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Old 01-25-2018, 10:31 PM   #141
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Time for a minor update, although it reflects days of planning and work. I have most of the new framing pieces cut for rebuilding the bath cabinet. I am making some modifications to make it stronger and slightly increase the sizes of the internal storage compartments.

To date, I've only removed the interior shelf that was delaminated and mostly detached. I've decided to not disassemble the framing to be replaced (most of the framing that is not part of the face frame) until I have the new pieces ready to install. In any case, I have most of the new framing pieces cut to length with pocket holes for screws drilled. I have to say that using my new Kreg pocket hole jig is a breeze and the screws should make it much more sturdy than the original staples.

In the attached photo, the new framing is mocked up with clamps, or just laying/leaning in approximately in place (some may eventually be moved slightly before I finally screw it all together.)
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Old 01-27-2018, 09:25 PM   #142
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Today I completed making and installing the new framing for the bath cabinet. It is much more sturdy with the pocket screws and relocated and added bracing. I still have to add the mid level shelf, but will wait to do that until I strip the front and repaint part of the interior that was previously painted. Those tasks will be easier without the shelf in place.
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Old 01-28-2018, 05:21 AM   #143
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Looks lightweight and strong. Good job.
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Old 01-28-2018, 06:17 PM   #144
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Not related, but I was pleasantly surprised that my 75 Overlander cabinet framing is all extruded aluminum. Strong and light, no rot. Our 86 is the same way. My old 66 Trade Wind and my son's 69 Globetrotter have cabinets framed in wood. I don't know what year Airstream switched to aluminum extrusions. I doubt that was a cost reduction effort.

Your around the world Safari is wood of course, and you are recreating "how it was" but likely better.

David
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Old 01-28-2018, 11:11 PM   #145
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Not related, but I was pleasantly surprised that my 75 Overlander cabinet framing is all extruded aluminum. Strong and light, no rot. Our 86 is the same way. My old 66 Trade Wind and my son's 69 Globetrotter have cabinets framed in wood. I don't know what year Airstream switched to aluminum extrusions. I doubt that was a cost reduction effort.

Your around the world Safari is wood of course, and you are recreating "how it was" but likely better.

David
Airstream started using "perma-tech" extruded aluminum framing for cabinets for the 1971 model year, a concept they said was inspired by the airline industry. They claimed it was stronger, yet lighter.
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Old 01-28-2018, 11:16 PM   #146
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Today I made a trip to where the trailer is stored to test fit the bath cabinet in case adjustments were needed, since I mage some internal framing changes from original. It fit fine - photo attached. The black tank and cover are just set in place to test their fit as well. They are not ready to be permanently installed yet.

I then brought the cabinet back home and later in the day I stripped the front, but that is not worth posting a photo.
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Old 01-29-2018, 06:08 AM   #147
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Gray Water?

Joe,
I know that your objective is to bring her back to the way she was, ...... but I was just wondering if you are considering adding a gray water tank, and if so, what are your thoughts in case I missed it earlier in your thread.
Thanks,
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Old 01-29-2018, 03:55 PM   #148
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Thank you Joe for the bit of Airstream history. I wondered when they started with the aluminum extrusions. Now I know.

Bath cabinet looks really fine.

David
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Old 01-29-2018, 11:22 PM   #149
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Joe,
I know that your objective is to bring her back to the way she was, ...... but I was just wondering if you are considering adding a gray water tank, and if so, what are your thoughts in case I missed it earlier in your thread.
Thanks,
StevieB
Hi Stevie,
I actually provided that answer way back in post #90 where I indicated that I had a custom gray water tank made to fit one 4" high frame bay without hanging down below the belly pan, which limits it to about 12.5 gallons because of space taken up by the in-floor furnace duct, maybe 13+ gallons including the below floor piping. This should get us the ability to boondock for a couple of days in a pinch without pulling out an external "blue boy" tank. The only external indication the gray tank is there with be a second dump handle. I have test fit, but not permanently installed the tank yet. No need to do so until I am ready to connect the piping.

This gets me to my restoration philosophy for this trailer. The goal is to make it look like it just got home from the 1963-64 Around the World Caravan, but with below the skin improvements where appropriate for safety or convenience. We want the trailer to be usable and comfortable, but visually correct. This means modern furnace, water heater, water tank, water pump, electrical wiring and circuit breakers, led light bulbs, etc. hidden inside original cabinets and lamp housings and behind the original period correct external covers. Visible appliances such as the stove and fridge will be reused and/or rebuilt with modern guts if necessary since they cannot be replaced without it being obvious. I chose not to put an air conditioner on the roof because it did not have one during the ATWC, but will plan on getting a portable floor sanding unit to use if/when necessary.
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Old 01-29-2018, 11:28 PM   #150
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Since I am up writing, I have one more thought to post. I am beginning to think that it might just be better to make a new bath counter top with new laminate, rather than attempting to remove and reuse the original Formica that is complete, but wavy, stained, and somewhat scratched.

