Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 03-26-2014, 01:06 AM   #1
New Member
 
1973 27' Overlander
Evergreen , Colorado
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 2
Oil-Fielding

After having bad experiences sleeping in man camp renta-rooms while interning I am looking at purchasing a new (at time of purchase) Flying Cloud 30 Recliner.

I will be using it for living on oil fields in Texas, ND, Mexico, ECT for 14 weeks (hopefully) at a time...

But... I am inexperienced in cold weather AS'ing (we've always winterized our baby when the temps hit the mid 30's) and I'm worried about issues with cold on the more northerly oil fields.

Would I need to carry a set of skirts and if I did, would they be sufficient in keeping my tanks and pipes from freezing?
Is modern AS insulation and the factory 30k BTU heater be enough to keep me warm and comfortable without chewing through my tank at atrocious rates?
Could solar power be enough to top of my batteries and power a supplemental electric heater during the day?
Am I insane for thinking this idea is even doable?


Thanks for the reply's guys!
__________________

__________________
Nikkormat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2014, 02:13 AM   #2
3 Rivet Member
 
Roblin , MB.
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 113
Greetings,
We live across the border from ND in Manitoba, Canada. We have experienced a very cold winter with lots of days of - 30 and - 40 degree temps. If you factor in the wind chill factor you could be dealing with - 50 degrees. In places here the frost is now down 6 feet and raising havoc with residential water supply lines.
Campgrounds here shut their water supply off in the fall and dumping of holding tanks would pose a problem as well. Even with good skirting, etc, you would have to add on an adequate heat source. Airstreams are not insulated to withstand these temperatures and are known to sweat on the inside and icing up is a problem. If you could arrange to work ND in the summer and Texas and Mexico in the winter that would be very doable. Trailers don't usually get taken out till the May long weekend up here.
Good luck in the oil patches and also with your Airstream.
__________________

__________________
nairnchyz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2014, 02:46 AM   #3
New Member
 
1973 27' Overlander
Evergreen , Colorado
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 2
Not being able to control my travels, -50 temps is worrying. It looks like I will have to look else where for housing.

Anyone have experience with Timberline Range Campers? They seem pretty rugged and are decently luxurious on the inside (but there no where near AS quality). Plus they have a wood burning stove and are more designed for cold weather operations. Only problem would be getting fire wood in ND were there isn't a tree in sight. --> Highlander 25′ | Timberline Range Camps™ - Sheep Camps - Sheep Wagons
__________________
Nikkormat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2014, 05:38 AM   #4
1 Rivet Member
 
Belchertown , Massachusetts
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 5
Yeah those sound like really tough conditions for anything but a heavily customized trailer for the cold, and even then I'm sure you'd go through a fair amount of fuel just to keep things from freezing up.

Electric heat is really not practical from solar for anything but an electric blanket to keep you directly warmer. Solar's great for keeping your batteries topped off, running efficient lighting and electronics, and very short term high loads like microwaves, blenders, etc.
__________________
workerdrone is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2014, 06:03 AM   #5
Rivet Master
 
87MH's Avatar
 
1978 31' Sovereign
Texas Airstream Harbor , Zavalla, in the Deep East Texas Piney Woods on Lake Sam Rayburn
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 2,435
Images: 292
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nikkormat View Post
After having bad experiences sleeping in man camp renta-rooms while interning I am looking at purchasing a new (at time of purchase) Flying Cloud 30 Recliner.
I will be using it for living on oil fields in Texas, ND, Mexico, ECT for 14 weeks (hopefully) at a time...
But...

I've worked the oil patch my entire career...my first posting was in a company camp about 100 miles SE of New Orleans, my second post was at the mouth of the Mississippi river.

Since retiring from a large oil company three years ago I have been consulting primarily in the Eagle Ford and the Marcellus - mostly living in the '78 31' Sovereign .
Anticipating spending a lot of time in the trailer, I installed two AC's - if you are serious about working in Oklahoma or Texas I highly suggest doing the same.

