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-   -   '71 Globetrotter Full Monte (https://www.airforums.com/forums/f416/71-globetrotter-full-monte-26902.html)

utee94 06-09-2008 01:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Aerowood (Post 573666)
Now would be the best time to, at the very least, install the Zip Dee mounting hardware. This is where nutplates are very handy. You will never have to worry about hardware coming loose, pulling out, or stripping out.

Makes sense. Is it possible to order just the mounting hardware and not the entire awning, in order to put off the expense of the awning until it's necessary?

vhord 06-09-2008 01:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by utee94 (Post 573706)
Is it possible to order just the mounting hardware and not the entire awning, in order to put off the expense of the awning until it's necessary?

I do not know if it would be cost effective buying it in parts. Maybe no difference. However, I am not sure how you would know the bracket locations without the complete awning being available. I have never installed one. Someone with experience might be able to shed some light on this.

I need to move this to another thread so as not to hijack Kip's.

Aerowood 06-12-2008 03:02 PM

door hinge
 
5 Attachment(s)
I was able to get my hands another main entry door hinge but it was worn like my current one . I ordered bronze bushing from Mcmaster & Carr and installed them to day. The hinge is now real tight, almost to tight. Pic #1 shows it in the mill followed but installing the bushings then lapping the hinge pin to the bushing and then assembled. I also ordered new stainless steel rod for the hinge pin.

Frank's Trailer Works 06-12-2008 04:19 PM

blown away again...

monocoque 06-12-2008 04:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Aerowood (Post 575389)
I was able to get my hands another main entry door hinge but it was worn like my current one . I ordered bronze bushing from Mcmaster & Carr and installed them to day. The hinge is now real tight, almost to tight. Pic #1 shows it in the mill followed but installing the bushings then lapping the hinge pin to the bushing and then assembled. I also ordered new stainless steel rod for the hinge pin.

Nice! Is the mill used to install the bushings? Just curious but is that a rivet gun I see sitting there? :)

Aerowood 06-12-2008 04:40 PM

No, I just pulled them in with a nut and bolt. The bushing compressed a little so I had a hard time removing the bolt on the first one, so after I got it out I turned it down in diameter for the rest.

monocoque 06-12-2008 05:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Aerowood (Post 575448)
No, I just pulled them in with a nut and bolt. The bushing compressed a little so I had a hard time removing the bolt on the first one, so after I got it out I turned it down in diameter for the rest.

What role does the mill play in the process?

Aerowood 06-12-2008 06:14 PM

I had to bore the exisiting oblonged hinge pin holes to .311 to recieve the bronze bushing that had an OD of .3125 and an ID of .250. I then used lapping compound on the new hinge pin to open them back up after the bushing compressed due to the interferance fit of .0015. The pin is still pretty tight but it will wear in. It has zero slop at this point. I can now start the door reskin and new style latch now that I have a zero droop door hinge.

HiHoAgRV 06-12-2008 07:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Aerowood (Post 575512)
... I then used lapping compound on the new hinge pin to open them back up after the bushing compressed ...

I'll toss this to the folks that may not be familar with bronze bushings, ya' gotta flush 'um pretty good after lapping or cutting because the same properties that allows them to hold oil for self lubing, also holds abrasives:sad: when your done.

Aerowood 06-12-2008 09:19 PM

Yes it took a bit to get the lapping compound cleaned out. First was the solvent tank and a bore brush followed with acetone and a cleaned 32 caliber bore brush followed by rifle cleaning pads.

Zeppelinium 06-12-2008 10:47 PM

why does everything have to be a science project on vintage Airstreams?

Hello?

IndyAnne 06-13-2008 03:51 AM

'cause you have to start from scratch on just about everything, 'cause hardly anything that was original is made anymore; most of the good stuff lasts, but some of it doesn't; what's made now is intended to become obsolete and thrown away rather than renewed from time to time; like these hinges -- they don't make 'em like this anymore -- on purpose! Ever tried to get anything done at the factory? With a few exceptions, they don't want to fix up, they want to sell you a new one.

anybody else?

