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gomotomoto 09-25-2014 05:00 PM

Bear education 101
 
Ok. I've never run into a bear but I hear you shouldn't try to pet them ;)

Assume I know nothing about them. What do are you supposed to do if you do see one. How about my rats (kids) what do I tell them to do if they encounter one?

We are headed into some places that have bear warnings so I figured I'd ask about em'

Wayne&Sam 09-25-2014 05:10 PM

Don't surprise them. Make noise so they know you are there. That's probably not a problem for the kids.

If they see one, stay together in
a close group and retreat calmly. Do not run. You can't outrun them and it can only trigger the prey response.


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NevadaGeo 09-25-2014 05:39 PM

Put out a bunch of strong pine sol in your trailer to help make it smell less attractive for them to want to go inside. Don't have any bacon smell in or near your trailer.

gomotomoto 09-25-2014 05:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by NevadaGeo (Post 1516060)
Put out a bunch of strong pine sol in your trailer to help make it smell less attractive for them to want to go inside. Don't have any bacon smell in or near your trailer.


Bacon? Interesting.... I guess I feel like eating bacon when I smell it too...

switz 09-25-2014 05:48 PM

Suggest leaving dogs home. They can be bear food if they get loose. :sad::sad:

gdod25 09-25-2014 09:12 PM

Unpredictable and opportunistic, a grizzly may just want you out of its territory but if pursued by a black bear it probably wants to do you harm.

Stefrobrts 09-25-2014 09:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by switz (Post 1516063)
Suggest leaving dogs home. They can be bear food if they get loose. :sad::sad:

I've heard the problem with dogs is that they can outrun a bear, but it will chase them right back home to you!

Loose dogs in any wilderness area are a bad idea. Every year we probably see ten or more lost dog postings in our area for dogs lost hiking, which is the worst kind of lost, because at least in town they have a better chance to be spotted. Better to keep them nearby and under your control!

Tyvekcat 09-25-2014 09:37 PM

Bear
 
Black Bears can run very fast. I have seen them run and it was quite surprising how nimble and quick the bear was. Generally they hear you coming first or smell you, so they move quietly behind the scene. Did a lot of hiking on the AT, back in the day, and only seen two. But we talked a lot and I guess they heard us coming.

They are an interesting animal. Yeah I wouldn't want to pet them either, LOL
Have fun out there and stay safe ! Always let someone know where you are, and when you should be there, while hiking.

LawChick 09-25-2014 11:23 PM

Bear Tacos
 
:rolleyes: Just park near tent campers. Then, in your trailer, you don't have to worry about bears. Even bears are smart enough to know tents are easier to enter than trailers. Rangers call tents "bear tacos" when in bear country.

And don't read "Some Bears Kill" or you'll scare the britches off yourself and be "bear wary" for the rest of your life and buy bear spray by the case! How do I know that? Let's just say I made a stupid reading choice right before going to Glacier National Park. At least it wasn't Alaska. LOL

LawChick 09-25-2014 11:27 PM

Seriously, don't worry. I did. I was afraid to cook in the trailer. Afraid to leave windows open. Shoot, I was just afraid. But then in actuality we had to drive to another part of the park (Many Glacier) and look hard and wait to finally see grizzlies. Saw three in one day. All of them were eating blueberries - not people. Even though people, being smart like some are, were getting way too close!

Protagonist 09-26-2014 04:53 AM

1 Attachment(s)
I downloaded this from another Forums thread a couple of years ago— it seems appropriate…:innocent:

gomotomoto 09-26-2014 05:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Protagonist (Post 1516240)
I downloaded this from another Forums thread a couple of years ago— it seems appropriate…:innocent:


Ahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha!!!!!!!

gomotomoto 09-26-2014 05:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Protagonist (Post 1516240)
I downloaded this from another Forums thread a couple of years ago— it seems appropriate…:innocent:


Still laughing !!!!

