Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 09-11-2004, 01:35 AM   #15
1 Rivet Short
 
krowsea's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by laurandwayne
Thanks all for responding to my questions. I'm just returning from Indianapolis all week and haven't had time to reply. This gives me alot to think about. I want to first determine the status of transmission cooler and oil cooler. How will I know for sure what the truck has and doesn't have. I do know it is equipped with a huge, looks like aftermarket aluminum, radiator and two identical rectangular, radiator looking units mounted infront of the radiator. Are these the cooling units for the oil and tranny?
Wayne
Wayne, One is probably the air conditioning condenser (closest to the radiator) and the other is probably an engine oil cooler (closest to grill). They sometimes put a trans cooler there in front, but it's not common, usually allowing the trans fluid to go through the radiator while the engine oil goes through the external cooler.

John-Boy
__________________

__________________
Sarchasm (n): The gulf between the author of sarcastic wit and the person who doesn't get it.


1975 31' Sovereign
2004 Dodge Ram 2500 'Laramie', HEMI
krowsea is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2004, 04:43 PM   #16
3 Rivet Member
 
wayne.yl's Avatar
 
1977 31' Sovereign
1992 34' Excella
Currently Looking...
Salem , Oregon
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 168
Images: 5
John-boy
After more investigating, I have determinedthat the transmissions fluid lines run forward to the radiator area. One line runs into the radiator and the other run into the bottom of a smaller rectangular unit. Another line comes out of this unit and runs into the radiator also. The other small rectangular unit has two lines running from it to the oil filter mount. This leads me to believe You were right in that one unit is the oil cooler. Can I assume the other small unit is some sort of transmission cooler or not?
Thanks wayne
__________________

__________________
wayne.yl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2004, 10:37 PM   #17
1 Rivet Short
 
krowsea's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by laurandwayne
John-boy
After more investigating, I have determinedthat the transmissions fluid lines run forward to the radiator area. One line runs into the radiator and the other run into the bottom of a smaller rectangular unit. Another line comes out of this unit and runs into the radiator also. The other small rectangular unit has two lines running from it to the oil filter mount. This leads me to believe You were right in that one unit is the oil cooler. Can I assume the other small unit is some sort of transmission cooler or not?
Thanks wayne
Hi Wayne,

The trans cooler sounds like an aftermarket addition by a previous owner. Does it look like a series of stacked plates, or an 'S' shaped tube with fins, and what dimensions? If the oil cooler has hard metal lines running to the oil filter area, then it's a factory installed unit. If the lines are rubber or braided steel, then it to is an aftermarket item. If your truck does not have air conditioning, then there will not be a condensor in front of the radiator. If your truck does have air, then there's another, much large cooler type piece attached directly to the front of the radiator, that would be the A/C condensor.

John-Boy
__________________
Sarchasm (n): The gulf between the author of sarcastic wit and the person who doesn't get it.


1975 31' Sovereign
2004 Dodge Ram 2500 'Laramie', HEMI
krowsea is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2004, 02:47 PM   #18
3 Rivet Member
 
wayne.yl's Avatar
 
1977 31' Sovereign
1992 34' Excella
Currently Looking...
Salem , Oregon
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 168
Images: 5
Hey John-boy
Thanks for walking me through this. The dimensions of both the oil cooler in question and the trans cooler are approx. the same. About 18in. long and 12in. tall. The air conditioning condensor is betweeen them and the front of the radiator. The lines to the oil cooler are rubber and appear to have aluminum fittings like those used on air conditioning systems. The units themselves look like thin plates stacked together. Do you think the trans cooler is adequete ? I have a concern about this because I was blowing the dirt off the air filter and found what looked to be transmission fluid in the air filter pan. the only explanation I can think of is that the transmission fluid overheated on our last trip and overflowed out the dip stick tube. The top of this tube is located directly next to the air filter pan. Is this overflow possible?
Wayne
__________________
wayne.yl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2004, 06:20 PM   #19
1 Rivet Short
 
krowsea's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by laurandwayne
Hey John-boy
Thanks for walking me through this. The dimensions of both the oil cooler in question and the trans cooler are approx. the same. About 18in. long and 12in. tall. The air conditioning condensor is betweeen them and the front of the radiator. The lines to the oil cooler are rubber and appear to have aluminum fittings like those used on air conditioning systems. The units themselves look like thin plates stacked together. Do you think the trans cooler is adequete ? I have a concern about this because I was blowing the dirt off the air filter and found what looked to be transmission fluid in the air filter pan. the only explanation I can think of is that the transmission fluid overheated on our last trip and overflowed out the dip stick tube. The top of this tube is located directly next to the air filter pan. Is this overflow possible?
Wayne
Hi Wayne,

