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Old 11-24-2014, 10:18 AM   #351
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Just wondering what the load figures are on a 4x4 Double Cab. I'm thinking the payload is even less on a 4x4 DC SR5. The higher trim levels are probably even less.

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Old 11-24-2014, 04:16 PM   #352
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You are correct. If you have the owners manual on your Tundra. All models and capacities are listed.


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Old 11-24-2014, 05:36 PM   #353
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I see on the Ford description of the HD payload package they add heavy duty springs and shocks and LT tires.
What if you added upgraded shocks, air bags and LT tires on a Tundra could you safely add payload? This wouldn't be sanctioned by the manufacturer of course but no where do I see HD packages modifying the axle or wheel bearings. As long as the GAWR of each axle is not exceeded why wouldn't this work?
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Old 11-24-2014, 06:51 PM   #354
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I see on the Ford description of the HD payload package they add heavy duty springs and shocks and LT tires.
What if you added upgraded shocks, air bags and LT tires on a Tundra could you safely add payload? This wouldn't be sanctioned by the manufacturer of course but no where do I see HD packages modifying the axle or wheel bearings. As long as the GAWR of each axle is not exceeded why wouldn't this work?
On the '09-'14 Fords, the HD Payload axle is also distinct from the standard-load axles (in addition to the other stuff you listed.) It's a bigger ring gear and with 7-lug hubs, limited-slip instead of e-locker. The 7-lug hubs come with wheels specific to the package and E-rated tires.

On the '15+ it's not yet clear if it's a different axle. The ring gear is the same, and it's a 6-lug E-locker. I don't know if the different frame and lighter body on the '15 gives them enough headroom to use the same axle for the big payload, or if some components are upgraded internally but it's the same size.
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Old 12-01-2014, 02:43 PM   #355
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A WD hitch does not increase payload. It redistributes tongue weight so that roughly 1/3 goes to the truck front axle, 1/3 to the truck rear axle and 1/34 to the trailer axle(s). It reduces the weight against the payload. Find out your tongue wt., add a few hundred pounds because the ratings are probably wrong, take 2/3 of that total and subtract that from payload. Then subtract yourself and other passengers and see what is left. Figure out what you take with you in the truck and weight it. See how it comes out, then see what you don't need and start on a diet.

You can add springs or do other suspension modifications, but other things need to be considered—can the drive shaft, brakes, differentials and transmission handle the extra weight? The Tundra looks pretty beefy underneath and I would think some components can handle a lot more weight, but I don't really know. It looks like a 5/8 ton rather than a 1/2 ton. Some things may have been designed for a 3/4 ton Tundra that was never produced. However, payload, which varies considerably from model to model and with different options (running boards, tonneau, topper, etc., all are subtracted from weight if they are not standard with the particular model), is what the manufacturer says. I think Toyota has been pretty honest with their weight ratings, not so sure about other companies.

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Old 12-01-2014, 03:57 PM   #356
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I've weighed my tongue weight on a Sherline scale and I'm between 1100 and 1200lbs so if the 1/3 rule applies I'm 800lbs on the Tundra. Between my wife and me that is 350 lbs (I make the majoriy of that weight). That leaves 295lbs of payload but I have added running boards and a tonneau cover that weighs probably 50 to 70lbs so I'm closer to 150lbs payload. I then carry in the bed a few folding lawn chairs, a small BBQ, a couple of plastic containers with my leveling blocks, awning patio mat, 50qt cooler etc. My yellow load sticker shows 1445lbs. I've seen Tundra pull so much more over the last couple of years including 5th wheels. I guess they are all over GVWR. I'm hoping Toyota over engineers and post lower GVWR for liability purposes.

I looked at a new Ford F150 4x4 with Max Tow Pkg (not HD Payload Pkg) and it only had 1765lbs payload so not much more considering it will be $13k more than what I spent on my preowned 2010 Tundra. Maybe I see what the 2015 F150s but I'm sure they will be priced sky high.

I don't want a 3/4ton pickup. Forget diesel at over a $1/gal and the Ford/GM gas engines don't seem better than the 5.7L and from what I've read thirstier.

