RV News RVBusiness 2021 Top 10 RVs of the Year, plus 56 additional debuts and must-see units → ×
 


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 01-13-2021, 11:16 PM   #1
1 Rivet Member
 
Ventura , California
Join Date: Jan 2021
Posts: 8
Question Is Total Rehab Really Necessary?

Hello, I'll start by saying that I am a newbie and I know that I will not be giving you enough information to give real advice. But I will try my best.

I live in Southern California/Central Coast where rent is CRAYCRAY. Currently paying $1400 for a crappy little 1 bedroom and that is the best we (fiancee and I) could find. Thus I have been on the lookout for a "house hack" situation for a while now.

I was helping move some stuff at a friend of a friend's house whose grandparents passed a year or so ago. I noticed an old Airstream surrounded by a bunch of junk (run down house, junk everywhere) and got a head-lightbulb. A 1975 Sovereign 31' (rear bath). I asked if I could check it out and it looks really nice inside - no signs of water damage, everything looks clean and cozy - no dust or signs of rodents/bugs. I asked if they would be selling it and they said yes. I asked how much, and they said somebody offered them $4k for it. So I figured maybe they'd give it to me for $5k.

I am a handy person. I work at a fabrication shop; the owner of which told me I could park it there while I fix it up. After doing a small amount of research, I very excitedly made a plan:

- Purchase for $5k
- Replace tires, axles, brakes
- Park at work for renovation
- Re-seal exterior
- Replace all gaskets and yellowed skylights
- Replace any other rubber/plastic parts that are out of order
- Replace any appliances that needed replacing
- Tear out single beds in middle and build a queen bed that folds up somehow
- Clean everything really well
- Paint interior mostly white to open up the space
- Pergo floors
- Possibly New counter tops? Other minor improvements?
- Spend no more than $10k on renovations
- Find some land to plop it on and live in it paying no more than half as much rent than previous crappy little 1 bedroom apartment (but preferably less than that)
- Possibly sell it in a few years once we've saved up some money for a real house, preferably for close to the amount of money I put into it

After reading the forums and watching YouTube videos it seems like I may be totally naive thinking this is possible. From what I'm hearing, an AS of this vintage must be TOTALLY GUTTED AND WORKED ON FOR THOUSANDS OF HOURS to be safe and comfortable and livable. I don't want to believe it! Why can't I just live in this little tin can?? I am not going to be taking it all over the country, into the mountains, off-roading, boondocking, I don't need an Instagram Paradise; I just want to set it on some land and live in it. Is this really a bad idea?

James Brehm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2021, 11:27 PM   #2
Rivet Master
 
InsideOut's Avatar

 
1956 22' Safari
Vintage Kin Owner
Conifer/Evergreen , Colorado
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 12,328
Images: 108
Quote:
Originally Posted by James Brehm View Post
Why can't I just live in this little tin can??
You can. If it’s “cozy & comfortable” enough for you, go for it. The biggest issues you may have if you are "just plopping it on some land" are:

1) where? A lot of areas don't allow this...
2) how are you going to get water to it?
3) how are you going to dump it?
4) what about electric?

Good luck with whatever you decide to do ~

Shari
__________________
Vintage Airstream Club - Past President 2007/2008
WBCCI #1824 - DenCO Unit Past President (2005)
AIR #30 - Join Date: 2-25-2002

RMVAC | WBCCI DenCO Unit | BIRDY - our 1956 Safari | 1964 Serro Scotty
InsideOut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2021, 11:35 PM   #3
4 Rivet Member
 
redthies's Avatar
 
Currently Looking...
1974 29' Ambassador
1963 19' Globetrotter
Whiterock , British Columbia
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 276
Hi James. Welcome to Airforums. Iím also a James, and surf at Hobson regularly so I wonít steer you wrong. I should mention I restore/renovate Airstreams for a living.

First things first, there is a TON of great info on here, but to put it mildly, most of the people on here way overthink things (which is good and bad), and a lot of them are coming at things in a different way than you. First off, you donít need to rush out and replace axles. Check/repack wheel bearings, and make sure the tires are safe and hold air. If you are just taking the trailer to your work to rehab it, call a tow truck to move it and save the hassles of lights, brakes etc for the first move. When you have it at your work, start going through things. If there isnít a bunch of leaks and rot or rodent damage, you might get away with a very minimal remodel to make it liveable. Find someone who knows RVs to help you test all the appliances and waterlines etc. If the trailer is in Ventura County, you know it wonít have been frozen before and water lines burst. Go through it, clean it up and test things.