Frank's Trailer Works 06-13-2008 04:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Zeppelinium (Post 575617)
why does everything have to be a science project on vintage Airstreams?

Hello?

wait a minute... you did a scientific study of I think it was insulation. You built some kind of mini wall section I recall and shined lights or something... wish I could remember (lose of memory is due to some not so scientific experimentation) but anyhow, I remember it was you... oh lookie here... https://www.airforums.com/forums/f46/...sts-40442.html You want to talk about a science experiment. I remember reading that thread and wondering and thinking "that dude is serious about this airstream stuff, he is freakin testing insullation of all things"

To each his own Zep. Many drums, many beats, many feets, and sometimes some super feats.

IndyAnne 06-13-2008 04:10 AM

So, are you just cranky or are you yankin' Kip's chain?


Quote:

Originally Posted by Zeppelinium (Post 575617)
why does everything have to be a science project on vintage Airstreams?

Hello?


utee94 06-13-2008 06:54 AM

I don't think Zep was attacking Kip, I think he was lamenting and commiserating...

:D

monocoque 06-13-2008 07:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Zeppelinium (Post 575617)
why does everything have to be a science project on vintage Airstreams?

Hello?

Sorry Zep...It was I asking all the silly questions! Kip was keeping it simple. But then I like science projects! Especially on these old trailers. Just wish I were more of a scientist...than a pirate. :D

Aerowood 06-13-2008 09:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by monocoque (Post 575444)
Just curious but is that a rivet gun I see sitting there? :)

No that is a 1/2" drive pneumatic drill motor. When I first started the lapping process the pin was so tight in the bushings that I needed a little more horsepower to get it to spin. After I did the initial lapping I switched over to the drill seen in the picture to finish it up. I had the lapping done and cleaned up when I took the picture because it makes a big mess and I didn't dare touch my camera with lapping compound all over my hands. For those that don't know what lapping compound is, it is basically fine abrasive paste.

Aerowood 06-13-2008 09:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Zeppelinium (Post 575617)
why does everything have to be a science project on vintage Airstreams?

Hello?

Goodmorning Zep. sure seems like it sometimes

Zeppelinium 06-13-2008 10:20 AM

Zep replies
 
Ahem! I love science projects. Did I forget to say "amazing" science projects? Did I forget to say "damn, why didn't I think of that?" Did I forget to say "boy, am I impressed with the skills of the members of this community?" Did I forget to say "man, I sure am humbled every time I get on the forums?" Did I forget to say "geez, wish I had that tool!"? :blink: Did I forget to say "buddy, I commiserate with you--why does everthing have to be a science project?"

Now, just to be clear, I intend to happily subject the community to many more science projects. We will delve into arcane topics, debating even the inconsequential nuances. :smartass:

But, why can't the occasional repair just be simple, easy, straightforward, just like you planned it, quick? Why does the "correct" repair require an in-depth understanding of metalurgy, fatigue, fastener mechanics, humidity, vapor condensation, compatibility of elastomers, adhesion and durability of paint, strenght of materials, stress risers, color variations in aluminum alloys, proper esthetics of repair appearance, axle spring rates, vibration induced failure in electrical harnesses, blah blah blah? :sad:

One day I'd like to just take a piece of aluminum and screw it to the shell and say "ha, problem solved!" :bb:

I love learning, but once in a while I'd like a quickie, thank you very much. :D

Zep,
your terse communicator :neutral:
your man of sometimes too few words
but just glad to be here :)

Jim & Susan 06-13-2008 11:42 AM

You left out "man of great humor". :brows:

I'm with you, but I actually had a simple one last weekend. I hooked up the 35 year air conditioner and it actually worked without the excess use of oversized hand tools, exotic fasteners, farming implements or extreme language. I waited for the other show to fall for two days. Still working. Unbelievably.

Jim


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