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Old 09-24-2020, 07:12 AM   #61
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Originally Posted by Ranger Doug View Post
I towed a 3300# custom built (1948) trailer with a 2007 Toyota FJ but the rear-end went kaput--they were built in Mexico and Toyota had a bad bunch of these. I rebuilt it for $2000 (Toyota chipped in half), sold the FJ and bought the 2015 Sequoia which tows it easily.
The FJ Cruiser was built in Japan. The Tacoma is built in Mexico.
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Old 09-24-2020, 07:31 AM   #62
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Originally Posted by richw46 View Post
The FJ Cruiser was built in Japan.

I think he was referring to the differential being built in Mexico.
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Old 09-24-2020, 07:53 AM   #63
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Originally Posted by brokeboater View Post
I think he was referring to the differential being built in Mexico.
Well, I don't have any information on that. It would seem strange to build the rear end in Mexico and then ship them to Japan for completion, but they have done that with other parts. (They build Camry in the US and ship them to Japan even though they can make the Camry in Japan.)

Maybe the same rear end is used in the Tacoma and FJ cruiser. They both have the locking differential but the FJ's platform was the same as the 4runner and I think they both had the same available 6 cylinder. (4Runner offered a V8 from 2003 to 2009, not available in the FJ.)
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Old 09-24-2020, 07:55 AM   #64
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thrice View Post
We tow our 2020 25FB Flying Cloud (Petunia) with a 2020 Toyota Tundra SR5 4x2 CrewMax (Growly Pete) and an Equalizer hitch.
I'm open to other mods as well. Curious about shocks... tires... etc. We have 18" OEM tires. Michelin LTX P255/70R18
I added Bilstein 5100 shocks a few years ago. It leveled the truck. I also just have the base model Tundra, so the Bilsteins were a definite upgrade.

I’m also adding this:
https://www.etrailer.com/Vehicle-Sus...RAS4611TD.html

I still have a small amount of sag with my 2012 Tundra and our 25FB. This should eliminate it. Also going to 10 ply tires. I’ve only got 110,000 miles on the Tundra, so it’s going to remain my TV for a very long time.
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Old 09-24-2020, 10:39 AM   #65
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In regards to modifications, the single modification I enjoy the most is an auxiliary fuel tank to augment the factory tank capacity. Factory is 24.6 gallons + another 12.5 gallon aux tank, or about 37 gallons total. For my model, there's also 24, and 40 gallon subtank options though one has to balance fuel weight considerations.

I believe the Tundra is the only model from the factory with an expanded 38 gallon option.

If anyone else is interested, look into Long Range Fuel Tanks - Cruiser Brothers. Many Toyota applications supported. These are imported from a long time builder of gas tanks in Australia for use in the rugged Outback.
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Old 09-25-2020, 04:47 AM   #66
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Per Ptek above: “ I believe the Tundra is the only model from the factory with an expanded 38 gallon option.”

My 2020 Tundra has the 38 gallon tank. Of course, the larger tank reduces payload (120 lbs combined weight of the larger tank and the additional 12 gallons per Owners Manual). Nevertheless, with the AS in tow, the range on my 2014 was about 220 miles. Now I should be able to do 340-ish depending on terrain and speed.
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Old 09-25-2020, 10:23 AM   #67
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Towing a 2006 28' Safari with my 2010 Sequoia Platinum. The 5.7L is a great gasser engine; we frequently camp in Kananaskis on the Eastern slopes of the Rockies with elevations above 4200'; engine pulls very well. Brakes are also very fine with our 6000 - 7000 lb trailer; especially with the MaxBrake controller. Only real complaint is the small fuel tank (the marginal payload hasn't been an issue, especially with wifey and I not having to drag along the kids anymore). Don't have a picture of the rig, sorry.
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Old 09-25-2020, 03:24 PM   #68
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GettinAway View Post
I added Bilstein 5100 shocks a few years ago. It leveled the truck. I also just have the base model Tundra, so the Bilsteins were a definite upgrade.

Iím also adding this:
https://www.etrailer.com/Vehicle-Sus...RAS4611TD.html

I still have a small amount of sag with my 2012 Tundra and our 25FB. This should eliminate it. Also going to 10 ply tires. Iíve only got 110,000 miles on the Tundra, so itís going to remain my TV for a very long time.