Once you find what it needs, you can get that sorted and then take on the decorating side of things. Inland RV in Corona has lots of parts, as well as Vintage Trailer Supply in New Mexico and Out of Doors Mart in NC. I live up on the USA Canada border 500 yards from the Pacific, but I order from these dealers all the time. They are great. They deal in all the Airstream specific parts. If you need appliances etc, your local Craigslist should have decent used stuff.

Feel free to message me if you need specific advise or info. Iíll help you any way I can. Ventura and SB Counties are a second home to me... gotta help out the locals!

Pic of my past Argosy at Hobson:
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	90654B67-252C-4BA6-A2A1-F5814F917FB3.jpg
Views:	7
Size:	184.1 KB
ID:	386883  
redthies is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2021, 08:36 AM   #4
Rivet Master
 
kidjedi's Avatar
 
1972 25' Tradewind
1976 31' Excella 500
1974 31' Excella 500
1975 24' Argosy 24
Denver , Colorado
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 806
In my opinion, the biggest problem with vintage airstreams (and new ones, actually) is the lack of insulation. But you are in California, so that's less of an issue.


I don't see any problem with living in a stock 70's Airstream, as long as most things function and it doesn't leak. I'm in a stock 1975 right now, and I love it. The only major change I made to the interior was pulling out the carpet and laying down floating LVP (which can be easily replaced later).



If you plan on selling it down the road, I would suggest being judicious with the "upgrades" you make. I see a lot of renovations that result in a trailer that needs gutting more than the original. Clunky cabinetry and furniture and appliances that aren't meant for Airstreams detract more from an Airstream's value than "dated" original components. You can save yourself a lot of time and effort by just just doing a thorough cleaning, and you will likely be doing more to retain the resale value by *not* making changes. Plus, like with vintage cars, I think a lot of those original interior components will become more sought after as they become more rare.


Have fun!
__________________
25' 1972 Airstream Trade Wind Land Yacht (heavily customized)
2006 Jeep Liberty CRD (diesel)
BeahmStream.com
kidjedi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2021, 08:48 AM   #5
4 Rivet Member
 
redthies's Avatar
 
Currently Looking...
1974 29' Ambassador
1963 19' Globetrotter
Whiterock , British Columbia
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 276
Smart you are, Jedi.
redthies is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2021, 10:11 AM   #6
4 Rivet Member
 
mikextr's Avatar

 
1967 26' Overlander
Bugtussle , Oklahoma
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 342
Please research purchasing the land and zoning restrictions before you purchase the trailer. Most localities won't allow putting a travel trailer on your land as a residence. Even in the boonies. You might want to consider the tiny house route.
__________________
1967 Overlander International 26ft
2006 Porsche Cayenne Turbo S 520hp 530ft-lbs torque 7700lb towing capacity
mikextr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2021, 10:15 AM   #7
Rivet Master
 
kidjedi's Avatar
 
1972 25' Tradewind
1976 31' Excella 500
1974 31' Excella 500
1975 24' Argosy 24
Denver , Colorado
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 806
Quote:
Originally Posted by redthies View Post
If you are just taking the trailer to your work to rehab it, call a tow truck to move it and save the hassles of lights, brakes etc for the first move.
I've posted this elsewhere, but it bears repeating. AAA plus RV is $195 for the year and they will flat tow your Airstream 100 miles... four times a year! Particulars vary by region, so be sure to call your local agent to verify specifics, but here in Colorado they will tow anything you own, and it doesn't have to be a "break down" like Good Sam and others. $195 is almost certainly less than what you would pay for a single tow, and it comes with a LOT of extra perks. (AAA should be paying me.)
__________________
25' 1972 Airstream Trade Wind Land Yacht (heavily customized)
2006 Jeep Liberty CRD (diesel)
BeahmStream.com
kidjedi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2021, 10:16 AM   #8
Rivet Master
 
1988 25' Excella
1987 32' Excella
Knoxville , Tennessee
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 3,807
Blog Entries: 1
At least do a search for a place to park it before you buy and repair it. You need to know about what it is going to cost you to park it.

