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dbj216 09-05-2018 07:48 PM

Holly cow Kemosabi, that's a lot of circuits. You're making a CAD computer lab out of your Safari. You verified Airstream history as the "univolt" 12v for everything didn't come to production until the early sixties if I remember right. Old Mr. Byam wanted everyone to have all the comforts of home from a 12v battery and a propane tank. It kinda worked for a night or two. He added a battery charger to the mix when "shore power" was available. I think Airstream was a leader in this. Airstream did have park models with 120v water heaters, refrigerators, and outlets with minimum 12v stuff.

Getting the electrical installed is huge. The fresh water plumbing will be a piece of cake now that you have the holding tanks done.

David

steinVT 09-06-2018 03:57 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by dbj216 (Post 2152270)
Holly cow Kemosabi, that's a lot of circuits.
David

Probably more than I needed, but some were run just to position the on/off switches where I wanted. My Safari was a park model so the only 12v was for a single light and it ran off of the car hookup. I also added separate circuits for the refrigerator and for a future microwave.

Here is what's going to run it all. It's a 100 amp hour AGM deep discharge and man is it heavy. It will be mounted under a bed in the rear.
Attachment 321684

lonewolf1977 09-06-2018 06:03 AM

Wow....love the chimney. Looks fabulous!

66Overlander 09-06-2018 10:02 AM

I love how people call their 1950s Airstreams "park models". There was no such thing. That's how all Airstreams and other brand travel trailers were back then. Basically no 12V except a dome lamp or two powered by the tow vehicle battery. Airstream was a leader in changing that, with a 12V battery and other 12V amenities, like water pumps and dual voltage 120V/12V lamps and fans, but no charger, first being part of the optional International package in 1958, and then becoming standard on all Airstreams by the early 1960s. The Univolt 12V battery charger first appeared in 1964 models, at which time the dual voltage lamps and fans were replaced with dedicated 12V devices.

Propane fridges and water heaters were options a couple years before the International package was created. Those were then integrated into the International package and finally became standard in the early 1960s.

steinVT 09-07-2018 03:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 66Overlander (Post 2152486)
I love how people call their 1950s Airstreams "park models". There was no such thing.

Although there was no official model called the "park model", I can't think of a phrase that communicates the level of amenities better. With no black tank or battery it's likely most of the camping was done in parks. Not likely boon-docking in Walmart.

OTRA15 09-07-2018 04:53 AM

:D

Walmart? Maybe Sears, Monkie Ward, or JC Penny in the 50’s — any old photos of Airstreams in shopping center parking lots?

Bohacks in the east or Safeway in the west?

A different era for sure.

Your work looks great! Thanks for documenting it so well.

Peter

steinVT 09-14-2018 06:14 AM

Insulation Done
 
2 Attachment(s)
So the insulation is done and I am starting to put back in the walls. It is kind of fun taking stuff from the barn/basement and putting it into the Safari. When you spread it out it is amazing how much room it takes up.

The final insulation scheme was a layer of PRODEX glued to the outer skin and then 1 1/2" of rock wool glued to that. One of the reasons I chose rock wool over fiberglass was I didn't think it would be itchy. I think it's not as bad as glass, but it is still an irritant.
Attachment 322485

After Bubba's post regarding his end caps varying in insulation thickness from 3/4" to 1 1/2", I decided to utilize a different approach. I glued a layer of PRODEX on the skin and taped the joints with AL metal tape. Then I added another layer of PRODEX on the end cap again taping the joints. So there are two layers of PRODEX separated with an air gap. Seems to work very well as the trailer now stays cool even in the sun. Kind of looked a bit like a satellite getting ready for launch.
Attachment 322486

steinVT 09-17-2018 05:38 AM

New Window Screens
 
3 Attachment(s)
This was one of the things I have been dreading since we bought the trailer. All of the larger window screens were gone. This era trailer has the screens that are crimped into place into a groove around the perimeter. Others on this forum removed all of the window frames, about 80 rivets each, so they could replace the screens. A very big job.

I am happy to report that isn't necessary. If the widow trim pieces are removed, a great little tool from Vintage Trailer Supply (VTS) does the trick.
Attachment 322736

You have to use galvanized screen, also available from VTS, because it will hold a crimp. I cut the blanks out with 1/2" extra on the top and bottom and 3/4" extra on the sides. I also was very careful to follow the row within the screen so I didn't have a bunch of loose ends. Hard to see but here is an example of a completed window.
Attachment 322737

Of course at the same time I removed the window, disassembled it, polished all of the window frame pieces, polished around the window and drip cap and replaced all of the screw hardware and window gaskets (VTS).
Attachment 322738

My wife and I spent a lot of time worrying about this and it turned out to be one of the lesser projects.

Bubba L 09-17-2018 05:56 AM

That heavy duty galvanized screen should last a long time. Have you installed the screen on your door yet? I wish there was a better design for the door screen installation. I just reinstalled the way it was originally. For whatever reason, the original screen had been spray painted black by a PO. When I removed the original, I realized it was bronze screening. The only place in the trailer that was bronze. We went ahead and replaced it with the same. Good luck, Bubba

OTRA15 09-17-2018 06:11 AM

The good news about galvanized screen is that it will hold a crimp, as you say.