The only solution seems is dump my heavy hitch weight Classic 25FB and get a 23FB.

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Old 12-01-2014, 05:36 PM   #357
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Go put your rig across the scale three times. Once WD tensioned, second slackened, and third truck only. Full fuel and gear for camping + pax in truck. Full water and propane in trailer plus usual supplies (or approximate with sand bags). Get real numbers. Guesstimates wind up meaning spending more with no guarantee of improvement.

FAWR and RAWR are what matter. If all else is to your liking and the lashup can be made good then there is no reason on this end of things to change truck or trailer.
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Old 12-03-2014, 05:55 PM   #358
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Kelvin, we have a tonneau and running boards too and I think they weigh at least 150 lbs. together. My payload is higher, so I suspect you have the crew cab. Perhaps you can remove the rear seats for travel. Seats weigh a lot more than you may think. I looked at that for ours, but don't remember why I didn't—maybe it looked hard to do. I did do that to increase space on a long trip in a 4Runner years ago and Toyota did not make it easy. Some of the items you put in the truck bed could go in to the trailer too.

I think 'mover is right since you are close to or above payload—get it weighed.

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Old 12-05-2014, 10:16 AM   #359
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Gene, what is your payload sticker show?

I have a double cab 2wd SR5. Maybe the 4x4 have more payload. There is more room in the Tundra DC than the equivalent from Ford or GM and is one of the reasons I chose the Tundra. No doubt I'm at or slightly above payload even without weighing the truck. I haven't bothered to weigh my chairs, BBQ, folding table, plastic bins with various trailer accessories, and my ice chest with a couple of 6 packs of beer and ice that I put in the bed. I only take what I think I will need. Probably future purchases will include portable solar and/or 2000w generator plus a 2 gallon fuel container.

I estimate I've got about 6000 miles of towing since purchasing my AS including one long trip to Florida from DFW. At the time I was looking at tow vehicles I wasn't educated about payload and figured any 1/2 ton was good enough to pull an AS 25. The Tundra hasn't seemed to suffer. AT and coolant temperatures never budge despite the summer heat and the engine has enough power. The suspension doesn't seem to have bee affected. Its not riding lower or uneven. When the AS is connected I measure 37" from ground to fender lip on all 4 wheels.

I either have to replace my Tundra or get a smaller AS or an SOB. Even a new 2014 Ford F150 Supercrew, 157" WB, with HD Tow Pkg only has 1765lbs payload, only 300lbs more than my Tundra. To me its not worth spending that kinda money for 300lbs. I don't like F250s or GM 2500HD. Maybe the 2015 F150s will have more payload but I'm not sure I want to spend that type of money.

I'll try to get the Tundra weighed with us and all the goodies loaded. Its difficult for both of us to be away from the house for very long since we are caring for my elderly mother.

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Old 12-05-2014, 03:31 PM   #360
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Toyota Tundra as a Tow Vehicle

My poor old 2004 Nissan Titan has dragged my 31' Sovereign over 55000 miles over the past ten years with nary a whimper and no mechanical issues of note. It is a less capable vehicle than your Tundra (you have better brakes and a 6 speed transmission)

Why are you rushing off to make a change? You noted that you towed down to Florida and back and everything was nominal. Is the trailer and TV level? No sags? No "squishy" feeling? Starts and stops easily and controllably?

Your actual road experience is useful data. Consider it before you do anything drastic.

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Old 12-07-2014, 04:24 PM   #361
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Kelvin, the payload is 1,580 lbs. according to the book, but the sticker says 1,395. That's less than yours because 4WD weighs more. I assumed because everything is standard on the truck, payload was like it said in the book—not the owner's manual, but an advertising book Toyota uses to promote trucks and cars. Assumptions are not reliable, but I never bothered to look at the sticker. The difference of nearly 200 lbs. must be because of the tow package, but that seems excessive. I'm not sure what else could decrease payload since it was pretty much a stock SR5. I guess we are over the limit.