I live in 2 different old Airstreams up to 7-8 months a year and could easily do it year around. But...it costs me $3500 a year plus $600 electricity to park one (in a cheap state) and it costs me about $25 a night when we are on the road with the other one.

We like the twin beds.

Check the frame for rust. Particularly up under the battery compartments. I bought an old trailer and ended up having to replace the A frame. Not a happy day.
Bill M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2021, 10:20 AM   #9
1 Rivet Member
 
Ventura , California
Join Date: Jan 2021
Posts: 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by redthies View Post
Hi James. Welcome to Airforums. Iím also a James, and surf at Hobson regularly so I wonít steer you wrong. I should mention I restore/renovate Airstreams for a living.

First things first, there is a TON of great info on here, but to put it mildly, most of the people on here way overthink things (which is good and bad), and a lot of them are coming at things in a different way than you. First off, you donít need to rush out and replace axles. Check/repack wheel bearings, and make sure the tires are safe and hold air. If you are just taking the trailer to your work to rehab it, call a tow truck to move it and save the hassles of lights, brakes etc for the first move. When you have it at your work, start going through things. If there isnít a bunch of leaks and rot or rodent damage, you might get away with a very minimal remodel to make it liveable. Find someone who knows RVs to help you test all the appliances and waterlines etc. If the trailer is in Ventura County, you know it wonít have been frozen before and water lines burst. Go through it, clean it up and test things.

Once you find what it needs, you can get that sorted and then take on the decorating side of things. Inland RV in Corona has lots of parts, as well as Vintage Trailer Supply in New Mexico and Out of Doors Mart in NC. I live up on the USA Canada border 500 yards from the Pacific, but I order from these dealers all the time. They are great. They deal in all the Airstream specific parts. If you need appliances etc, your local Craigslist should have decent used stuff.

Feel free to message me if you need specific advise or info. Iíll help you any way I can. Ventura and SB Counties are a second home to me... gotta help out the locals!

Pic of my past Argosy at Hobson:

Beautiful Argosy! And a great spot for it! Thanks for the encouraging words!

Just to get it to the shop - the tires are all cracked up, so def need replacing. And since the tires are dead, I'd figured I'd need new axles since I know there is some kind of rubber component to them. But maybe they'll be ok since they're out of the sun? Obviously, I'd rather not replace them if it's not necessary. Seems the AS has been sitting for around 10 years. I will look into repacking the bearings - I need to find new bearing seals to do that, correct? And regular red grease. All the window gaskets and other visible rubber is cracked, so I'm not counting on any functional rubber to properly do its job.

One thing I am worried about is the driveway. It is very steep, leading out to a road with a blind curve. When I pull out of the driveway with my Toyota Prius my tail hits the road - I can't imagine how much a 30 foot trailer with the wheels in the center would drag. No idea how they got it up there. Maybe I will have to build a ramp? Or just hire a tow truck to deal with the whole situation? A flatbed? It'll be moving from Ojai area to Oxnard.

James Brehm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2021, 10:21 AM   #10
Rivet Master
 
kidjedi's Avatar
 
1972 25' Tradewind
1976 31' Excella 500
1974 31' Excella 500
1975 24' Argosy 24
Denver , Colorado
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 806
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikextr View Post
Please research purchasing the land and zoning restrictions before you purchase the trailer. Most localities won't allow putting a travel trailer on your land as a residence. Even in the boonies. You might want to consider the tiny house route.

FWIW, I had the privilege of visiting with Frank Lloyd Wright's grandson, Eric, at the home he was building up Malibu Canyon. He and his wife, Mary, were living in an Airstream with a large wooden deck while completing the concrete (and amazing) residence. An Airstream on a bluff in Malibu Canyon was better than most "permanent" homes I've seen anywhere in LA.
__________________
25' 1972 Airstream Trade Wind Land Yacht (heavily customized)
2006 Jeep Liberty CRD (diesel)
BeahmStream.com
kidjedi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2021, 10:31 AM   #11
CC
 
1972 27' Overlander
Heinsburg , AB
Join Date: Jul 2018
Posts: 197
Welcome James. I echo the above advice. No reason why you can't live in a sound airstream (or rv of any kind). I found a 1972 overlander that was very well maintained and sheltered in it's life. I have updated the upholstry, installed luxury vinyl floors and used a lot of white paint. This summer I worked (with a tech) to get the appliances going. These things were made to last! One recomendation I would make is to get a CO dectector. My fridge was leaking carbon monoxide into the cabin.
Good luck with your venture and post some pics, we love to see them.
CC
Camper Crazy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2021, 10:42 AM   #12
1 Rivet Member
 
Ventura , California
Join Date: Jan 2021
Posts: 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by kidjedi View Post
In my opinion, the biggest problem with vintage airstreams (and new ones, actually) is the lack of insulation. But you are in California, so that's less of an issue.