Your trans cooler sounds like it is perfect for what you need, right type and right size. The oil in the air filter is common on older engines, and is engine oil not trans fluid. It will look similar because it has been hot and is usually a thin film rather than a deep dark pool. In an engine with a lot of crankcase pressure, usually due to piston rings worn or not seated correctly, an oil mist is present in the valve covers and upper lifter valley. This is usually brought into the air filter through the crankcase vent hose, the rubber and/or metal hose going from the valve cover to the air filter. There is a cotton filter inside the air filter that the hose connects to. Under normal circumstances, this will be dusty dirty due to airborne debris. Yours is probably oil soaked. You may also want to check the PVC valve out. It's in the opposite valve cover and goes to the base of the carb or throttle body. If you pull it out of the valve cover, you should be able to shake it and hear it rattle.

John-Boy
__________________
Sarchasm (n): The gulf between the author of sarcastic wit and the person who doesn't get it.


1975 31' Sovereign
2004 Dodge Ram 2500 'Laramie', HEMI
krowsea is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2004, 09:21 AM   #20
Rivet Master
 
59toaster's Avatar
 
1959 22' Caravanner
Atlanta , Georgia
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 2,197
Images: 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by laurandwayne
I finally bought one. Not the tow vehicle that I mentioned above. Instead I found a '90 suburban 350ci w/ tbi and a 1ton rearend kit added by the previous owner. After driving it, I couldn't pass it up. The miles are high, 175k, but it has been well taken care of. I put my first 500mile trip on it over the labor day weekend. Went off without a hitch. no pun intended. She rides a little rough but I reallly didn't feel the trailer much. Except for going up some steeper grades she pulled great at around 60-65mph. Questions. Can I do anything to get more horsepower? Engine temp was around 200-210 is this okay? Can I get better gas mileage than 8.5 mpg?
Thanks wayne
Millage seems low. My 454 powered 88 with 3.73 rear end and TH400 (no OD) gets 8.5 as a grocery hopper. Out on the road it will do 10.5 with 5600lb in tow. By itself it does 11.5. Thos Miles are verified via GPS on the hwy and the odometer appears to be acurate withing .5 for every 100 miles traveled. Your truck with the Over drive (unless it was swapped) should get near 15 without a trailer.

Did the owner correct for Spedometer error when swapping the axle? the typical 1500 got a 3.42 gear factory. The default gear in a 1 ton 14 bolt axle is 4.10 but 4.56 is pretty common as well. A 1 ton would not be a direct bolt in. It would require new spring purches. A 3/4 ton is a direct bolt in and the default gear is a 3.73. The difference between the two 14bolt FF rear ends is the Size of the brakes and the spring mounts on the SRW variation.

There are two "14 bolt" corprate axles. There is the 14 Full floater available as a 3/4. SRW 1 ton and a Drw 1 Ton. There is also the 14 semi floater that came in both 6 and 8 lug. It is concidered a 3/4 ton axle and still a big improvement over the 10bolt. Have you positivly Identified what you have and the Gear ratio?

In the glove box is the RPO build sticker that will list everying about that truck. G and H codes are axle and suspension related.
http://www.chuckschevytruckpages.com...s_1973-87.html
That will let you figure out what it came with as far as gear ratio. Then figure out what you currently have and you can get an idea if the Speedometer is off.
__________________
1959 22' Caravanner
1988 R20 454 Suburban.
Atlanta, GA
59toaster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2004, 10:27 AM   #21
3 Rivet Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 132
Images: 2
LauraandWayne

I own an '89 GMC 1500 with 350 TBI and the 3.41 rear-end. Around town I get 13.5 mpg and about 10 while towing 31' AS.

I found a satisfactory solution: K&N air filter and synthetic motor oil and transmission fluid. Mountain climbing in western Virginia became much easier with the K&N filter. Note-K&N uses a red colored oil to treat the filter after its periodic cleaning!

