 08:30 AM   #206
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1974 29' Ambassador
Astoria , Oregon
Join Date: Mar 2018
Posts: 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by TennesseeTin View Post
The windows can definitely be redone. It's been two years since I did mine and have had no problems. Here's a grocery list of what you'll need.

Vintage Trailer Supply
Code Item Qty Price Grand Total
VTS-634L Polyshim II Butyl Tape - 3/16" Thick X 25 Feet $19.00

Amazon
3M 08693 Auto Glass Urethane Windshield Adhesive Cartridge - 10.5 fl. oz. $14.48

Amazon
3M 08682 Single Step Primer - 30 ml $18.28

Harbor Freight
Air Vacuum Pump with R134A and R12 Connectors - $17.99

Here's the assembly process in a nutshell:

You're going to sandwich the butyl spacer between the two panes of glass. Offset the butyl spacer about 1/8" from the edge of the glass.
Use masking tape as a guide so the spacer goes on in a straight line.
Place a few pieces of silica gel (the stuff in packets in new shoe boxes) in the middle of the glass. They will stay in between the two pieces of glass and absorb any moisture.
Once the spacer is all the way around one piece of glass, remove the masking tape and carefully place the second piece of glass to make the sandwich.
You should now have a small groove 1/8" deep around the entire glass.
Apply the primer in that groove and allow to dry.
Then fill in the gap with the adhesive caulk and use your finger to smooth around the edge.
Let is dry completely then trim off excess with a razor blade.
Find a spot where the spacer went around the glass and butted up against itself. Here you will draw a slight vacuum.
Attach a needle (one that you use to fill up a basketball) to the vacuum pump and insert into the small space.
Attach the vacuum pump to an air compressor and pull a slight vacuum. You will see the panes squeeze together slightly.
When you pull the needle out, have a small piece of butyl to seal the hole then put some adhesive over the butyl.

When you are reassembling be sure to clean the aluminum frames because any small obstructions will cause it to bind. I had to assembly the first frame with a rubber mallet and that scare the crap out of me. The second one I got smarter and pre-greased the frames with WD-40. No rubber mallet was needed.

This is all from memory over two years ago but I hope it helps.

I still have the primer and the vacuum pump. They're yours if you want to pay shipping. It should save you a couple bucks. I'm sure the adhesive has dried in the tube by now but if not, you can have that too.
Wow, this is above and beyond what I expected as far as help goes. Thank you so much!
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Old 06-24-2018, 05:46 PM   #207
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1975 31' Sovereign
1987 30' Airstream 300
Powassan , Ontario
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 43
Images: 1
Thanks, Zeppelinium.

A year ago I popped out the curb side double pane window beside the door, took it apart, cleaned it all up, and thought, “omg, what have I done!”. Then I stared at the parts for a year. Finally attempted to put it all together with the careful guidance of this thread, and some muscle from from the hubster, and it worked beautifully. I’ll admit, it was nerve-wracking when it came to finally squeezing it all back in together, and a lot of patience, but worth it for the difference it made from grungy old window to something we can see out of.
The pre-shimmed butyl came from a company in Canada, I could buy it by the foot. I’ll try to attach link here, and I bought silica packets from amazon for between the panes instead of applying a film between the double panes (thinking i’ll Apply a film on the exterior of the panes so when they degrade I won’t have to take this window out again EVER) lol. One down, five to go...Thank you to everyone on this forum but especially Zeppelinium!
*PS i’ve Had this thread book-marked so long that I hadn’t seen ant any replies from 2018! Good job, Tennessee Tin and everyone else too. Nice to see so others offering their invaluable help!
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