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Old 06-18-2010, 09:47 AM   #101
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1964 24' Tradewind
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the yellow thing is a Aluminum Air Tank that may have been converted at some time. I have one like this and one that is 1/4 that size. I have been told that they were used on everything from B-52 's to old cargo trucks. I am not sure what they actually came from, but I have seen them used as portable air tanks, Gas tanks, Air brake and air bag tanks. And now a hot water heater tank. Which seems pretty strange since the aluminum would tend to wick the heat out of the water and into the trailer. But who knows.

Nice trailer.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 66Overlander View Post
And finally, here are a couple middle interior photo's, including one of a the stangest Water Heater I have ever seen under the front dinette seat. It appears to be a 110VAC electric only model and is shaped like a scuba tank. It and the electric air pump to pressurize the water system were also added in the 1970's, I assume.

Also attached are some photo's of the extra parts I picked up along the return trip in New York and Pennsylvania to aid me in the restoration. Among the bigger pickups was the stove, drawers, and countertop from a 1956 Safari, and the toilet from a 1962 Overlander. I also got a lot of micellaneous smaller parts, knobs and light fixtures, etc.
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Old 06-20-2010, 04:43 AM   #102
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1962 26' Overlander
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Elevator bolts... the topic of many HOT debates over the years....

When restoring something it has always been the rule to put it back as it was. I always thought elevator bolts were the way to go. I am currently working on a 1973 Safari. The entire thing was screwed down using #14 self drillers. The perimeter was bolted to the out riggers using elevator bolts. Which would you think worked best? The self drillers hands down. Not one single screw has popped. Not one single screw pulled though. Not one single screw rusted away or even rusted for that matter. On the other hand more than half the elevator bolts were seriously compromised. Many broke off years ago. Many were pulled though. They were all rusted very badly. I have serious questions as to their claim to be the right thing to use.

Joe, the only criticism of the screws I have is you might have used too many.
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Old 06-20-2010, 05:53 AM   #103
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I think we've decided that another AS is in order; we're trying to choose between an Overlander or a Safari (kinda leaning towards the Safari)

Any thoughts?
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Old 06-20-2010, 06:34 PM   #104
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 62overlander View Post
Elevator bolts... the topic of many HOT debates over the years....

When restoring something it has always been the rule to put it back as it was. I always thought elevator bolts were the way to go. I am currently working on a 1973 Safari. The entire thing was screwed down using #14 self drillers. The perimeter was bolted to the out riggers using elevator bolts. Which would you think worked best? The self drillers hands down. Not one single screw has popped. Not one single screw pulled though. Not one single screw rusted away or even rusted for that matter. On the other hand more than half the elevator bolts were seriously compromised. Many broke off years ago. Many were pulled though. They were all rusted very badly. I have serious questions as to their claim to be the right thing to use.

Joe, the only criticism of the screws I have is you might have used too many.
I am not trying to defend the elevator bolt, or say you are wrong Frank, I would never, but, the channel between the skins is where most water that tends to seep in collects or water off the runs under. To compare the outer channel to the inner floor is not apples to apples.

Also as the trailer as a whole moves and rotates I would think that the stresses are greatest on the outside which is being held down by our friends the elevator bolts.

I would, what ever you use, use more on the channels where they meet the outriggers and in between and space them close, the closer you get along the outriggers to the wall. That is where they are going to fail first.
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Old 06-29-2010, 06:09 PM   #105
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FC7039 View Post
I am not trying to defend the elevator bolt, or say you are wrong Frank, I would never, but, the channel between the skins is where most water that tends to seep in collects or water off the runs under. To compare the outer channel to the inner floor is not apples to apples.

Also as the trailer as a whole moves and rotates I would think that the stresses are greatest on the outside which is being held down by our friends the elevator bolts.

I would, what ever you use, use more on the channels where they meet the outriggers and in between and space them close, the closer you get along the outriggers to the wall. That is where they are going to fail first.
I am merely making an observation on what I found.... When attacking any restoration job, my approach is to put it back exactly as it was originally.
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Old 08-21-2010, 11:00 PM   #106
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Just purchased a 55 safari,thanks for taking the time to well document your restoration.
One interesting note, mine also came with the strange yellow water heater, is it possible that was original? If not a pretty big coincidence.

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Old 10-23-2010, 09:31 PM   #107
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Long Time No Update
Things are finally moving with the Safari again. I have finally been convinced to replace the damaged exterior panels. (Yeah says the masses).

I am getting ready to pull the trailer to Shacksman's place next weekend to replace the lower panels on the entire front, entire streetside, and curbside rear corner. We will also redo the belly pan. We'll pull the front inner endcap so that we can massage the upper dents, but those panels will not be replaced. It will be a lot of work, but it's good to get going again.

