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Old 08-21-2003, 07:54 AM   #15
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Re: Weight a minute...

Quote:
Originally posted by j54mark
Another point to consider is the weight of these types of floor. I do not know about Pergo brand, but my Alloc is about 1.5 pounds per square foot, several times the weight of carpet and pad.

Fortunately I do not have many sq. ft. in my 25' Sovereign, but if you are crowding your weight limits anyway, this type flooring is not going to help any.

Mark
Weight is one of the reasons why I chose to go with cork flooring. My trailer has a limited useful load as built and I wanted to avoid adding weight. The glue-down cork I am putting in will actually be lighter than the carpet and pad that I took out; about a third of the weight of something like Pergo.

Of course, equal reasons for choosing cork are the appearance, quietness, ease of maintenance, and good feel underfoot.

BTW: I saw a single-axle 26' yesterday with a Pergo floor. Very attractive, but I wondered about the weight gain.
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Old 08-21-2003, 08:29 AM   #16
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FWIW, the pergo I used weights about 30 lbs per box, and I used 3 boxes. I didn't weigh the carpet and pad that I took out, but it must have weighed something. So I added what? 50, 60, maybe 70lbs, spread out over the entire length of the trailer. didnt' think that was too much of a penalty. the empty weight of the trailer is (allegedly) 3500 lbs, and the gross is 5500. So..that's a pretty good "useful load".
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Old 08-21-2003, 08:33 AM   #17
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CAD

The cork that I ordered comes only in case lots of 11 1' x 2' tiles. In order to determine whether 2 cases would cover the area, I measured the trailer and made a CAD image of the floor plan.

I laid out a tile at a reasonable starting point and then used the stamp function of the program to place additional tiles as needed to cover the whole area. Where the tiles extended out of the area, I could see what portion of the tile could be used elsewhere. I required that all joints must be factory edges.

I then went back and started numbering the tiles. The odd shape of the floor requires a lot of tile cutting. Part tiles are numbered 1a, 1b, etc.

I made 3 layouts using different starting alignments. In all 3 layouts, the 2 cases of cork will cover the area. What I did find out that one of the layouts involves much less tile cutting and fitting than the other two.
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Old 01-03-2005, 10:30 PM   #18
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Question wood flooring installation?

I just picked up our oak tongue and grooved, just replaced the 3/4 inch subflooring. What is this rubber foam ? Ive been to Home Depot and Lowes, and sever RV parts centers, no one knows what it is. How do you adhere the rubber foam to the subflooring. What specific adhesive do I use to adhere the oak flooring to the foam rubber?

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Originally Posted by Creampuff
For what it's worth,here's a post I sent to another BB about 6 month's ago.* * * *
------------------------------------------------------------------------
The old floor tiles came up real easy-probably because the coach lived most of her life in AZ.If your's don't try lightly torching them with a propane torch to softhen the glue.The cabinetry rests on top of the tiles so you need to use a chisel to cut a clean line.Next,I used the old line pattern left on the plywood to get my layout.I started at the door with a ripped piece that needs to be scribed to the curve of the coach.I removed the aluminum molding along the wall .The floor 'floats"on a thin layer of foam rubber which you lay down first and tape the joints.I chose to run the material only to the bathroom door,as the curves of the bathroom are difficult and vinyl is a bettter choice.Follow the instructions on the box,although I lefft far less expansion space at the edges as the span is small.You glue each tongue with a bead of special glue as you go.the material is 1/4 '' thick so it still allows the storage cabinets to open.The only problem areas were the furnace vents and in front of the frig.where the panel won't fit really well unless your's is a tad higher than mine.The whole job took me a Saturday including brad pinning small molding.If you don't have a brad gun ,construction adhesive will work but allow the floor to move as essentilaly it ends up as a solid shhet of material that is only held down by the molding.The results were really great-we used a light oak which worked well with the original white oak cabinetry.Count on about 60 sq ft min.of material if you don't do the bathroom or in the closets.The torture test was a weekend trip where our two dogs ran in the stream and then the sand.We just kept sweeping it out the door and the floor washs up as new.
Any questions-email me.
UPDATEoing it now i would buy the new 'click down" product.It's way better and no problem getting tight joints.No glue is required.There is alot of the old stuff around for under a dollar/ft but it's worth spending the extra.
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Old 01-03-2005, 10:35 PM   #19
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Foam

The foam is used only on floating floors, whether it is a part of the planks or is in a sheet. You don't use foam on glue-down floors. It is a good noise deadener.
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Old 01-03-2005, 10:41 PM   #20
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Red face installing wood floors

I dont know what a 'floating floor is' I have oak planks, this is not a peel and stick, it is raw wood that I will sand and finish also. I dont know where to start , from a plywood subflooring , do I need a foam rubber or moisture barrier? What is the best way to lay the oak so it wont pop up, staples, nails, glue? Thanks in advance.
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Old 01-04-2005, 08:42 AM   #21
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a "floating floor" is one that is not fastened to the subfloor, which allows independant movement of the finish floor and subfloor. Typically "planks" of some sort, either natural or engineered wood products, or laminate like "pergo". the pieces are attached to each other with glue, or in most cases now, with a locking tounge and groove system.