A recent trip to a couple of stores yielded counter top samples that show both Formica and Wilson Art laminates that are almost a perfect color match for the original counter tops in Cramer. In both brands, the Almond color was the best match.
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Old 01-30-2018, 05:06 AM   #151
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Wilson Art

Joe,
We used Wilson Art Formica in the 54 Safari, 63 Bambi and the 66 Avion, and additionally in one of the bathrooms in our house. Period correct with many designs to choose from. Highly Recommend.
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Old 02-18-2018, 09:03 PM   #152
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A couple of weeks with no posts does not mean no progress. I've just mostly been repairing veneer, stripping old varnish and applying new polyurethane to various interior wood items. That is a time consuming task that is no where near done yet, but I make progress every day. Generally it is not worth posting photos though. I have also spent some time planning and purchasing new copper pipe and fittings to redo the bath cabinet plumbing, but have not actually started to rebuild the plumbing yet.

I'll just post one photo of progress today, a test fit of the bath cabinet counter top. The cabinet base in the photos has three new coats of polyurethane, as does the mid level interior shelf. I spent a few hours today fine tuning the counter top fit to the rear wall below the rear window and especially to the curved wall in the corner. It now fits great, so I can cut the sink and toilet sprayer openings next and glue on the edge extender that will provide backing for the new Formica, which has been ordered and is scheduled to arrive tomorrow.
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Old 02-19-2018, 06:38 PM   #153
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That bath vanity looks great. Fits perfectly. There is just a ton of work to make look that good. Winter is the best time to do the cabinetry in a warm place.

I was wondering why two apparent vent lines from the above floor black tank?

David
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Old 02-20-2018, 12:04 AM   #154
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I was wondering why two apparent vent lines from the above floor black tank?

David
One vent line is from the black tank, the other is effectively a gray water vent for the tub and bath sink. That vent line runs along side the black tank just above the floor, but under the black tank cover originating from under the bath cabinet.

I will eventually end up splicing a third vent into the same pipe going thru the roof for the gray tank I am adding.
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Old 02-20-2018, 06:40 PM   #155
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I see. Thanks for the explanation.

My Overlander has three vents penetrating the roof. More rainwater leak sources. I am unsure what the plumbing code is for venting a drain line. I have spliced together the new gray water tank vent with the original black water tank vent in the same vertical pipe through the roof. That's why mankind invented ABS tees. The galley sink has its own vent through the roof, and the bath shower drain line has its own vent through the roof. No gurgling drains in the Overlander for sure.

David
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Old 02-22-2018, 12:54 AM   #156
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Quick update. I continue to strip items like roof lockers and cabinet doors as time allows. Not worth photos. I need to let things dry for at least a couple of days before starting to polyurethane those items, since I am using a water based stripper and then lots of water to remove the stripper residue. The wood definitely soaks up some water in the stripping process and then needs significant drying time. I am also trying to build up a batch of items to get ready for polyurethane so that I can work that process like an assembly line.

I did test fit the bath sink and faucet into the new bath counter top today. The new laminate has arrived and I have purchased a trim router and contact cement, so as soon as I practice applying laminate (which I've never done before) on some scraps, I can glue the laminate to the counter top.
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Old 02-22-2018, 07:28 AM   #157
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Quick update. I continue to strip items like roof lockers and cabinet doors as time allows. Not worth photos. I need to let things dry for at least a couple of days before starting to polyurethane those items, since I am using a water based stripper and then lots of water to remove the stripper residue. The wood definitely soaks up some water in the stripping process and then needs significant drying time. I am also trying to build up a batch of items to get ready for polyurethane so that I can work that process like an assembly line.

I did test fit the bath sink and faucet into the new bath counter top today. The new laminate has arrived and I have purchased a trim router and contact cement, so as soon as I practice applying laminate (which I've never done before) on some scraps, I can glue the laminate to the counter top.
Joe, as far as your laminate installation, just another skill you can add to your portfolio. Usually, I will cut the big sheet down to a manageable size using the flush trim bit. You have to be careful and not let the router take off on you when youíre free handing. You will find that the rotation of the bit cuts smoother in one direction versus the other. I think I trim pulling the router. Anyway, you will feel the difference. Apply the contact cement and let mostly dry, lay your spacer sticks down (wooden yardsticks work well), lay the sheet on top of the spacers, pull one spacer out at a time and lay the laminate, and roll the laminate once itís down. Trim the edge with the flush trim bit and file the edges. For the sink cut out, I usually mark about where the sink cutout is located and drill a hole large enough for the flush bit before I laminate the top. Reason being, I drill through the laminate with a piece of wood under it so I donít split the laminate. Iím sure you know most of this, but just thought I would throw it out there. I think itís fun. Good luck, Bubba
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Old 03-03-2018, 10:53 PM   #158
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No updates for a few days as I've been head down, nose to the grindstone, working away. I did glue the Formica to the bath cabinet top, trimmed it to size and cut the openings with my new favorite power tool, a trim router. Attached is a photo with the sink test fit in the now top.