I don't see any problem with living in a stock 70's Airstream, as long as most things function and it doesn't leak. I'm in a stock 1975 right now, and I love it. The only major change I made to the interior was pulling out the carpet and laying down floating LVP (which can be easily replaced later).



If you plan on selling it down the road, I would suggest being judicious with the "upgrades" you make. I see a lot of renovations that result in a trailer that needs gutting more than the original. Clunky cabinetry and furniture and appliances that aren't meant for Airstreams detract more from an Airstream's value than "dated" original components. You can save yourself a lot of time and effort by just just doing a thorough cleaning, and you will likely be doing more to retain the resale value by *not* making changes. Plus, like with vintage cars, I think a lot of those original interior components will become more sought after as they become more rare.


Have fun!

Is the insulation really that bad? It does get chilly here in the central coast, sometimes into the 40s at night. Also, I may want to relocate the the east coast one day (upstate NY, for family reasons) and use it as a guest house. However, if I did plan to sell it before movinf - will painting the walls, cabinets, and fridge white, and reupholstering the cushions lower the resale value?


Quote:
Originally Posted by InsideOut View Post
You can. If itís ďcozy & comfortableĒ enough for you, go for it. The biggest issues you may have if you are "just plopping it on some land" are:

1) where? A lot of areas don't allow this...
2) how are you going to get water to it?
3) how are you going to dump it?
4) what about electric?

Good luck with whatever you decide to do ~

Shari

Every once in a while I see a bit of land for an RV advertised for rent on craigslist - like a spot on somebody's ranch, things like that. I see one right now for around $600. My advantage is that I have a place to store it while I wait for the right one of these opportunities to come along. It seems like water and electric are provided in these situations, though only some of them mention sewer.


Quote:
Originally Posted by mikextr View Post
Please research purchasing the land and zoning restrictions before you purchase the trailer. Most localities won't allow putting a travel trailer on your land as a residence. Even in the boonies. You might want to consider the tiny house route.
(See above). I'd probably be renting the land, as real estate prices around here are through the roof. There are many people living in their RVs all over Ventura County, on the streets, in driveways, in the mountains, it is sort of a thing here. I will look into what the rules actually say about this, but it seems evident that nobody cares.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kidjedi View Post
I've posted this elsewhere, but it bears repeating. AAA plus RV is $195 for the year and they will flat tow your Airstream 100 miles... four times a year! Particulars vary by region, so be sure to call your local agent to verify specifics, but here in Colorado they will tow anything you own, and it doesn't have to be a "break down" like Good Sam and others. $195 is almost certainly less than what you would pay for a single tow, and it comes with a LOT of extra perks. (AAA should be paying me.)
Holy ****, thanks! A flatbed may be necessary for the steep-ass driveway.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill M. View Post
At least do a search for a place to park it before you buy and repair it. You need to know about what it is going to cost you to park it.

I live in 2 different old Airstreams up to 7-8 months a year and could easily do it year around. But...it costs me $3500 a year plus $600 electricity to park one (in a cheap state) and it costs me about $25 a night when we are on the road with the other one.

We like the twin beds.

Check the frame for rust. Particularly up under the battery compartments. I bought an old trailer and ended up having to replace the A frame. Not a happy day.
Thanks for the tip on the rust. We will try the twin beds before tearing them out - but we like to cuddle and stuff.

Since I will have a place to store it indefinitely, I will have time to look for the right place for it. As I said above, I see ads on CL often for RV spots on people's land. Worst case scenario, there is an RV park advertising for $1000 (to much, but still cheaper than out apartment).