Thanks! I am intrigued and I'm wondering what are the "problems" these types of things solve? I ask as I am new to this sort of thing. I'd like to be safe, but I don't want to just buy upgrade parts if the OEM parts are brand spanking new and fine.



While I feel pretty good about my Tundra and it's towing capabilities, I do hear of Bilsteins shocks (I'm assuming these are just better than the OEM shocks) and air bags...etc.


What issues do these products solve for you?


I will note that when we get on uneven highway there's a lot of bump with the trailer... it subsides fairly quickly, but it can get a little bouncy. That's the only issue I've encountered, but nothing that causes me any great concern... or should it?
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Old 09-26-2020, 01:50 AM   #69
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GammaDog View Post
Per Ptek above: ď I believe the Tundra is the only model from the factory with an expanded 38 gallon option.Ē

My 2020 Tundra has the 38 gallon tank. Of course, the larger tank reduces payload (120 lbs combined weight of the larger tank and the additional 12 gallons per Owners Manual). Nevertheless, with the AS in tow, the range on my 2014 was about 220 miles. Now I should be able to do 340-ish depending on terrain and speed.
I have the 2014 Tundra with the 26 gallon tank. I carry two 5 gallon cans of NON ALCOHOL regular gas ratcheted to the front wall of the 6.5 foot bed. These cans cost $30 each and extend my capacity to 36 gallons with the added benefit of being extra fuel for my Honda 2000 generators if I need it. I have not needed it in four years and over 30,000 miles.Of course I do have to plan for the extra fuel stops, but at 70 I find that the need for pit stops and stretch breaks is a little greater than when I was in my 20's doing 17-22 hours straight with the wife. The gas cans also are a LOT cheaper than the cost of the optional 38 gallon tank, and can be removed easily for weight savings around town and for larger payloads. I was a bit envious of the bigger tank originally, but if I had it to over with the optional tank available, I would not get it... at least not at the price the local dealers wanted for it.

I plan my trips with gas stops specifically identified by station. With today's internet it is not hard to do, and with gasbuddy.com I can find not only the stations with name brand accuracy, but also the best price.

The payload is reduced a little less but it can be removed if desired... so I am still very happy with my truck which I use almost exclusively for towing a 22 foot 2004 Airstream. The truck probably doesn't even notice the load.
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Old 09-26-2020, 07:36 AM   #70
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Toyota T100, Sequoia, and Tundra

2005 Toyota Tundra SR5 Double Cab 4.7LV8 and 1977 Airstream Safari 23í

Truck has 150,000km
34,000km towing the airstream

I love this generation Tundra, plenty of power for the smaller trailers and spittle smaller truck to park and maneuver.
Also the roll down back window is great for backing up and hooking up trailers.

My twin brother bought this truck brand new in 2005 and Iíve been itís caretaker since his death in 2006.

I also use it to tow the racecar trailers.

Itís had exhaust, brakes tires, one timing belt and one battery.

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Old 09-26-2020, 10:58 AM   #71
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thrice View Post
While I feel pretty good about my Tundra and it's towing capabilities, I do hear of Bilsteins shocks (I'm assuming these are just better than the OEM shocks) and air bags...etc.


What issues do these products solve for you?


I will note that when we get on uneven highway there's a lot of bump with the trailer... it subsides fairly quickly, but it can get a little bouncy. That's the only issue I've encountered, but nothing that causes me any great concern... or should it?
As an avid suspension junky, I can try to answer this for you.

Suspension is primarily dictated by two factors. Spring rate and damping. In plain english without getting too technical. Spring rate helps better support more weight. Damping helps control and absorb motions.

Airbags augment spring rate.
Bilstein increase damping.

Both incredibly useful to handling heavier loads. Often the increased payload package of most manufacturers differ only in the suspension installed. Like an F250 to F350, differs largely by the addition of another spring to increase payload (as everything else, structure, engine, brakes, etc. is largely already up to task).

The caveat of increasing these is that ride quality may suffer when unladen. So manufacturers always balance ride quality to payload capacity. Airbags are great as they are adjustable so there's less of a tradeoff.

