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-   -   Ford Explorer Sport Trac can tow...what? Only a 16? (https://www.airforums.com/forums/f368/ford-explorer-sport-trac-can-tow-what-only-a-16-a-27390.html)

WithChild 10-30-2006 05:10 PM

Ford Explorer Sport Trac can tow...what? Only a 16?
 
I am so new I haven't even got an Airstream yet. I'm thinking the ccd 16 is the one for me. Love the Quicksilver, but they are gone. I did hear that the ocean breeze interior will be available on all internationals...

Anyway, I'm wondering if my current truck is up to the task. I have two vehicles: a 2001 Sport Trac and a 2000 Eurovan camper. Am I nuts to think either one will tow a 16?

uwe 10-30-2006 05:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by WithChild
I am so new I haven't even got an Airstream yet. I'm thinking the ccd 16 is the one for me. Love the Quicksilver, but they are gone. I did hear that the ocean breeze interior will be available on all internationals...

Anyway, I'm wondering if my current truck is up to the task. I have two vehicles: a 2001 Sport Trac and a 2000 Eurovan camper. Am I nuts to think either one will tow a 16?

Not at all nuts. Some might argue.

Just this last weekend, a friend towed a 19" CCD Bambi for her first time, almost 600 miles on freeways, through questionable terrain and on windy, steep roads with a new Nissan Pathfinder, and had NO issue keeping up with my Suburban the whole time.
Another friend of mine tows with a Sport Trac V6, also a Bambi 19ft,and has 0 issues. This one tows in the hills of New Mexico.
You must make sure that the vehicles have factory tow setups, and use common sense. Do not exceed the tow rating.

overlander63 10-30-2006 06:19 PM

One of our forums members uses a VW Eurovan to tow his 16' trailer, and as long as he doesn't get in a hurry with it, he does well with it. You can search for user "crazylev" and see some of his posts, or even PM him about it.

davidz71 10-30-2006 09:13 PM

Don't forget, getting started is one thing, stopping is another. Someone from the forum with a similar setup should comment on the braking ability of this combination.

Fyrzowt 10-30-2006 10:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by davidz71
Don't forget, getting started is one thing, stopping is another. Someone from the forum with a similar setup should comment on the braking ability of this combination.

I've always wondered about this - The T/V has brakes designed for it and presumably for it's weight with a little extra for cargo, etc. The trailer has brakes for it's weight and presumably for some cargo.

Combo should be able to stop. ??

Seems like more problems are going to be in the handling and/or lack of power areas.

Input or comments?

I'm not speaking from a huge area of experience, but trying to apply some mechanical experience and common sense.

uwe 10-31-2006 06:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fyrzowt
I've always wondered about this - The T/V has brakes designed for it and presumably for it's weight with a little extra for cargo, etc. The trailer has brakes for it's weight and presumably for some cargo.

Combo should be able to stop. ??

Seems like more problems are going to be in the handling and/or lack of power areas.

Input or comments?

I'm not speaking from a huge area of experience, but trying to apply some mechanical experience and common sense.

Ideally the tow vehicle's brakes should be able to stop the entire rig, in case of complete trailer brake failure. At least once. When this becomes an issue, other tow vehicle factors come into play, like weight and wheel base.
In the case of the combo Pathfinder/Bambi 19, the tow vehicles brakes were more than adequate for this. We found out first hand, since the brand new Bambi was delivered with poorly adjusted brakes, that were not functioning, and the trailer had to be towed back to the dealer for brake repairs. Later, during the trip, the brakes were grabby at times, and marginal during the rest of the trip. However, the tow vehicle seemingly handled the trailer with ease. Needless to say, the trailer needs to go back for more brake adjustments, or perhaps replacement or brake components.
Handling and/or lack of power is also a concern, of course, but I guess stopping is definitely a main concern.

overlander63 10-31-2006 10:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fyrzowt
I've always wondered about this - The T/V has brakes designed for it and presumably for it's weight with a little extra for cargo, etc. The trailer has brakes for it's weight and presumably for some cargo.

Combo should be able to stop. ??

Seems like more problems are going to be in the handling and/or lack of power areas.

Input or comments?

Forida state law specifies the tow vehicle brakes must be able to safely stop the trailer without its brakes operating. The trailer still has to have operating brakes, but the above law is for a safety margin.

Road Ruler 10-31-2006 11:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by overlander63
Forida state law specifies the tow vehicle brakes must be able to safely stop the trailer without its brakes operating. The trailer still has to have operating brakes, but the above law is for a safety margin.

Safety is a priority.

Do you know the details of the law? Is there specification or guidelines that a combination must fall within? How do they test a combination to see if it stops safely?

Fyrzowt 10-31-2006 11:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by overlander63
Forida state law specifies the tow vehicle brakes must be able to safely stop the trailer without its brakes operating. The trailer still has to have operating brakes, but the above law is for a safety margin.

Thanks for the input, this law makes total sense now that I think about it. Cable connections are lost, brakes malfunction, etc.
That's a great thing about this site, all the viewpoints, angles of looking at an issue, experience. Keep it up!
Dave


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