Thanks for all of the replies! I'm gonna check it out again soon, this time digging a little deeper, and will take some better pics. Anything else I should be specifically checking for? Maybe I can bring an extension cord and try plugging it in.
James Brehm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2021, 10:43 AM   #13
1 Rivet Member
 
Ventura , California
Join Date: Jan 2021
Posts: 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Camper Crazy View Post
Welcome James. I echo the above advice. No reason why you can't live in a sound airstream (or rv of any kind). I found a 1972 overlander that was very well maintained and sheltered in it's life. I have updated the upholstry, installed luxury vinyl floors and used a lot of white paint. This summer I worked (with a tech) to get the appliances going. These things were made to last! One recomendation I would make is to get a CO dectector. My fridge was leaking carbon monoxide into the cabin.
Good luck with your venture and post some pics, we love to see them.
CC
How did you figure out that it was the fridge? This was one thing I was worried about - goes beyond the comfort factor
James Brehm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2021, 11:19 AM   #14
Rivet Master
 
1960 22' Safari
in the wilderness , The great Mojave Desert
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 4,022
Couple of random thoughts...

Your plan is a good one overall.

Don't paint it. You will lose money on resale.

Only fix what you need to. Don't go rehab crazy. My 1960 Safari is still stock. Works great for all the boon docking and off road camping I do. (I did replace the original orange drapes.) I just repair stuff as needed.

Can you find a lot with water and elec? Remember you will need to dump your black tanks so a place nearby would be handy. Also do a search for "Brown mountain" you will need to know about that.

Gray water. Depending on where you land you can either dump at the station or "water" trees, bushes etc.

Do it! Spend only what you must on repairs and find that place to park it. Save as much money as possible on getting the trailer to its new home and save for that house.

Best to you.
__________________
I'd rather be boon docking in the desert.

WBCCI 3344 FCU
AIR# 13896
CA 4

Yes, we have courtesy parking for you. About an hour North of Los Angeles.
Goin camping is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2021, 11:34 AM   #15
4 Rivet Member
 
1976 31' Excella 500
Chappell Hill , Texas
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 455
Images: 1
My regular response to newbies pondering a direction:

Wait! Clean it up maybe paint a little fix electrical and appliances then go camping; try it out as is for a while. Then you’ll see what you really like or don’t like. Too many people gut them and before you know it they’re trying to keep up with the Jones. Too many abandon the project then due to the enormity of a gut job.
tbashin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2021, 12:35 PM   #16
Rivet Master
 
Halford1's Avatar
 
2019 19' Flying Cloud
Canyon Country , California
Join Date: May 2019
Posts: 823
Why replace Axles? raise up AS and try to turn tires. I would believe that all bearings be replaced. If you plan to travel with AS, maybe you should replace axles, but if you plan to use it as a home, do not worry about the axles. another question: how long as the AS been parked at the home? GY Endurance are good tires to replace the dry rotten tires.
You can either do a full renovation or do one thing at a time if other part of the AS is fine.
__________________
2014 Ford Explorer XLT with factory installed Tow Package.

2019 Flying Cloud 19CBB
Halford1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2021, 01:01 PM   #17
Rivet Master
 
kidjedi's Avatar
 
1972 25' Tradewind
1976 31' Excella 500
1974 31' Excella 500
1975 24' Argosy 24
Denver , Colorado
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 806
Quote:
Originally Posted by Camper Crazy View Post
One recomendation I would make is to get a CO dectector. My fridge was leaking carbon monoxide into the cabin.

And a propane detector! They are well worth the investment.
__________________
25' 1972 Airstream Trade Wind Land Yacht (heavily customized)
2006 Jeep Liberty CRD (diesel)
BeahmStream.com
kidjedi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2021, 01:03 PM   #18
4 Rivet Member
 
redthies's Avatar
 
Currently Looking...
1974 29' Ambassador
1963 19' Globetrotter
Whiterock , British Columbia
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 276
Quote:
Originally Posted by James Brehm View Post
Beautiful Argosy! And a great spot for it! Thanks for the encouraging words!

Just to get it to the shop - the tires are all cracked up, so def need replacing. And since the tires are dead, I'd figured I'd need new axles since I know there is some kind of rubber component to them. But maybe they'll be ok since they're out of the sun? Obviously, I'd rather not replace them if it's not necessary. Seems the AS has been sitting for around 10 years. I will look into repacking the bearings - I need to find new bearing seals to do that, correct? And regular red grease. All the window gaskets and other visible rubber is cracked, so I'm not counting on any functional rubber to properly do its job.