To get ready for the trip, I had to get the safety chains and tail lights hooked up. That was today's tasks.

Anyway, this progress reminded me that my photo story is a little behind. I will get everything caught up in the next few posts.
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Old 10-23-2010, 09:37 PM   #108
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3/21/2010 Progress:
This was the second day working the last weekend before the trailer had to be out of the shop. My freind Dave came back to help me secure the front and rear of the shell to the frame and put in the last of the floor screws. We then tacked up the belly wraps and realized that they were going to need to be replaced. We' couldn't install the tires, because one of the saw horses was in the way. Bob noted that he'd get the saw horse moved, wheels installed, and trailer on the ground by the next weekend.

The photos are:
1. Dave bolting down the front of the shell.
2. Floor and shell attachment complete (yeah)
3. Dave and I securing belly wraps
4. Bob pondering moving the saw horse so we could install the wheels
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Old 10-23-2010, 09:41 PM   #109
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3/27/2010 Progress:
This was the day the trailer finally came out of the shop and went to it's new home in the storage yard. I considered trying to hook up the trailer tail lights, but decided to just rig up some temporary lights instead due to limited time and tools.

Photos are:
1. The shop is empty after the Safari was pulled out
2. Safari out of shop with temporary lights
3. Owner (me) and the Safari in the daylight
4. Safari in the storage yard
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Old 10-23-2010, 09:53 PM   #110
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Today's Progress (10/23/2010):
I pulled the Safari down to a local place and got hoops welded on so that I could attach some new safety chains. I then pulled the trailer home to undo the temporary lights and hook up the actual trailer lights. I then one by one removed the screws I had used to attach the shell to the floor in the corners and replaced them with shorter screws. I needed to do this, because the screws I originally bought we too long and the poked through the corner belly wraps which fit pretty tightly to the floor. This was not a big deal because the wraps had to be replaced anyway, but shorter screws were needed to keep them from poking through the new corner belly wraps. I did not need to replace the screws along the side, however, because there is enough depth in that area.

All of this in preparation for a 2 or 3 hour long tow next weekend to replace some exterior skin panels. I may do a few more things tomorrow. It feels good to have this project moving again!

The photos are:
1. Chain hoops and chains installed
2. Umbilical cord temporarily secured to the tongue (will redo more permanently later)
3. Umbilical cord wire nutted to trailer wiring (will redo more permanently later)
4. Trailer lights working (temporary lights then came off)
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Old 10-24-2010, 09:55 PM   #111
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More Progress Today
It may not seem like much, but the couple of hours I planned today to remove the front and rear beltline modings dragged out to over four hours and Lorrie and I only got the front and rear street side moldings off.

Getting that much done took lots of Kroil penetrating oil, as well as lots of persuasion from vice grips, screwdrivers, and a hammer. A few screws were able to be turned from the outside, but most required turning by gripping the threads with vice grips from the inside. A few broke the head off the first time they were touched by a screw driver. A few broke the shank off the screw when grabbed by the vice grips. The two moldings removed were held on by original stainless screws.

The one molding I didn't get off was on the corner that previously had a panel replaced. The screw heads are rusty suggesting they are not stainless. Most of these broke immediately when I tried to grab them with vise grips from the inside. Arrgghhh.

Everything takes longer than expected when working on an Airstream. Well, almost everything. We also took the outside faucet off the front street side corner (no photo). That only took a few minutes and was one of the few things so far that has been as easy as it was expected to be.
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Old 10-28-2010, 06:26 PM   #112
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1963 22' Safari
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Nice progress Joe, glad your back on it!
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Old 11-06-2010, 11:40 PM   #113
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10/30/2010 Progress:
Last Saturday, I pulled the Safari to Shacksman's place to begin the skin and belly pan replacement.

Once the trailer was in the garage, we began by removing the rear curb side beltline molding. All it took was more Kroil and a bigger hammer banging harder on screwdriver to loosen the screws. Then we drilled out the rivets and removed the rear curbside corner panel and belly wrap corner. Interestingly, that damaged corner skin panel that we removed (and which had been replaced once before) was .050 thick, not the typical .032.

We then traced the old skin panel onto a new .032 2024-T3 panel and cut it out, but didn't drill the rivet holes, because they could be drilled on the trailer using the existing panels that overlay this panel as templates. We also used the old belly corner as a pattern to cut a new one out of the .032 6061-T6 I purchased a few months ago.

We installed the belly plan corner, only needing to make minor adjustments and then used a few pop rivets to hold it in place. We then taped the side of the new corner panel so that it wouldn't get scratched up during installation and slid it into place so that we could drill the rivets holes, clecoeing it into place as we went. We then removed the panel to clean up the aluminum shavings and coat the seams liberally with Vulkem. Finally, we reinstalled the panel, clecoed it into place than then carefully buck riveted it. Around the rear window and the rear storage compartment we had a tough time getting the bucking bar to the back or the rivets, so a few olympic rivets were used in those locations.