I use synthetics because they are better in the cold and hot temperatures than are the standard oils. I am a performance nut, not one to use synthetics to extend the oil change intervals beyond 3,000 miles. Yes, I pay more for the synthetic oils, but I think the payback is better performance and longer engine life.

My engine temperature gauge stays at 190 on level ground at 60 mph and climbs to 205 on hills. Slight grades seem to make no difference in engine temperatures.

Rick
__________________
Rick Alston is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2004, 02:42 PM   #22
3 Rivet Member
 
wayne.yl's Avatar
 
1977 31' Sovereign
1992 34' Excella
Currently Looking...
Salem , Oregon
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 168
Images: 5
59Toaster
I'm trying to get in touch w/ p/o but until now no word about the speciific rearend. Hope this isn't a bad sign. Anyway, is there another route to determining the type axle and gears on the burb?
Wayne
__________________
wayne.yl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2004, 05:21 PM   #23
2 Rivet Member
 
1986 34' Limited
South Lake Tahoe , California
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 30
I'm the lite weight

I tow my '86 34 ft limited (7400lbs) with a Chev 1500 with the off road and towing package; it has a 5.3 L engine and auto trans. and the lower geared rear end. I get about 14 mpg under most conditions and 17-19 when not pulling the trailer. I do use a load leveling system and generally carry 250 to 500lbs in the bed of the truck. I have no trouble towing this up mountain roads. I do have the transmission, transfer case, and deferentials serviced each year ($300 is cheaper than buying a bigger truck). You could get better mileage with a Chev 2500 with the Duramax and the Allison trans. You would generally get about 17 mpg even up hill. But the price of the truck is about 10 grand more. The suggestion about the K & N air filter is a good one you'll get more hp. The tuning chips for this truck do very little good, but are great for the Duramax.

Have fun with trailer. Best Ernie
__________________
Ernie2007 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2004, 09:03 PM   #24
Rivet Master
 
davidz71's Avatar
 
1986 25' Sovereign
Southern Middle , Tennessee
Join Date: Mar 2002
Posts: 3,148
Images: 23
Here is an easy way to determine axle ratio. Take some chalk or a piece of masking tape and mark a spot on the tire (let's say near the outside edge at say 9 o'clock). Now, mark a spot on the driveshaft you can see when you position yourself in front by the tire. Put the axle on jackstands (may work with this one tire off the ground) so that both tires are off the ground. Slowly turn the tire forward as if it was in gear and see how many times the driveshaft mark goes around for a complete revolution of the tire. If the shaft goes around not quite 3 1/2 times then you have a 3.42 ratio, almost 3 3/4 times then you have a 3.73 and if it goes around a little more than 4 times then you probably have a 4.10 ratio.
__________________
Craig

AIR #0078
'01 2500hd ext. cab, 8.1 litre gas, 5 sp. Allison auto
3.73 rear end
Mag-Hytec rear diff cover
Amsoil Dual by-pass oil filtration system
Amsoil synthetics all around
265 watt AM Solar, Inc. system
davidz71 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2004, 12:55 PM   #25
Rivet Master
 
59toaster's Avatar
 
1959 22' Caravanner
Atlanta , Georgia
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 2,197
Images: 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by laurandwayne
59Toaster
I'm trying to get in touch w/ p/o but until now no word about the speciific rearend. Hope this isn't a bad sign. Anyway, is there another route to determining the type axle and gears on the burb?
Wayne
If they put anything other then the 10 bolt in there it was an upgrade.
Count the bolts holding the cover on. 10 it's a 10 bolt. 12 it's a 12bolt, 14 it's a 14 bolt.
Now how many lug bolts? if it has 6 lugs but 14 on the cover that's the 3/4 ton Semi floating 14 bolt. It's a good axle and much better for towing then a 10 bolt buecause it has a larger ring and pinion.

http://www.coloradok5.com/axleguide.shtml
That has some ID info on the axles.
On the gear ratio.

Well I always pup covers on new to me vehicles to inpect stuff. I'd count teeth or on the edge of the ring gear will be some numbers. The center set of numbers will be something like 9:37 That's the number of teeth on the gears. Divide the larger number by the smaller and that's the gear. So 37 / 9 =4.11. The higher the number, the lower the gear, the easier it is for the engine to move the weight. So in third gear or D on your truck the engine would have to spin 4.11 times for every single revolution of the tire.

