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Old 08-18-2013, 08:10 PM   #1
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2012 Interstate Coach
Portland , Oregon
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Leveling your interstate

As some of you know my expeirence with RVing has been limite to my 36 foot boat, and while some of the systems are similar one thing I never had to worry about is leveling. So I need beginers lessons on this. Technics tools the whole nine yards
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Old 08-18-2013, 08:39 PM   #2
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Leveling in an Interstate is less important than in a trailer. The only things that leveling will affect are: (1) how the shower and galley sink drain; (2) how the waste tanks drain. Leveling will have no effect on the all-electric Nova Kool fridge, unlike the trailers' propane-fired Dometic fridges.

All you need is a simple bubble level, some leveling blocks, and some chocks. Set the bubble level on the floor or on the galley counter; either one works. See which side/end/corner of the Interstate is lowest based on the bubble in the level; it will be off-center to the high side. Place the leveling blocks in front of the wheels you need to elevate, and remember that if either/both rear wheels need to be elevated, you have to but leveling blocks under both dual tires, not just one. Drive up onto the leveling blocks, and chock the wheels that are still on the ground.

It doesn't have to be exact; close is good enough. If you're a little off-level, you want the driver's side to be slightly lower, since that provides the best drainage for the sinks and shower.
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Old 08-18-2013, 09:44 PM   #3
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So what do you use to level how do you feel about the various "lego" style blocks vs old fashon wood and if you use the comerical versions which ones and how many have you found you needed
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Old 08-18-2013, 10:54 PM   #4
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I bought a package of 8 from CW I have never used more then 6, once when boondocking. Never needed more then two at a campground. I only have one set of rear tires so your needs may vary.
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Old 08-18-2013, 11:44 PM   #5
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Because I have duals in the rear, I have two sets of Lego-style blocks. I prefer them to wood.
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Old 08-20-2013, 07:53 AM   #6
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I used the yellow lego blocks with the B190. I think I had two sets - one pack of 8 and one pack of 4, and there were a few times that I needed all of them (certain campsites with an annoying slope...sigh). We bought new orange blocks for the trailer, so I threw the yellow blocks in as part of the deal when we sold the B190.

No particular reason for switching brands (I think we went with the orange because we wanted new ones for the trailer, and that's what Camping World carried), although the orange blocks do have the option of an integrated wheel chock, which you probably don't care about (I often chocked my B190, but that's because I grew up in trailers - it didn't need a chock at all). Both brands worked just fine, though the orange ones are better about not catching small stones and such for when it's time to restack them. We did snap a yellow block in half one time (our fault, not a failure; I was trying to be clever), but even then we could still use it for some purposes just fine - in the middle of a stack, it doesn't matter that it's broken in half.

Wooden blocks would work, too, but you have to make them and seal them. Plus you have to store them somewhere - the plastic blocks come with a nice bag to store them in, which is nice if they're going to live inside the camper when not in use.

I saw a motorhome (Class C IIRC) a couple months ago without any leveling capability apparently. They scavenged a fair sized stone to drive up on. It looked unstable and cheap, and was probably hard on the belts in that tire. Don't take that route...do something better than that.
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