One can improve payload handling performance by modifying their suspension with those tools to increase stability. From a technical standpoint, it would also be true that it could potentially increase payload handling beyond manufacturing specs. Though this doesn't solve the legalities of it.
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Old 09-26-2020, 11:08 AM   #72
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Silver.Sanctuary View Post
I have the 2014 Tundra with the 26 gallon tank. I carry two 5 gallon cans of NON ALCOHOL regular gas ratcheted to the front wall of the 6.5 foot bed. These cans cost $30 each and extend my capacity to 36 gallons with the added benefit of being extra fuel for my Honda 2000 generators if I need it. I have not needed it in four years and over 30,000 miles.Of course I do have to plan for the extra fuel stops, but at 70 I find that the need for pit stops and stretch breaks is a little greater than when I was in my 20's doing 17-22 hours straight with the wife. The gas cans also are a LOT cheaper than the cost of the optional 38 gallon tank, and can be removed easily for weight savings around town and for larger payloads. I was a bit envious of the bigger tank originally, but if I had it to over with the optional tank available, I would not get it... at least not at the price the local dealers wanted for it.

I plan my trips with gas stops specifically identified by station. With today's internet it is not hard to do, and with gasbuddy.com I can find not only the stations with name brand accuracy, but also the best price.

The payload is reduced a little less but it can be removed if desired... so I am still very happy with my truck which I use almost exclusively for towing a 22 foot 2004 Airstream. The truck probably doesn't even notice the load.
I agree with many of your points and it's a fair perspective.

If I may offer a different perspective as I've towed thousands of miles with my stock sized tank, then with the addition of a auxiliary tank (which to your point is not a cheap endeavor).

This may also matter more for those towing larger Airstreams as it eats more into MPGs decreasing range.

I find that with the addition of an expanded fuel tank, that our travels are more relaxed. Prior, we would focus just about every stop on fuel. Every bio stop, food stop, start or end of day, included considerations for gas. On heavy tow days, with headwinds, and desolate locations and needing to keep more margin (though your fuel can solves this), I've had to get gas upwards of 4 times.

With the additional tank capacity, we now focus more on stopping at interesting places for things like lunch or stretch breaks. It's made the journey more relaxed and satisfying as fuel stations can be a choir rather than a choice.

I do still carry a 3.5 gallon fuel can on my roof rack. For the genny like you, but good backup for myself or others.

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Old 09-28-2020, 01:59 AM   #73
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pteck View Post
As an avid suspension junky, I can try to answer this for you.

Suspension is primarily dictated by two factors. Spring rate and damping. In plain english without getting too technical. Spring rate helps better support more weight. Damping helps control and absorb motions.

Airbags augment spring rate.
Bilstein increase damping.

Both incredibly useful to handling heavier loads. Often the increased payload package of most manufacturers differ only in the suspension installed. Like an F250 to F350, differs largely by the addition of another spring to increase payload (as everything else, structure, engine, brakes, etc. is largely already up to task).

The caveat of increasing these is that ride quality may suffer when unladen. So manufacturers always balance ride quality to payload capacity. Airbags are great as they are adjustable so there's less of a tradeoff.

One can improve payload handling performance by modifying their suspension with those tools to increase stability. From a technical standpoint, it would also be true that it could potentially increase payload handling beyond manufacturing specs. Though this doesn't solve the legalities of it.

Just a brief comment re the above.

If in any way increasing the tow vehicle's rear spring rate be aware that this will move the roll couple rearwards and thus increasing any tendency to oversteer.

No issue in increasing that spring rate - but you really do need to do likewise for the front springs (or add a sway bar that will have the same effect of restoring the roll couple's orignal location).

Collyn
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Old 09-28-2020, 09:41 AM   #74
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Just a brief comment re the above.

If in any way increasing the tow vehicle's rear spring rate be aware that this will move the roll couple rearwards and thus increasing any tendency to oversteer.

No issue in increasing that spring rate - but you really do need to do likewise for the front springs (or add a sway bar that will have the same effect of restoring the roll couple's orignal location).

Collyn
That's too blanket of a statement and in many cases, not likely. For the distribution of load that a vehicle sees from unladen to laden, roll couples are just not that significant compared to so many other variables including weight biases, tire pressure, WD adjustments, type of WD, suspension attitude, etc. Roll couples are just an afterthought for most trucks, and most every one is biased greatly towards understeer from the factory. The benefits to stability with just increased rear spring rate will have a bigger positive impact to handling than tailoring for roll couple.

Race cars, that's a different story. We would have a great conversation there.
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Old 09-28-2020, 04:46 PM   #75
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Originally Posted by pteck View Post
That's too blanket of a statement and in many cases, not likely. For the distribution of load that a vehicle sees from unladen to laden, roll couples are just not that significant compared to so many other variables including weight biases, tire pressure, WD adjustments, type of WD, suspension attitude, etc. Roll couples are just an afterthought for most trucks, and most every one is biased greatly towards understeer from the factory. The benefits to stability with just increased rear spring rate will have a bigger positive impact to handling than tailoring for roll couple.

