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-   -   1948 LINER - A 70 Year Journey (https://www.airforums.com/forums/f60/1948-liner-a-70-year-journey-176336.html)

Disco Stu 01-01-2022 12:23 AM

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G'day Tim, I made a pair of 1.2mm ( approx .051 ) 5052 angles and riveted them together with staggered joints.
I used the shrinker to curve the outside angle and prefer a flat anvil in the english wheel to the stretcher to curve the inner angle. Slowly working them to match a pattern drawn on the tabletop, they did the job.
Happy new year peeps!
Stu

DavidsonOverlander 01-01-2022 10:41 AM

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Disco Stu (Post 2565868)
G'day Tim, I made a pair of 1.2mm ( approx .051 ) 5052 angles and riveted them together with staggered joints.
I used the shrinker to curve the outside angle and prefer a flat anvil in the english wheel to the stretcher to curve the inner angle. Slowly working them to match a pattern drawn on the tabletop, they did the job.
Happy new year peeps!
Stu

I used a similar method to created curved pieces for the roof of my Avion truck camper. I used a Harbor Freight stretcher/shrinker set. The pieces were short because they were just used to trim out a roof hatch.

MrRivet 01-16-2022 06:34 PM

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Thanks everyone for the input on how to solve my dilemma for the rib repair.
My first thoughts were to build a hammer form and replicate the damaged ribs. After a trip shopping for hard wood to fabricate the forms from, I returned home empty handed and suffering from sticker shock. With everyoneís suggestions I decided that I would try bending some thicker pieces of aluminum in the different alloys that were suggested.

I knew my home made metal brake had limitations on the thickness that it could bend but I didnít know what that thickness would be. I originally built it to bend C-channel for the floor perimeter which it did quite well. I started with a piece of .063 thick 6061-T-6 and I struggled to get a good satisfactory brake on it so I decided that was not going be an option for the repair. The brake had too much flex to form a consistent bend across the entire trial piece. I knew that I had broke .040 5052 H32 in the past so I placed an order for .050 thickness 5052 sheet to make the repairs. When I received the .050 5052, I was able to make a successful bend so I decided that is what I would use to make the repairs.

I decided that I would sister in two angles into the most severely damaged areas on two of the ribs and utilize a single angle in the remaining areas with small stress cracks. I used a shrinker/stretcher to form the angles to match the interior contour of the ribs. To stabilize the cracks, I drilled the ends of the cracks with a #40 drill bit. I am satisfied with the results.

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dbj216 01-16-2022 07:15 PM

Well done Mr. Rivet: There is not many of us on these forums that I have met that could fabricate a curved rib from scratch. It sure looks like it will do the job nicely.

David

fastrob 01-19-2022 09:33 AM

Riveting attention to detail.
Sorry, could not help myself.
Beautiful work, a labor of love, thanks for sharing.

MrRivet 02-09-2022 07:46 AM

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Thanks for the compliments!
This week we started the replacement of the three new roof skin panels. The existing roof panels were in very bad shape. As we found on the rear end segments, there were areas of corrosion that went completely through the panels and were actually crumbling in spots. We really donít like replacing the original panels but there is no way to save them so replacement is our only option.

Safe Travels!!
Tim
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dbj216 02-09-2022 06:28 PM

Wow, that is bad corrosion of the aluminum skins. I presume they are Alclad skins which are supposedly less likely to corrode. Maybe your 1948 Airstream was a Florida resident and subject to the salty sea breezes. Are you using Alclad for the new skins?

You are doing an amazing job on all that sheet metal work.

David

MrRivet 02-09-2022 07:02 PM

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Thanks David!
We think the trailer has spent its entire life in Florida with part of the time being in south Florida. The trailer was built with 24 ST Alclad which was the old designation for 2024-T3 Alclad thatís found today. The original ink markings are still visible on the insides of the skins. We are using all new 2024-T3 Alclad for the replacement panels. On some of the original panels the corrosion had penetrated the entire thickness of the metal and you could break off pieces by hand without much effort. There are a couple of panels that had holes large enough to pass your hand through.

Safe Travels!!

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steinVT 02-10-2022 03:25 AM

Very nice and you will make the final polishing just that much easier. ;)- Mark

MrRivet 05-05-2022 07:11 AM

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Itís been a busy couple of months at the Rivet house. We have been able to squeeze in work on the Liner but havenít had time to sit down and make update posts here. The next 2 or 3 posts should catch us up to where we currently are. We have completed the roof skin installation with new aluminum. We estimate roughly 500 to 600 solid rivets set on these three panels to complete the installation.

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coloradoup 05-05-2022 09:06 PM

Looking good
 
Ok so, what's the secret? How do you get such a perfect looking rivet without having a big dimple where the rivet is? Yours look like they were done by a machine. We are definitely doing something wrong! Fantastic work.

Disco Stu 05-06-2022 01:05 AM

Very nice!!!

MsRivet 05-06-2022 08:13 AM

The answer youíve been looking for Ö
 
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Quote:

Originally Posted by coloradoup (Post 2596102)
Ok so, what's the secret? How do you get such a perfect looking rivet without having a big dimple where the rivet is? Yours look like they were done by a machine. We are definitely doing something wrong! Fantastic work.

When I started this thread I thought that I would be the one doing most of the posts. Obviously now MrRivet has taken over this thread and he also does the majority of the metal work. However he canít do all of it himself. So the answer to your question is to put the woman on the pneumatic gun. Ladies have a gentler finesse! Itís also about the pressure settings on the gun, the pressure of my hold against the rivet and not over driving the rivets. We have used both soft and hard solid rivets. Each requiring their own touch. Also I must add about the communication that must happen between myself and MrRivet on the bucking bar. We make a great team and are still married!

A few other notes Ö I do fit up through the vent holes. And I know that there is no crying in Airstreaming. However I have recently started on restoring the windows.

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dbj216 05-06-2022 06:47 PM

We should start calling you Rosie the Riveter. Women built a lot of aircraft in the 1940s. I once toured the Airstream factory, and our tour guide talked about the finesse needed to drive a rivet and not get the dimple. It takes training and practice.

You folks are building a brand new old Airstream. It will be so cool when done.

David

MsRivet 05-06-2022 08:22 PM

Hey David!

You would not be the first to make that reference to me. Long story Ö I go by my middle name BUT my first name BEGINS with Ö you guessed it Ö RoseÖ!! Hah. And to you, Coloradoup and everyone else Iíll take this as a compliment. Of all things so far in relation to this 1948 Airstream Liner, I am most proud of my riveting skills that I have acquired. (besides MrRivets mad metal working skills) My polishing techniques are currently in the works!

coloradoup 05-06-2022 10:24 PM

That's kind of what I was expecting. I have had the feeling I should put my wife on the gun and me on the bucking bar. your work is amazing and kind of makes me think I should start all over. Oh well, too late for that but I'm going to get her on the gun and me on the other end. You guys do amazing work and it's a pleasure to see it come together.

MrRivet 05-25-2022 06:43 AM

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Roof rib and vent supports installed. Ready for new vent installation. Attachment 416476

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Safe Travels!!
Tim

dbj216 05-25-2022 06:24 PM

There sure is a lot of shinny aluminum under that new roof you made. Certainly building your own "Liner" is not an easy job. It will be beautiful when finished.

David

steinVT 05-26-2022 03:03 AM

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That is a bunch of shiny aluminum.

Couple of questions. What are you using for vents? VTS hasn't had the Fantastic Fan that I like forever.

And what are you using to hold on your vents? Took me a minute to realize I was looking at half the connection and it's reflection. Thanks. - Mark
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