This is perfect for something like an RV that goes bouncing and twisting down the road, and is exposed to extreme temps, both hot and cold, which will cause expansion and contraction of most material.

I'm not sure what you bought, but your description "oak planks" sounds like standard 3/4" x 2 or 3" flooring that is meant for houses. Houses don't bounce around much, and the temperatures inside them are much more stable than in an RV left parked outside for most of the year with no heat/no a/c running. These t&g planks are meant to be nailed to the subfloor, and also to the underlying wood floor joists...airstreams don't have those. Nails are not a good way to fasten something that goes bouncing down the highway. they will work their way loose. Solid wood planks are also very heavy, compared to laminate or cork tiles.
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Old 01-11-2005, 08:37 PM   #22
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Bambam you have traditional hardwood flooring material. In the homes it was nailed through the tongue at a 45 degree angle with a special floor nailer. I have seen this flooring installed in other Airstreams and it makes a nice looking floor. There is a special adheavise for flooring and it is troweled on. Take your time and it will make a very nice job. I am getting ready to start the same project. I will be using a 3/8" oak flooring material, really a form or plywood but the method of installation is the same. Go to Bruce flooring and there is a blurb in there on installation. Best of luck.
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Old 01-11-2005, 10:17 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pahaska
The cork that I ordered comes only in case lots of 11 1' x 2' tiles. In order to determine whether 2 cases would cover the area, I measured the trailer and made a CAD image of the floor plan.

I laid out a tile at a reasonable starting point and then used the stamp function of the program to place additional tiles as needed to cover the whole area. Where the tiles extended out of the area, I could see what portion of the tile could be used elsewhere. I required that all joints must be factory edges.

I then went back and started numbering the tiles. The odd shape of the floor requires a lot of tile cutting. Part tiles are numbered 1a, 1b, etc.

I made 3 layouts using different starting alignments. In all 3 layouts, the 2 cases of cork will cover the area. What I did find out that one of the layouts involves much less tile cutting and fitting than the other two.
What did you seal the cork with.
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Old 01-13-2005, 09:22 AM   #24
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Pergo Flooring

Seems like most of the issues have been covered. This is what I am doing.
1. Removed carpets,padding and 1000's of staples.
2. Applied MinWax water base Polyurethane to the plywood
3. Dopped a plumb bob from the overhead rail and marked a line all the way
4. Left 1/4 inch on all sides
5. Latex caulked the 1/4 inch gap, no molding needed

The Pergo rep told me they will not warranty flooring in a travel trailer. Do not use plastic under the flooring.
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Old 01-16-2005, 06:27 AM   #25
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Cool New floor

Quote:
Originally Posted by gsymes
Seems like most of the issues have been covered. This is what I am doing.
1. Removed carpets,padding and 1000's of staples.
2. Applied MinWax water base Polyurethane to the plywood
3. Dopped a plumb bob from the overhead rail and marked a line all the way
4. Left 1/4 inch on all sides
5. Latex caulked the 1/4 inch gap, no molding needed

The Pergo rep told me they will not warranty flooring in a travel trailer. Do not use plastic under the flooring.
We completed installing a floating floor (Pergo) in our '75 Tradewind yesterday. Went is relatively easy. One hint, when cutting you want to use a carbide tipped saw.

I left a ¼ gap but I need to wait for warmer weather to caulk.

In the bathroom we chose linoleum. I was not comfortable with using laminate with weet feet from taking a shower. It also breaks things up nicely.
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Old 01-16-2005, 05:36 PM   #26
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Fake Slate

Brian,
Could you tell me more about the fake slate you used. I'm trying to find something for the entryway of my Classic TT. I did see, at the RV show today, that some of the higher end MHs had what appeared to be a granite/marble tile floor. Does anyone know of a product that would give this appearance but without the weight?
Thanks
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Old 01-16-2005, 06:13 PM   #27
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balrgn, looks good

Just as a note, I had to apply the caulking twice due to shrinkage. I am stopped at the bathroom for now trying to make up my mind what I want to do. I have had friends put the Pergo down in the bathrooms in their homes with good success, but not a travel trailer. Like you I don’t want to be on water patrol after every use.
I see you took the gaucho/sofa out are you planning to change the front end??
I am, so I went all the way to the forward end, and working up plans for a dinette set/full size bed. Also I am making the provisions for a convertible front interior, in case I ever sell (right). The new owner can have it both ways.
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Old 01-16-2005, 06:51 PM   #28
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M & M - Composite materials

M & M,

Since your in the Cape, source out a high level Marine Repair Yard or preferably a yacht builder. Ask the joiners for a look at their composite material vendor catalogs. You will find everything from slate, marble, aluminum, wood, etc. panels that are cored with aluminum or plastics, etc ... we use them in all facets of yacht construction for countertops, bulkhead panels and FLOORS.
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