There is not much of an opportunity to really enjoy the trailer while working. Usually you work a 12 hour shift, then do reports. Usually I just have time to grab a bite to eat and hit the sack.

The trailer has really worked out for me for consulting after retirement, but it would suck if you tried to live in it while raising a family.

There are all sorts of man camps here in the Eagle Ford, some pretty nice, some not so much. Not much lodging at all in the Marcellus except for a bring it yourself trailer. Never worked the Balken, but two years ago I was in the Oklahoma panhandle working with production from fractured dolomite and found enough infrastructure that I did not have to bring the trailer up there.

I have found that pop up trailer parks are relatively plentiful with both 30 amp and 50 amp available in most areas.

14 weeks at a time is a really long hitch, I can only do about half of that, and am really comfortable being away from home three weeks at a time. As I stated above, I would not try to maintain much of a personal relationship while working and living in a trailer.

In summary to answer your question - an AS would work in relatively mild areas (2 AC's in the heat), but I would not attempt to use it in really cold (<20's) weather. Forget solar - the furnace draws lots of amps.
__________________
Dennis

"Suck it up, spend the bucks, do it right the first time."

WBCCI # 1113
AirForums #1737

Trailer '78 31' Sovereign

Living Large at an Airstream Park on the Largest Lake Totally Contained in Texas
Texas Airstream Harbor, Inc.
87MH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2014, 07:27 AM   #6
Rivet Master
 
Foiled Again's Avatar
 
2012 25' FB Eddie Bauer
Vintage Kin Owner
Virginia Beach , Virginia
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 5,883
There was an earlier thread which I wasn't able to find right offhand about taking an Airstream out to a worksite in remote oil fields.

The consensus was that the rough living conditions and dust, dirt and oil tracked in can ruin an Airstream or any other trailer in a hurry. One experienced person recommended an Arctic Fox or other well insulated SOB for this kind of work.

Seems sound to me.

Paula
__________________
Today is a gift, that's why they call it the present.
Foiled Again is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2014, 07:31 AM   #7
Rivet Master
 
m.hony's Avatar
 
2013 30' Classic
Greenwood , Mississippi
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 11,828
I have often been tempted to work in the oil fields and live in my Airstream, but only in the south. I would never want to live in it full time in sub-freezing temperatures.
__________________
2013 Classic 30 Limited
2007 Silver Toyota Tundra Crew Max Limited 5.7 iForce
2006 Vivid Black Harley-Davidson Road King Classic
1999 Black Nissan Pathfinder LE
TAC #MS-10
WBCCI #1811, Region 6, Unit 56
Airforums #70955
m.hony is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2014, 07:31 AM   #8
Wise Elder
 
Jammer's Avatar
 
2010 30' Classic
Vintage Kin Owner
South of the river , Minnesota
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 4,119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nikkormat View Post
After having bad experiences sleeping in man camp renta-rooms while interning I am looking at purchasing a new (at time of purchase) Flying Cloud 30 Recliner.

I will be using it for living on oil fields in Texas, ND, Mexico, ECT for 14 weeks (hopefully) at a time..
Hiya... I had a Nikkormat FT-1 once, and visited Evergreen for work some years ago...

Quote:
But... I am inexperienced in cold weather AS'ing (we've always winterized our baby when the temps hit the mid 30's) and I'm worried about issues with cold on the more northerly oil fields.

Would I need to carry a set of skirts and if I did, would they be sufficient in keeping my tanks and pipes from freezing?
I have no experience there. Usually skirts are improvised from available materials.

I would be surprised if skirting by itself would allow you to keep pipes thawed in North Dakota in January. In combination with pipe heaters and pipe wrap, perhaps.

Quote:
Is modern AS insulation and the factory 30k BTU heater be enough to keep me warm and comfortable without chewing through my tank at atrocious rates?
The factory heater will keep you at 70 degrees when it's down to around -20 outside with no wind. At those temperatures problems with heat distributions start to show up. I modified my trailer by adding some ductwork to address that, but I have a Classic, so your situation may be different.