There may be bad news, however -- in my opinion -- as that screen will corrode especially in salt air mist, and may cause a galvanic reaction with the aluminum frame, and even with the exterior aluminum skin of the trailer, when moisture drips down from the screen.

These are just guesses based on years of construction experience on oceanfront homes which receive lots of salt-laden mist/fog which condensates on the copper [bronze?] screens in wood frames. The run-off from the screens stains everything under each one, but the owners like the look because it is part of the notion that "the house is alive, and changing all the time based on the weather." If that floats your boat, OK! Others may not like it IMO.

Fiberglas screen would avoid the above issues, and the trick to getting it to "stay" in the groove is to use a slightly thicker spline material, and stretch it just enough, as you roll it in, that it will stay put!

Also, does your tool have ball bearings at the shaft? The pro's find such a tool much easier to use, and both the convex and concave screen tools come that way. Your tool only appears to have a rounded convex edge? There is also a tool which is concave on the edge, designed to push the spline into the groove with commanding force.

Thanks again for all the details of your restoration, very inspiring!

Peter

PS -- Screen tool with ball bearings and both wheels: https://www.amazon.com/Prime-Line-Pr...ds=screen+tool
Other posts on screen techniques/tools here: https://www.google.com/search?q=OTRA...com&gws_rd=ssl
Bronze screen: https://www.jamestowndistributors.co...ct.do?pid=1247

steinVT 09-17-2018 08:07 PM

Screens
 
1 Attachment(s)
Bubba, I did replace the screen on the door already so it may have to wait until next time for the bronze. I think I would have liked the look. I agree that's a lot of rivets to drill and set just to replace the screen.

Peter, the tool is unlike anything I have used before. Here is another picture taken from the VTS web site.
Attachment 322821

It has a large diameter on one side of the wheel and the rest is flat. It does have bearings and seems to be a good quality tool. As far as I know, these windows were never meant to be used with a spline as the edges are rolled over, not an extruded channel. I don't think you could get a spline to stay with fiberglass.

OTRA15 09-17-2018 09:23 PM

Thanks for the clarification, that makes sense!

Peter

islandtrader 09-18-2018 07:35 AM

With out the tool almost impossible to install the screen.

steinVT 10-04-2018 07:20 PM

Door Updates
 
5 Attachment(s)
I continue to be impressed just how much time the little projects take.

The main door had a dead bolt that looked like it was only used during transport as it used a screwdriver instead of a key. I replaced that with a standard deadbolt that should be very secure. Required a bit of trimming of the door, but not too bad.

Here is the original:
Attachment 324452

And the replacement:
Attachment 324451 Attachment 324453

I then built a door stop based on the original. Here is the new one next old one. It was worth building new just to skip the polishing step.
Attachment 324454

Here it is installed next to a door holder from Vintage Trailer Supply.
Attachment 324455

I bought a replacement handle for the Bargman door handle as the original is heavily pock marked. Pricey, but very pretty. I removed the pin and washer from the main square shaft and thought it should just slide out, but it appears to be held in by something. Is there a trick to removing the handle?

Bubba L 10-04-2018 07:46 PM

No trick in removing the L54 handle as far as I know. Like you said, you have the washer and roll pin. The square shaft goes through the bushing. Interesting. Ií Take a closer look at mine tomorrow. Does your key and lock cylinder work? Bubba

Bubba L 10-04-2018 08:14 PM

You also have the H20 spring in the handle assembly. Bubba

steinVT 10-05-2018 02:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bubba L (Post 2164433)
No trick in removing the L54 handle as far as I know. Like you said, you have the washer and roll pin. The square shaft goes through the bushing. Interesting. Ií Take a closer look at mine tomorrow. Does your key and lock cylinder work? Bubba

I replaced the lock cylinder with one from VTS. Although it kind of worked, I never really figured out the locking sequence, thus the upgraded dead bolt.

I wonder if I need to take the washer and roll pin off of the lock shaft as well, then remove the face plate, lock and handle as a unit. Maybe the handle roll pin is accessible off the door.

islandtrader 10-05-2018 07:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by steinVT (Post 2164489)
I replaced the lock cylinder with one from VTS. Although it kind of worked, I never really figured out the locking sequence, thus the upgraded dead bolt.

I wonder if I need to take the washer and roll pin off of the lock shaft as well, then remove the face plate, lock and handle as a unit. Maybe the handle roll pin is accessible off the door.

Did you check out Bubba's rebuild thread? Start at post 194:lol:

57Vintage 10-05-2018 09:40 AM

1 Attachment(s)
I may be mistaken, but I don't think the door stop you replicated was original. These are identical to the ones I took off my rig.

Attachment 324479

The small one hold the inner door. The large one is a door stop and holder combined. VTS sells both.

dbj216 10-05-2018 05:22 PM

You are right, small projects like installing a new dead bolt do take a lot of time. We often say it takes 10 times longer to reassemble an Airstream than it did to tear it apart.

David


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