Then I made the two new aluminum wall pieces for the interior compartments in the bath cabinet, since I tweaked the interior sizes slightly from original.

Then I stopped on working on the bath cabinet, so that I could concentrate on veneer repair and stripping all of the remaining interior wood items in my basement (drawer fronts, cabinet and closet doors, roof lockers, and floor cabinets). All the veneer repair on these items is complete was of this afternoon, and stripping should be done within a couple of days. The biggest challenge was the top of what I call the credenza - the cabinet that housed drawers and a lower bin that is under the curb side window, opposite the bed. The top was severely water damaged due to window leaks during and after there was a window air conditioner installed above it, as result of the cut window frame and compromised window gasket. I had assumed I would have top replace the credenza top, but after practicing repairing other pieces of veneer, I found that I was able to carefully able to straighten the top with a mist of water and clamping and then re-glue the heavily warped and cracked veneer. It is not perfect, but it will remain original. It should look pretty good after a few coats of polyurethane.

My next goal is to get all of these items polyurethaned, so that they are ready to be reinstalled when the weather gets a little warmer. The I can move on to finishing the water heater and furnace installs, plumbing, propane lines, electrical, etc. Still a lot to do.

This wood refinishing activity in my basement excludes four large items, including the two closets and the kitchen cabinet that are stored in my garage because they were too awkward to carry down into my basement when removed from the trailer, although the drawers and cabinet/closet doors for these pieces are in my basement getting refinished. Those big items will get repaired and refinished in my garage when it gets a little warmer. The 4th item is the front roof locker that I will have to repair/refinish in the trailer since I could not figure out how to remove it from the front fiberglass end cap.

At this point, I should make some additional commentary about wood glue choices. I have experimented the following 4 different types of wood glue in the following order of use:
  • Elmer's Wood Glue Max (waterproof)
  • Titebond Genuine Hide Glue
  • Titebond II Extend Wood Glue (water resistant and longer working time)
  • Titebond III Ultimate Wood Glue (waterproof)
My current recommendation it to use Titebond III Ultimate Wood Glue. It has a much longer working time that Elmer's, and flows easier, so it works better in the West Marine syringes than Elmer's. I've only had a single clog with it and that was on a reused syringe vs. many clogs with Elmer's. I have let a syringe full of Titebond III sit for a half hour or more and it still flowed when I got to my next gluing activity. It cleans out of the syringes easily with water. Titebond II Extend takes way too long to set up. Had I tried Titebond III first, I would have realized I had no need to try Titebond II Extend. Titebond Hide Glue works well, but can be dissolved by water, even after it is fully set, so that does not seem optimal for repairing water damage. Titebond III is the best I have tried. I guess time will tell which holds up better over the long term. I won't know that answer for years.
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Old 03-04-2018, 06:54 PM   #159
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You are sure getting very good at restoring old water damaged plywood. The bath vanity looks great. Thanks for the summary on wood glues. I've used the Ultimate for a couple of years just because it says Ultimate. But I know nothing about restoring delaminated plywood with it.

I bet you are taking this trailer to the international rally this summer. The folks there would love to see it, done or not.

David
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Old 03-17-2018, 11:12 PM   #160
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My work has been steady, but not much to post about. A couple of days after my last post, I did complete the stripping of all the wood items in my basement.

It then took me about a week (between other commitments) to do some veneer repair that I previously missed before stripping as well as detail sand every item in preparation for applying 3 or more coats of polyurethane. The drawers were the worst. Each of the 14 drawers probably took an hour to an hour and a half (based upon size) to sand, because I sanded every interior and exterior surface due to either mouse residue or mold/mildew. My intent is to polyurethane all interior and exterior sides of the drawers to make them fresh. Interiors may get painted in some cases if they already were painted, or to hide mouse stains I could not get out.

I am now in the midst of applying the polyurethane, currently to 14 items, mostly cabinet doors and roof lockers in the current batch, about half of the remaining items in my basement waiting to be poly'd. But when you realize that most items need to be finished on at least 2 sides, and each surface gets at least 3 coats (occasionally more), with at least 2 hours drying time and another light sanding between coats, and other commitments, it is slow going. I am dreading getting to the drawers in the next batch. I still hope to have everything in my basement polyurethaned by the end of March, but will lose a few work days late this month due to other commitments. I hope I am ready to move on to the items in my garage (if the weather cooperates) in early April.

In case I haven't mentioned it, I am using Deft Water Based Interior/Exterior Polyurethane. It seems to go on pretty easily with a foam brush, and the brushes are easily cleaned with water so they can be reused. It is very runny, though, so I am trying to only apply it to horizontal surfaces, which means repositioning items that have multiple sides so that the work surface is always on top. The finished items do look great, though, in my amateur opinion.

Since people like photos, a couple of photos are attached of some items post prep sanding and some cabinet doors getting polyurethaned.
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