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Old 10-14-2009, 05:22 PM   #15
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Pulled mine apart. Explains the wet spot.

I have a very small wet spot under the curb side twin bed in the back of my Excella. It appears it had just popped up because I could feel no other soft spots. I have been thinking it was from the windows, rear awning or lights. After reading this thread, I pulled the trim and bingo, I think I see where the water was coming from. For the most part, it was sealed very well with what looked like Vulkem. On the end, it looked like it lost it's seal. It is within a foot of the spot.
In the pic with the screw driver, I'm pointing to the plastic or fiberglass bottom cover. Is that what is called the banana wrap? The trim covers this up. Should I try to seal this also? It is attached below the flooring so I do not think it would wet the bottom of the OSB. Looks like someone had put some silicon on that area so I'll be peeling it off. I have Vulkem to seal everything.
Glad I caught this before major problems.
Joe
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Old 10-14-2009, 08:22 PM   #16
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Joe, the banana wrap goes from the trim band and curves down under to the belly pan. You photo makes it look like a black foam rubber strip.

In any event, just seal the top edge of the trim. If the shell skin goes down below the bottom edge of the floor, then any water that gets in will go into the banana wrap and thence into the belly pan. The belly pan is not sealed, so the water leaks out.

One of the big dangers in sealing too much is that you wind up trapping water and causing long-term corrosion. So always make sure there is a path for water to escape, if it gets in.

Zep

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Originally Posted by AirHeadsRus View Post
...In the pic with the screw driver, I'm pointing to the plastic or fiberglass bottom cover. Is that what is called the banana wrap? The trim covers this up. Should I try to seal this also? ...
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Old 10-23-2009, 07:39 PM   #17
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Poor Design

Zep,

My wife & I started to revive a 65 22' Safari this summer. We found the only floor problem is the same that you shared earlier in this thread. The bumper wicked so much water over the years that the rear of the floor is totally rotten. The original owner repaired the floor enough to get by. They must have thought the water came from the rivets and seams as they used silicone caulk on all in the back (took forever to remove it all and polish). My question is: Did the piece of angle alum. stop the wicking? Any more info you can share will be greatly appreciated.

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Old 10-23-2009, 08:13 PM   #18
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Hard to know if it worked fully. All I know is that the floor hasn't gotten noticeably soft. I don't feel any moisture in the wood when I look in that area--it's fully exposed just inside the back access door.

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Old 03-20-2010, 11:21 AM   #19
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My bumper storage area on 1973 Overlander is filled with stinky water. Is there supposed to be a drain hole? It looks rusty in there. Will wet/dry vaccuum it out. Any suggestions?
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Old 03-20-2010, 11:51 AM   #20
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Don't vacuum! drill some drain holes. It sounds like some PO "thought" it ought to be watertight. Nope, bad idea. You can't keep water coming down the back of the trailer from going in there unless you do some awesome work on the lid--got an O-ring that's 4' in diameter?

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Old 03-29-2010, 07:51 PM   #21
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I also had there rear rot issue. The rear 6" of the wood was completely rotted. I dropped the black water tank, repaired the rusty crossmember holding the tank in, had a new blackwater pan made of galvanized steel, cut off the wood with a skil saw, dug out all the rotted wood, slipped in new marine grade plywood and drilled out all the screws and replaced them with 3/8 in. stainless bolts. I made steel plates with 3/8 in bolts to go over the plywood gaps and insure a stable floor. I then used a PPL product (polyeurethane from Home Depot) and sealed the entire rear seam and the entire piece of trim. That was in 2003 and it has not been wet since. My trailer sits outside (unfortunately) all year. It's much easier to get in there and fix this stuff with the black water tank removed. You can also have a local heating and cooling guy whip you up watever sheetmetal you need. they even made me a new sheetmetal piece for my rear bumper compartment that looks better than factory. I also painted the frame in there with POR15. It's good for another 40 years.
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Old 03-29-2010, 09:07 PM   #22
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Poor Bumber Design