In extreme weather you'll burn 4-8 gallons of propane a day and will need, as a practical matter, to have a local propane supplier deliver a larger tank for your stay. For 1-2 week trips people use 1 or 2 100 pound propane tanks, for 14 weeks the costs would favor something larger.

Condensation is the largest problem for long term use at below-freezing temperatures.

Quote:
Could solar power be enough to top of my batteries and power a supplemental electric heater during the day?
Am I insane for thinking this idea is even doable?
In winter months in upper latitudes there isn't enough room for sufficient solar panels to power the trailer. You have to have shore power.
__________________
To learn to see below the surface, you must adjust your altitude
Jammer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2014, 08:11 AM   #9
3 Rivet Member
 
Currently Looking...
Greer , South Carolina
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 123
Somewhere I saw this article about these giant warehouses they built in the oil patch for people to put their RV's in so they could live in them in the winter. Sounded like a good idea - think they said the rent would be $1700 a month per site - not terrible considering what rental housing is going for up there.
__________________
wncrasher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2014, 09:01 AM   #10
3 Rivet Member
 
SStar's Avatar
 
2004 28' Classic
Midland , Texas
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 182
Previous thread

Look at the thread by PirateJohn on 5/28/13. It covers about all of the issues that you have questions about.
__________________
SStar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2014, 09:10 AM   #11
Rivet Master
 
pappy19's Avatar
 
2002 30' Classic S/O
Garden Valley , Idaho
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 1,418
As another oil patch worker, my wife and I do easement and permit acquisitions, I agree with what Dennis posted 100%. We had our 31' Classic in San Antonio and used it as a home base for 4 months. One AC unit is not enough. Also, we worked 3 years in northern Ohio and had problems with the water hose connection freezing. North Dakota is much worse in the winter. I do know of a few folks that have bought real spendy motor homes and have done ok. They also towed a small car for running around. I have also seen where some smart person has built enclosed RV parks where you back into an enclosed long buildings along with others. Interesting idea, but so long privacy. all in all, winter camping in the frozen north is not a fun situation. Look on Youtube and there are numerous posts by folks working the oil patch in North Dakota and winter camping.
__________________
2008 F-250 4X4 Lariat V-10
2002 Airstream Classic 30' w/SO #2074
2007 Kubota 900 RTV
1996 Ford Bronco
2007 Lincoln LT
pappy19 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2014, 10:32 AM   #12
Rivet Master
 
Skater's Avatar
 
1995 30' Excella
Bowie , Maryland
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 2,344
Quote:
Originally Posted by SStar View Post
Look at the thread by PirateJohn on 5/28/13. It covers about all of the issues that you have questions about.
We can link to it.

I'd also suggest reading this if you haven't already: Winter living FAQ.
__________________
1995 Airstream Classic 30' Excella 1000
2014 Ram 2500 Crew Cab with Cummins 6.7L Diesel

Sold but not forgotten: 1991 Airstream B190
Sold: 2006 F-250 6.0L Powerstroke Supercab
Skater is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2014, 08:27 PM   #13
Birdie Momma
 
NJtoNC's Avatar
 
1957 26' Overlander
1956 22' Flying Cloud
Vintage Kin Owner
Rutherford Co. , North Carolina
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 904
i have 'heard' that you'll burn through a 20gal tank every other day in propane keeping her warm in ND. no actual experience though.
__________________

__________________
'57 Overlander | '56 Flying Cloud | '51 Spartanette
NJtoNC is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
To oil or not to Oil woodyarn General Repair Forum 14 08-03-2012 09:05 AM
Does the amount of engine oil increase with the addition of a larger oil cooler? Mr. D Mechanics Corner - Engines, Transmission & More... 5 03-07-2009 09:56 AM
Engine Oil Question ViewRVs Mechanics Corner - Engines, Transmission & More... 12 05-25-2008 09:45 AM
Good deal on Mobil 1 Oil... Silvertwinkie Our Community 28 05-16-2003 05:18 PM
oil and trans fluids ALANSD Airstream Motorhome Forums 22 08-01-2002 03:47 AM


Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:02 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.