I put some of the heaviest stuff—tools—behind the front seats to distribute the weight between axles. I also carry the trailer spare at the front of the bed transferring some weight from the rear truck axle to the front axle of the truck. This reduces tongue weight as well.

There used to be lot of posts that you should only carry 80% of payload. I haven't seen that lately. I never saw anyone prove that made sense except that if you carry less you have less wear and tear, but no one quantified it or showed it to be significant.

We just got to 98,000 miles with the Tundra and it still performs like new. More payload would be nice, but truck prices have skyrocketed because sales are now so strong. I'd wait 'til sales drop off before I'd consider a new truck and then I'll be looking for better gas mileage as well as reliability and performance.

I'm trying to decide whether I should change the oil less frequently. The 2013 FJ Cruiser we bought recommended 10,000 mile oil changes because it uses full synthetic oil. I've always used full synthetic in the Tundra. I'm letting it go past the recommended 5,000 miles and I think I'm at 6,400 now. It wasn't too long ago they recommended 3,500 miles then went to 5,000. I asked a dealer shop manager about it and he had never thought about it so he defaulted to 5,000—no thinking there.

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Old 12-07-2014, 05:21 PM   #362
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Kelvin, the payload is 1,580 lbs. according to the book, but the sticker says 1,395. That's less than yours because 4WD weighs more. I assumed because everything is standard on the truck, payload was like it said in the book—not the owner's manual, but an advertising book Toyota uses to promote trucks and cars. Assumptions are not reliable, but I never bothered to look at the sticker. The difference of nearly 200 lbs. must be because of the tow package, but that seems excessive. I'm not sure what else could decrease payload since it was pretty much a stock SR5. I guess we are over the limit.

I put some of the heaviest stuff—tools—behind the front seats to distribute the weight between axles. I also carry the trailer spare at the front of the bed transferring some weight from the rear truck axle to the front axle of the truck. This reduces tongue weight as well.

There used to be lot of posts that you should only carry 80% of payload. I haven't seen that lately. I never saw anyone prove that made sense except that if you carry less you have less wear and tear, but no one quantified it or showed it to be significant.

We just got to 98,000 miles with the Tundra and it still performs like new. More payload would be nice, but truck prices have skyrocketed because sales are now so strong. I'd wait 'til sales drop off before I'd consider a new truck and then I'll be looking for better gas mileage as well as reliability and performance.

I'm trying to decide whether I should change the oil less frequently. The 2013 FJ Cruiser we bought recommended 10,000 mile oil changes because it uses full synthetic oil. I've always used full synthetic in the Tundra. I'm letting it go past the recommended 5,000 miles and I think I'm at 6,400 now. It wasn't too long ago they recommended 3,500 miles then went to 5,000. I asked a dealer shop manager about it and he had never thought about it so he defaulted to 5,000—no thinking there.

Gene
Gene...you inspired me to trek across the street and check my door sticker. My 2008 Tundra 2WD SR5 Double Cab with Trailer Pkg. and TRD Off-Road package, shows cargo weight at 1475 lbs. But...there is also this sticker which tells me to subtract 380 lbs. Which brings me down to 1100 lbs? So with wife, tonneau cover, tool box and about a 12-pack (no ice) I'm over loaded. Any idea what the label could refer to?

Gene
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Old 12-07-2014, 06:41 PM   #363
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I think I read somewhere that Toyota had put those stickers on to be n compliance with federal standards a couple years ago. Could be wrong


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Old 12-07-2014, 07:17 PM   #364
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Gene...you inspired me to trek across the street and check my door sticker. My 2008 Tundra 2WD SR5 Double Cab with Trailer Pkg. and TRD Off-Road package, shows cargo weight at 1475 lbs. But...there is also this sticker which tells me to subtract 380 lbs. Which brings me down to 1100 lbs? So with wife, tonneau cover, tool box and about a 12-pack (no ice) I'm over loaded. Any idea what the label could refer to?

Gene
I think a trip to CAT scale would give you your exact payload :-)
For our SUV, the door sticker is the published payload minus the weight of a full tank of fuel (roughly, 1400# - 200# = 1200#).
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