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Old 09-22-2020, 09:39 AM   #21
Iron tepee #35
 
1993 34' Excella
andalusia , Illinois
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Originally Posted by Al and Missy View Post
Even if the trailer is perfect, it is referenced to ground at the facility entrance panel. Ground potential at the trailer could be different and it could be enough to feel a shock. One cause could be a leak in the park power system. In cases such as these one could disconnect the trailer and measure between the ground pin on the pedestal and earth ground and see a voltage.
That is not correct. In a properly wired system, with no faults, you should NEVER receive a shock from the grounding conductor. All currents should be on the positive and grounded conductors.
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Old 09-22-2020, 11:11 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by mikeoxlong View Post
That is not correct. In a properly wired system, with no faults, you should NEVER receive a shock from the grounding conductor. All currents should be on the positive and grounded conductors.

Perhaps you didn't understand my point. Regardless of the trailer, the potential of the ground in the vicinity of the trailer can be different from the potential of the ground at the facility meter. Earth ground has resistance. Hypothetically, if I were to take a hot wire (which is referenced to ground at the facility meter) and stick it in the earth at the trailer location, current would flow from the wire to somewhere else. The potential at the wire would be very close to 120 volts referenced to the ground at the meter. If you then took a wire (emulating the green wire ground) and measured the potential between the earth near the hot wire and the green wire you would read nearly 120 volts. Electrical systems leak for many reasons. The trailer next door could be putting current into the ground as could a miswired pedestal, or defective insulation on a feeder cable.



OP should check his trailer, but in the absence of a trailer fault it is still possible to get shocked when touching the trailer and earth ground.
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Old 09-22-2020, 11:42 AM   #23
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Originally Posted by Betterboat View Post
. . .
Thanks to anyone who can offer help on these two issues since I’m not an electrician
Betterboat
Are you [the OP] monitoring this thread?



I hope that the wide range of advice here is . . .

Clear as mud . . .

. . . because you may have a . . .

Quote:
Originally Posted by OTRA15 View Post
Dangerous situation!

This is above my pay grade, but you should immediately unplug the trailer from shore power, and do not plug it back in until a licensed electrician has found the source of you being shocked.
. . .
Good advice here IMO:

Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnTF View Post
If you have to ask this question .
Then you do not know enough to do any work on any electrical .
You need to find someone qualified in both low voltage & household AC electrical .
Happy and safe trails,
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Old 09-22-2020, 04:08 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by daleyocum View Post
It doesn’t work that way. The DC reading could be all over the place if you stuck it on an AC line. Try not to do that! On some meters you’ll damage them putting that much voltage on a meter expecting DC. On a modern autoranging meter it might not hurt anything but the reading you get will be meaningless.

Typically, as was said, an AC line will be inside a heavy sheath of some sort.
I have a very old Micronta (Radio Shack) VOM. I know in the past I have accidentally left it on DC volt when reading AC. It didn't hurt the meter but if you looked closely you could see the needle vibrating while sitting around 60 volts. Switch to AC and it jumps to 120. It still works fine but I prefer the freebie HFT VOM for most of my readings now. No worries about what scale you're on.
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Old 09-23-2020, 12:00 PM   #25
Iron tepee #35
 
1993 34' Excella
andalusia , Illinois
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First, this thread was from a real person with a potentially life threatening electrical problem. It’s not helpful to make it overly complicated. If your point is that electrical systems at some campgrounds are poorly designed, built and maintained, I agree.
If you wish to have a discussion about parallel grounds, that’s an interesting topic. However I will remind you that generated electricity doesn’t seek earth, it seeks a return to its source. Lightning seeks earth. A ground rod’s most important function is to provide a path to efficiently shunt a lightning strike to earth.
Now if you grabbed the “hot” wire at your camper and managed to touch the ground rod at the service you would most definitely get nailed. The ground rod is bonded to the neutral at the service and you would be completing the path for current to return to its source. But generally speaking, if you measured resistance between your camper and the ground rod you would find it to be in the meggaohm range. Meaning that you could hold the “hot” wire in one hand, stick your finger in the dirt and receive no shock at all.

QUOTE=Al and Missy;2413386]Perhaps you didn't understand my point. Regardless of the trailer, the potential of the ground in the vicinity of the trailer can be different from the potential of the ground at the facility meter. Earth ground has resistance. Hypothetically, if I were to take a hot wire (which is referenced to ground at the facility meter) and stick it in the earth at the trailer location, current would flow from the wire to somewhere else. The potential at the wire would be very close to 120 volts referenced to the ground at the meter. If you then took a wire (emulating the green wire ground) and measured the potential between the earth near the hot wire and the green wire you would read nearly 120 volts. Electrical systems leak for many reasons. The trailer next door could be putting current into the ground as could a miswired pedestal, or defective insulation on a feeder cable.



OP should check his trailer, but in the absence of a trailer fault it is still possible to get shocked when touching the trailer and earth ground.[/QUOTE]
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Old 09-28-2020, 12:17 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by Betterboat View Post
. . .
A second question is while camping last weekend in the rain in the upstate I noticed getting shocked when entering the trailer and grabbing a hold of the handle door (:is there a grounding problem ? I’ve never had that experience before . The ground was wet and I was standing outside in the rain Entering the trailer
Thanks to anyone who can offer help on these two issues since I’m not an electrician
Betterboat
Did you get this possibly dangerous situation repaired?

Thanks,
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