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Old 04-24-2016, 01:33 AM   #21
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Since we are the heavy side of the GVW sticker when "everything" is loaded in the truck (including the kitchen sink...) we will plan to replace the tires this summer due to age and not mileage. The truck was built in June of 2012 and sat out on the dealership lot in Indianapolis until we acquired it in January 2013. We have stored it in an air conditioned garage in Phoenix when not in use.

I consider a tow vehicle front tire failure when towing likely to create a laundry generating experience moment. Since we plan on mountain driving, there is additional impetus to be safe rather than sorry.

For our vintage Ram 2500HD Cummins, the same axle is used for the one ton model with an additional leaf spring to gain 500 pounds of payload (GVW becomes 10,100 pounds). The same tires would also work.

Thus, the air bag conversion has more capacity than an additional steel spring, but the real limitations are the tires and axle ratings which were not increased by the airbags.

We cross the CAT scales on nearly every departure to be sure the numbers are still good for both vehicles. Also, adjusting the ProPride does impact the load transfer to the front axle which in our case is 300 pounds lighter than when unattached at 4,580 pounds on a 5,500 pound rated axle.
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Old 04-24-2016, 09:46 AM   #22
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While I was shopping for my 2015 Ram PU, the Ram salesman told me that the only difference between the 2500 & the 3500 was that the 2500 had coil springs, and thus a smaller payload, while the 3500 had leaf springs, & thus a larger payload --- other than that, the trucks were identical. He said the major reason to buy a 3500 was if the truck was to be used hauling a heavy camper. And yes, the difference in price between the two (identical in every other way) was only around $500.
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Old 04-24-2016, 01:11 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dkottum View Post
That would mean if we loaded our truck evenly, using a scale to ensure, it is fine to exceed GVWR as long as we don't exceed GAWR or tire load rating.. Which is what many of us believe.
I wouldn't stress too much about being slightly over the GVWR, particularly if driving a short distance with extra care, but it is there for a reason. It is a legally defined maximum. It is only 'fine' from the perspective of axle weight ratings, not from the perspective of vehicle weight ratings. In your part of the world, it may not be enforced for non-commercial vehicles. In my part of the world, for RVs, exceeding the GVWR is either a citation (for newer vehicles) or a written order for older vehicles (you have to rectify it within a certain time frame, or take the vehicle off the road). Extreme cases result in roadside bans. Enforcement is triggered by a law enforcement officer noticing an obviously overweight vehicle, but it is also a factor in liability following a crash, as published by our provincial government vehicle insurance agency. If you are an out of province vehicle involved in a crash with a vehicle registered in BC, they are the ones deciding who to sue for damages.

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Originally Posted by dkottum View Post
It should also be noted we could overload an axle GAWR without exceeding GVWR.
Absolutely true. Which is why there are three legally enforceable weight limits (GVWR, GAWR, tire ratings). This is contrasted with towing limits that are not defined in the same way, unless we are talking commercial vehicles and GCVWR.

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Old 04-24-2016, 02:15 PM   #24
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Jeff, there may always be some law enforcement jurisdiction where we can somehow be in violation of something. I know of none in the U.S. where your example applies to recreational towing, it applies to commercial towing. That's why we have weigh stations for commercial vehicles, not for recreational vehicles. I can't speak for Canada, you can.

"Enforcement is triggered by a law enforcement officer noticing an obviously overweight vehicle, . . . "

This is a sensible statement from nearly anyone's point of view, and when someone appears obviously overweight they are probably way over what the rig is capable of. Few of any of us if any routinely fall into that category.
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Old 04-24-2016, 02:26 PM   #25
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Why the big payload difference between 3/4 & 1 ton

Michelin, again, switz?

Mine lasted five years and a few months in South Texas. About 70k and xtra low wear (about 4-5 32s).

I'll go four to five. No longer am going to rely on miles or tread wear.

As to difference in one ton versus, ld choose the more co
Pliant suspension. Especially with independent front suspension.

Too much worry about "weight" around here instead of steering braking. Both far more important.
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Old 04-24-2016, 02:35 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by dkottum View Post
Jeff, there may always be some law enforcement jurisdiction where we can somehow be in violation of something. I know of none in the U.S. where your example applies to recreational towing, it applies to commercial towing.
Fair comment, I don't know your regulations. But as a clarification, I am not referring to towing, I am referring to the load carried by the tow vehicle. I agree that there won't be any enforcement around tow ratings. It is just a caution that people should understand that the GVWR is an actual defined and regulated thing. Possibly not enforced, depending on jurisdiction, but still real.

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Old 04-24-2016, 02:47 PM   #27
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Not GVWR, but tire and axle ratings.
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Old 04-24-2016, 04:09 PM   #28
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Not GVWR, but tire and axle ratings.
That appears to be dependent on jurisdiction.

Here in BC, the rule is enforced by the Commercial Vehicle Safety Enforcement Branch of the provincial Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure, and applies to privately owned RVs:

Quote:
Motor Vehicle Act Regulations in British Columbia prohibit the operation of vehicles that are unsafe or improperly loaded and exceed either the Gross Axle Rating (GAWR) or the Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR). The Province is focusing on vehicles that are obviously overweight and pose a risk to the safety of other motorists. These regulations apply to vehicles manufactured after January 1, 2001 that have a GVWR of 5500 kg or less.
They publish what their 'visual cues' are for spot checks, and it includes the front axle being higher than the rear axle. RVs are not required to stop at commercial weigh stations, but spot checks are done with portable scales, and a police officer has the power to direct a private vehicle to the scales.

Also interesting is that the CVSE list their services as including post collision weighing of vehicles for police crash investigations.

http://www.cvse.ca/vehicle_inspections/PDF/MV3230.pdf

http://www.cvse.ca/references_public...82003)GVWR.pdf

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Old 04-25-2016, 03:31 AM   #29
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Yes, our 2012 Ram 2500HD Cummins came with Michelin LT265/70R17E tires. Saved me having to stop and get these after driving off the dealer's lot.

These tires will be at least four years old in June. (Currently in the UK so can not read the date codes). Truck has about 32,000 miles. So time is the criteria. I know the truck sat outside on the dealer lot through the summer and into the winter when I bought it. So starting with a new set this year, I will know the complete actual tire history going forward.

I have to contend with the mountains when leaving our home location. Good tires are a necessity. If I lived in Kansas (would's largest aircraft carrier being basically flat) and never went in the mountains, one could consider running tires for a longer period of time.
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Old 04-25-2016, 08:37 AM   #30
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The most elementary thing that enters my mind is this:
A 1/2 ton pickup is basically designed to haul (at least in the old days, hence the designation) 1,000 lbs.
A 3/4 ton pickup is basically designed to haul 1,500 lbs.
It seems like maybe the 1/2 tons of today are designed to haul 1,000 lbs. over and above the weight of passengers and fuel- at least some of them.
What is the real difference?
Springs usually-
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