If your leary about pulling the cover the easiest thing to do is put a chalk mark on the tire at 6 o-clock. Put a chalk mark on the drive shaft at 3 o-clock and make a reference mark on the axle housing. Have somebody slowly drive the truck forward till the tire makes one full revolution. Count how many times the drive shaft spins. On a 31 inch tire your going to need a place where you have 63.14 inches to move the truck.
GM axle ratios are:
2.73 Gas crunch gear in the 80's
3.08 common on 10 and 12 Default V8 gear most of 70's and a lot in 80's
3.42 common on 10 Suburbans and K5 with base tow package and or 4x4
3.73 common on 10 with HD tow package, 12 with HD tow package, 14 SF and 14 FF 3/4 ton aps.
4.10 common on 12 older 6 cly trucks and some HD tow package manual transmission trucks, 14 sf and FF on 3/4 and 1 ton
4.56 Common on 14FF 1 ton
__________________
1959 22' Caravanner
1988 R20 454 Suburban.
Atlanta, GA
59toaster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2004, 07:47 PM   #26
3 Rivet Member
 
wayne.yl's Avatar
 
1977 31' Sovereign
1992 34' Excella
Currently Looking...
Salem , Oregon
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 168
Images: 5
John-boy
Thanks to forum member, Rick Alston and the speedy oiler guy, I found out what the red oily stuff is in the Air filter pan. Its the oil the K&N air filters are treated with after they are cleaned. Learn something new all the time. I now remember the P/O saying something about using that type air filter. Now I have turned my attention to solving the mystery about the truck's rearend. Thanks everyone for the helpful advice about this mystery. Hopefully I will know soon. This forum is so awesome!!
Wayne
__________________
wayne.yl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2004, 08:59 PM   #27
1 Rivet Short
 
krowsea's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by laurandwayne
John-boy
Thanks to forum member, Rick Alston and the speedy oiler guy, I found out what the red oily stuff is in the Air filter pan. Its the oil the K&N air filters are treated with after they are cleaned.
Well, that turned out better than I feared. The K&N is a great filter. There's a cleaning/re-oiling kit available (part# 99-5000) when you get around to servicing it. If there was filter oil in the air filter housing, the PO put too much oil on. Once it's cleaned, you only want to put enough oil back on to return the filter to it's original pink color. The oil comes in an easy to use aerosal can.

John-Boy
__________________
Sarchasm (n): The gulf between the author of sarcastic wit and the person who doesn't get it.


1975 31' Sovereign
2004 Dodge Ram 2500 'Laramie', HEMI
krowsea is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2004, 09:05 PM   #28
1 Rivet Short
 
krowsea's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by 59toaster
If your leary about pulling the cover the easiest thing to do is put a chalk mark on the tire at 6 o-clock. Put a chalk mark on the drive shaft at 3 o-clock and make a reference mark on the axle housing. Have somebody slowly drive the truck forward till the tire makes one full revolution. Count how many times the drive shaft spins. On a 31 inch tire your going to need a place where you have 63.14 inches to move the truck.
Great suggestion Toaster-Guy. A 'slightly' easier method, using the same technique you suggest, is to jack the rear of the truck up and support it off the ground on jack stands. Make the same mark on the inside bottom sidewall of the tire and another mark on the bottom of the driveshaft near the differential. Now, with the trans in neutral, spin the tire one revolution and as you mentioned, count the driveshaft revolutions. Just another idea.

John-Boy
__________________

__________________
Sarchasm (n): The gulf between the author of sarcastic wit and the person who doesn't get it.


1975 31' Sovereign
2004 Dodge Ram 2500 'Laramie', HEMI
krowsea is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Tow Vehicle Question-for a 34 ft, 3 axle Excella dmreilly10000 Tow Vehicles 26 08-02-2011 10:05 PM
Tow Vehicle Question SCBrat Tow Vehicles 3 09-25-2003 09:43 AM
Novice tow vehicle question Burbank3 Tow Vehicles 5 09-11-2003 01:21 PM
Tow Vehicle Question gorlesky On The Road... 2 08-31-2003 06:28 PM
Another Tow Vehicle Question jalewis Tow Vehicles 8 07-28-2003 01:51 AM


Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:30 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.