One thing I am worried about is the driveway. It is very steep, leading out to a road with a blind curve. When I pull out of the driveway with my Toyota Prius my tail hits the road - I can't imagine how much a 30 foot trailer with the wheels in the center would drag. No idea how they got it up there. Maybe I will have to build a ramp? Or just hire a tow truck to deal with the whole situation? A flatbed? It'll be moving from Ojai area to Oxnard.

You can buy axle bearing kits from SKF that come complete with all the bearings, seals etc that you will need. Dexter sells complete brake assemblies too that just bolt up if it comes to that. I just brought home a 1963 that I dragged out of the Bush and winched on my trailer. The 25 year old tires held air enough to winch it on the trailer, and are still holding 2 weeks later in my yard. Trailer tires are cheap enough that I would do some new ones if youíre going to tow it on itís own wheels. I wouldnít worry about axles for that trip. At least youíre not taking it too far. If you buy it and start to travel with it, then look at axles.

We hope to be at Hobson or on the Rincon again in May, but the border may not be open in time for our planned trip.

Maybe post a couple of pics of the proposed trailer on here?
redthies is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2021, 01:18 PM   #19
2 Rivet Member
 
1970 29' Ambassador
Euless , Texas
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 38
Clean it up first

I purchased an almost original 1970 Ambassador that I could have slept in the first night but my wi9fe would have none of that. By getting after the cleaning first you will learn a lot about where you want to spend first. If not leaking then leave it alone why reseal the outside. Earlier posts to your questions have provided great info for you. If I was going to buy your trailer when you get ready to sell it I can tell you the more original it is the more I would be willing to pay.
tx70amb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2021, 01:32 PM   #20
Rivet Master
 
kidjedi's Avatar
 
1972 25' Tradewind
1976 31' Excella 500
1974 31' Excella 500
1975 24' Argosy 24
Denver , Colorado
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 806
Quote:
Originally Posted by James Brehm View Post
Is the insulation really that bad?
Yes. That said... I am talking about Colorado. But I have been in my stock Argosy all this winter, and though it's not as good for winter as the trailers I've re-insulated, it's not the end of the world, and the propane furnace and/or an electric space heater have kept me perfectly comfortable.

Quote:
Originally Posted by James Brehm View Post
It does get chilly here in the central coast, sometimes into the 40s at night.
40's. That's adorable.

Quote:
Originally Posted by James Brehm View Post
Also, I may want to relocate the the east coast one day (upstate NY, for family reasons) and use it as a guest house. However, if I did plan to sell it before movinf - will painting the walls, cabinets, and fridge white, and reupholstering the cushions lower the resale value?
Don't paint the fridge. The front panel is easily replaceable, so just do that. Lots of people paint, but again... lots of people do a bad job. The most important thing is prepping the surface before painting, i.e. getting it squeaky clean. I would say don't paint the cabinets, but obviously it's up to you. You might consider some kind of wall paper or contact paper instead, as it might be easier to remove at sale time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by James Brehm View Post
though only some of them mention sewer.
Check out composting toilets. It sounds gross, but once you use one, you'll be surprised by how not gross it is (way less gross than emptying a black tank). Plus, you don't have to drive anywhere to dump your black tank. Setting up your composting toilet so that the urine diverter is plumbed directly to the gray tank so you don't have to dump a urine tank is key for convenience.

Quote:
Originally Posted by James Brehm View Post
We will try the twin beds before tearing them out - but we like to cuddle and stuff.
A platform to join the twins is your best bet (we call it a "hanky-planky"). Having the extra "walking room" when the bed is not in use is a great convenience.
__________________
25' 1972 Airstream Trade Wind Land Yacht (heavily customized)
2006 Jeep Liberty CRD (diesel)
BeahmStream.com
kidjedi is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Are rockguards really necessary? KYAirstream Rock Guards, Segment & Window Protectors 30 10-02-2014 10:51 AM
LEDs for a total rehab GeocamperAS Lights - Interior & Exterior 4 11-11-2010 08:00 PM
Is the battery really necessary? flynaxos Batteries, Univolts, Converters & Inverters 7 11-24-2009 03:32 PM
Is the water pressure regulator really necessary? page.crow Water Heaters, Filters & Pumps 17 05-02-2009 04:18 PM
Really, Really, Really Hot swebster Airstream Motorhome Forums 8 11-16-2003 09:46 PM


Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Disclaimer:

This website is not affiliated with or endorsed by the Airstream, Inc. or any of its affiliates. Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:42 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.