Race cars, that's a different story. We would have a great conversation there.
I can assure you, as an ex-GM (UK) research engineer that 'roll couples' are far from an afterthought.

Your comment 'The benefits to stability with just increased rear spring rate will have a bigger positive impact to handling than tailoring for roll couple' appears to (misleadingly) suggest that increasing rear spring rate does not affect front/rear roll couple distribution seems to indicate that you do not understand the dynamics involved.

Increasing the rear spring rate [I]causes /I] the roll couple to move rearward.

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Old 09-28-2020, 06:55 PM   #76
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I recently read that the new generation Tundra may come with coil springs replacing the leaf springs. I hope this is not the case.

Personally, I much prefer leaf springs in the rear.
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Old 09-28-2020, 06:55 PM   #77
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I can assure you, as an ex-GM (UK) research engineer that 'roll couples' are far from an afterthought.

Your comment 'The benefits to stability with just increased rear spring rate will have a bigger positive impact to handling than tailoring for roll couple' appears to (misleadingly) suggest that increasing rear spring rate does not affect front/rear roll couple distribution seems to indicate that you do not understand the dynamics involved.

Increasing the rear spring rate [I]causes /I] the roll couple to move rearward.

Collyn
Don't worry, it's not lost on me. I'm very much aware of the dynamics at play. Afterthought may be too strong of a statement. At the same time, you may be stroking fear of increasing spring rate disproportionately which is my point. There's solid benefits to be had to increasing rear spring rate for a heavier load. Within reason, and without the need to deal with the roll couple impacts of the front axle, that would produce an overall safer and better handling rig.

I get the conservative recommendations as this is a public forum and most wouldn't have much insight into the dynamics involved. As an engineer, my recommendation stands.
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Old 09-30-2020, 12:19 AM   #78
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Don't worry, it's not lost on me. I'm very much aware of the dynamics at play. Afterthought may be too strong of a statement. At the same time, you may be stroking fear of increasing spring rate disproportionately which is my point. There's solid benefits to be had to increasing rear spring rate for a heavier load. Within reason, and without the need to deal with the roll couple impacts of the front axle, that would produce an overall safer and better handling rig.

I get the conservative recommendations as this is a public forum and most wouldn't have much insight into the dynamics involved. As an engineer, my recommendation stands.
It is hard to know (particularly as I am in Australia) what the average interested reader on this forum knows and does not know about the dynamics of towing via an overhung hitch.

The I am getting is that many members are pushing their luck by towing too fast and often by too little.

On the plus side (I have visited the USA over 20 times) is that American drivers are mostly more disciplined than Australians - who likewise tow too fast and pull too much with too little.

Just listened to the Trump/Biden debate. Mmmmm....

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Old 10-04-2020, 03:54 PM   #79
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Thanks Everyone!!!

Thanks to everyone for the posts, information, and stories. It seems like the post has quieted down.

I put together all the Tow Vehicles and Trailers and Hitches that people shared (and the ones I know of personally) into a spreadsheet (attached). Great seeing all the Tundras, FJs, 4Runners, and Lexus'. Hope you all enjoy it. (If anyone wants missing dates added, send me a message and I will update)

I have been towing Horse Trailers for over 2 decades with a 1996 5 speed manual Toyota T100 SR5. Gooseneck.
One is a 3 horse slant Featherlight (pictured). The other is a 6 horse steel stock trailer. I have also towed a Mac-Lander flat bed trailer hauling baby Tonka trucks, including a 10,000lb bull dozer. The T100 did great. Well, perhaps "great" is overstating. But, it was what we had and it continues to work hard for us.

After growing up with a 27 foot Airstream we are looking for the first Airstream of our own. Thinking a 25 foot FB Twin. Planning to upgrade likely to a Sequoia or a Tundra. But, if I needed, I was wondering how capable the T100 might be. Gooseneck is way different than bumper pull.

The information you all provided was very interesting. It was really fun to post this thread and read.

Thanks again!
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Old 10-05-2020, 08:07 AM   #80
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Interesting to see them all listed at once. Maybe it is “ok” to pull a 25’ AS with a Toyota.
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