The attached photos are:
1. The Safari in the garage
2. Doug drilling out rivets
3. Rear curb side corner panel and belly off
4. Tracing the old skin onto the new skin before cutting it out
5. Drilling and clecoeing the new skin on the trailer
6. Vulkem applied before final permanent install of the corner panel
7. Rear curb side corner panel bucked into place
8. Comparison of new and old bucked rivets (the gold color will easily polish off the new buck rivets)

I will provide further updates on the progress we made last Sunday and Monday in subsequent posts.
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Old 11-07-2010, 02:34 AM   #114
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Great job Joe! Makes me think I can do good work too.
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Old 11-07-2010, 08:23 AM   #115
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Great work! It's coming together nicely. Feels so good to have that nice new metal in place doesn't it!
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Old 11-07-2010, 12:00 PM   #116
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Wow! Great job Joe! Also looks like you got a new tow vehicle?
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Old 11-07-2010, 11:34 PM   #117
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Thanks for the comments everyone! More progress coming next post.

Everything with panel replacement seems intimidating . . . that is until you've done it. Then it is not so bad, just time consuming to do it right.

As for the tow vehicle, no we haven't changed. I just got a chance to try out a vehicle from work for a few days. We still LOVE the Hummer H2 as our primary tow vehicle and at less than 50,000 miles, it's got a lot of life left in it.
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Old 11-07-2010, 11:57 PM   #118
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10/31/2010 Progress:
Sunday was another big work day last weekend. We started by removing the lower street side panel below the bank of windows. That alone took three hours for the two of us to drill out the rivets. When we removed this panel, a bunch of shims fell on the floor. It appears that the factory built up the width of one of the ribs to get a smooth side panel using several (8 - 10) pieces of overlapping aluminum. These shims were only held in place by the skin rivets. We decided we'll have to put them back when that panel goes back on to get a smooth fit. I think we'll need to tape them in place before we buck the rivets.

Next we removed the side belly wraps and the rear street side corner belly wrap. We made and installed (no photo) a new corner belly wrap. During this time I also scraped and painted the rusty edge of the wheel well liner.

At this point, we wondered what to do next and decided that we should remove and replace front skin before we install the side skin, since otherwise it would have to be tucked under the new side skin. Given that it was getting late and we didn't want to drill out hundreds of more rivets, we decided to remove the front inner end cap with our remaining time, so that we could eventually work the dents out of the outer end cap skin from the inside.

To do this, we needed to remove the front curb side corner kitchen roof locker and then drill out a few pop rivets, including several hidden ones under other panels. Since I was not planning to remove the main inner roof skins, nor the street side rook lockers, some of the hidden rivets weren't actually drilled out. Instead we just sheared the head off with a hammer and chisel.

Once the front inner end cap was removed, we removed the remaining insulation (which included many mouse nests and chewed wiring) and called it a night.

The photos are:
1. Starting the day
2. Removing the street side panel
3. Shims!
4. Side panel off
5. Side belly wraps off
6. Rear street side corner belly wrap off
7. New corner belly wrap and painted wheel well liner
8. Kitchen roof locker removed
9. Front inner end cap removed
10. Front insulation removed
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Old 11-08-2010, 07:29 AM   #119
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Joe, impressive work! I note in post 109 that you have your coach raised considerably off the floor (so you can work underneath without having to lie on your back). Would you please describe (1) what you are using to support the weight of the coach and (2) how you raised the coach to the height of your supports? I need to start work under my coach this coming summer, and I would like to do something like you have done. Many thanks, Hank.
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Old 11-08-2010, 10:30 PM   #120
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Originally Posted by hjlairf View Post
Joe, impressive work! I note in post 109 that you have your coach raised considerably off the floor (so you can work underneath without having to lie on your back). Would you please describe (1) what you are using to support the weight of the coach and (2) how you raised the coach to the height of your supports? I need to start work under my coach this coming summer, and I would like to do something like you have done. Many thanks, Hank.
Thanks for the kind words!

The steel saw horses in post #109 belonged to the welder that repaired the frame. He used a fork lift to somehow get the trailer up on them and down off them. I wasn't there either time, so I don't know how he did it. And that is probably just as well, because I'd have been a wreck watching.

That extra height would help with the belly pan replacement, but we are getting it done now with the tires on the ground and the frame supported in the middle and on the ends with blocks of wood and jack stands. The extra height was more important for the welding repairs, I think.

I have one more day's worth of photos to post, but no time to do so this evening. Stay tuned the next day or so for more of the photo history.
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