drm101 - thanks for your experience and fix. Sounds like your good for another 40 years. I pulled our 65 Safari out of the poll barn last week and went at the bumper problem. I used builders Solar Seal to caulk the seams deep inside the seam of the bumper all the way into the floor. Then used vulkem on top of the the trim channel and all the riverts. I gave it a major hose test under high pressure and so far no water inside. This really was a poor design that could have been easily fixed with a piece of 90% angle. If the caulk holds for a few years great. If not I will have to consider a complete rebuild of the rear end as you have done....nice to hear from another Michigander.......Tim
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Old 03-31-2010, 08:07 PM   #23
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Just another tidbit. There is a bulletin from Airstream regarding Frame Seperation that details replacing the rear channel bolts. It gives some good pics of how it goes together and how to repair it. One thing that I had to do was to cut a two by three squarein the skin above the frame to get at the bolts there. I used standard aluminum flashing and sealed rivits to cover the holes. olympic rivits would have been better, but I was a novice then and didn't have them or know where to get them. If the wood is rotted, chances are good the bolts are rusted too and it's a good idea to fix it all at once and be done with it.
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Old 04-07-2010, 08:49 PM   #24
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I am going to try to seal my bumper area soon.

I have no water showing at all now or rot at all (thank goodness for marine ply wood) but did have some slight water on the edge until I put plastic over the bumper for the winter.

What a pain that was having to keep it on all winter............

Does anyone know if the large channel trim is plastic and flexible ?

I know the plastic strip inside the trim is plastic because I took it off last year to caulk around screws but the main channel that holds this has me puzzled.........it looks like aluminum and I am wondering how to remove it without kinking it ?

Or can I just raise it up off the seam to seal ?

Also, my screws heads are rusty, any idea of an easy way to get them out ?

Robbie R.
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Old 04-09-2010, 07:10 PM   #25
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the trim is aluminum. if you still have the plastic blue strip inside it, you have to remove the plastic in order to see the pop rivets that hold the aluminum trim in place. you will need to take the rivets out for quite a ways around the side and forward, maybe 4 feet or so, in order to lift the trim up out of the way when you caulk.

getting the rusty screws out requires a good phillips screw driver, like Sears. don't use the import models, even if they have a strong tip--they have too shallow an angle and will bugger the screw head. then it takes a dose of luck. if you don't have luck, make sure you have a good 1/8 bit to drill them out with...

Zep
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Old 04-10-2010, 10:57 AM   #26
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Thanks a lot for the reply. That helps me a lot and makes me feel like I have a good chance of curing this problem.

I plan to tackle this soon.

Robbie R.
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Old 05-14-2010, 05:31 AM   #27
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There is more than one design flaw in the rear of these early 70 units. In the rear is a steel plate that attaches the shell to the frame very solidly.
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You can see it in the bottom left corner of this photo...
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once you remove the belt line you will begin to see how this flaw is eating up the skin.
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and sending chunks of both aluminum and iron oxide out of the seam between the shell and the frame.
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And then when you lift the steel angle off the bolts you will find an aluminum plate that makes up part of the bumper hatch...
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And this is what remains. No one must have known that aluminum, steel, water, and a slight electric current are not a very good combination.
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Old 05-14-2010, 07:23 AM   #28
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And this is what remains. No one must have known that aluminum, steel, water, and a slight electric current are not a very good combination.

Is there a way to insulate the aluminum from the steel?


This is what was left of my floor.

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I'm pretty sure it was because of the bumper problem. The aluminum and the steel angle in the back were also FUBAR, and have been remade. A small strip of skin between the bumper and rear access door also had to be replaced. I'm getting ready to reconnect the shell, and would like to keep this from happening again. How about drilling or punching some holes in the tain't (it ain't shell, and it ain't bumper)?
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