PharmGeek 09-26-2014 07:34 AM

I want to photograph them one day....with a LONG lens :D (right now I only have a 70-200mm nikon lens, f4 as my longest lens)

I am guessing baby bears could prove a dangerous scenario as well? As in parent(s) nearby very territorial?

richw46 09-26-2014 08:23 AM

A bear story
 
My son used to live in Vail, CO. After a long day at work he went to the grocery rather late. It was well past dark when he got back to his apartment, which was on the second floor of a large house in a secluded neighborhood.

He took 2 armloads of groceries from the carport to the apartment door, propped it open, went upstairs and dropped off the first bags. He went back for the second load and again, went upstairs to the kitchen. When he got there he found two black bear cubs checking out his apartment. They were in the bedroom, living room and mostly, the kitchen.

He didn't know what to do, so he started yelling at them, waving his arms. The bears seemed to think it was entertainment and just sat still and watched him. He tried several times but they would just stop what they were doing and look at him. Finally, the cubs got bored and went down the stairs and outside.

Relieved, my son started back to his truck for the rest of his groceries. Then it dawned on him: where's mama??? He called a neighbor who came over with a shotgun and stood guard while my son got the rest of the groceries inside the apartment. Afterward, his friend said "Do your grocery shopping in the daytime", smiled and left.

My son never did see the mama bear but now he keeps the door closed and doesn't shop after dark anymore.

Other than a bear coming through a resort area where we stay in Wisconsin, I don't have any personal experience with them. But I've been told that you NEVER want to run away from a black bear. They think you're food and will come after you. It's best to stand your ground and make yourself look as big as possible while slowly moving at a right angle to the bear's position. They are excellent climbers so don't even think about going up a tree. They swim well too.

Mostly, they won't bother you; mostly:huh:

polarlyse 09-26-2014 08:59 AM

Recently here in NJ we had someone killed by a Black Bear. Recently as in the past few weeks. He was with a group and they all scattered and RAN in different directions. First mistake was the group separating. Second mistake was running. Don't ever forget you cannot outrun them. If you see baby bears, Moma is not far away.

youngpeck 09-26-2014 09:51 AM

1 Attachment(s)
See page two and three of this NPS publication, specifically "Backpacking and Bears," "Food and Bears," "Recommended Camp Setup in Bear Counrty," and "Bear Pepper Sprays."

Foiled Again 09-26-2014 11:44 AM

Do not rely on your Airstream to protect you from bears. Bears can and do break into steel cars, an aluminum Airstream is much less sturdy. Your Airstream merely makes you crunchy on the outside, chewy on the inside.

The more bear/human interaction there is the less afraid the bears are.

Self defense against bears is a little like self-defense against human predators...
  1. be alert
  2. have bear spray at hand
  3. have a small campfire going, and fuel to make it a BIG one close at hand
  4. stay in groups
  5. never look or smell like EASY prey
  6. be selfish enough to let others look weaker or yummier!

gomotomoto 09-26-2014 01:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Foiled Again (Post 1516349)
Do not rely on your Airstream to protect you from bears. Bears can and do break into steel cars, an aluminum Airstream is much less sturdy. Your Airstream merely makes you crunchy on the outside, chewy on the inside.



The more bear/human interaction there is the less afraid the bears are.



Self defense against bears is a little like self-defense against human predators...
  1. be alert
  2. have bear spray at hand
  3. have a small campfire going, and fuel to make it a BIG one close at hand
  4. stay in groups
  5. never look or smell like EASY prey
  6. be selfish enough to let others look weaker or yummier!


OooooMg. You guys are so funny!!! And scary!!!

Protagonist 09-26-2014 01:21 PM

A serious suggestion, have a handheld air horn handy to scare away the bears:
Amazon.com: Wolo WOL497 Hand Held Air Horn: Automotive
In addition to making a good bear-scarer, it also lets other people know you're in trouble.


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