Free 7 Day Trial RV GPS App RV Trip Planner Campground Reviews RV Maintenance Free 7 Day Trial ×
 


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 04-06-2017, 11:23 AM   #81
Rivet Master
 
Mountain View , California
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 573
Quote:
Originally Posted by mojoe7009 View Post
It's simple. Attorneys can and will sue anyone involved in a case. Ford was absolved because they clearly show the towing capabilities of their trucks in writing in multiple places with all the proper disclaimers. Our salesman, on the other hand, clearly knew the weight and dimensions of the trailer to be pulled. He also "recommended" the particular truck the customer purchased, which was not adequate based on Ford's ratings. The customer relied on that recommendation to make the purchase. As I said, our insurance company settled with the customer. It did not go to court. We may have ultimately prevailed in court but the cost to do so may have exceeded the cost of the settlement. That was their call.
I do not think it is that simple. Anybody can sue. Collect may few.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mojoe7009 View Post

My point was not our liability, if any, it was using an underrated vehicle to pull any trailer can be dangerous and have catastrophic results.
While many have towed with the different vehicles mentioned in this thread "with no problem" that does not preclude that it will not happen to someone else or them in future. I have had homeowners insurance for 40 years but my house has never burned down or flooded. Do I still need insurance just because nothing has ever happened?
Totally agree. Therefore, people show use their brains, do their homework and not relay on what salesmen are saying or what the TV towing specs are. I am still a newbie, but I know that towing is like science. Of course, you can take the easy way and just tow with oversized truck. Driving a truck is not an option for me for many reasons. Fortunately, there are also other ways, one just need to understand how things are working.
bono is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2017, 11:29 AM   #82
jcl
Rivet Master
 
Currently Looking...
Vancouver , British Columbia
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 2,950
Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveSueMac View Post
JCL - I'm unclear on how that works. Let's use my truck - it's got a hitch receiver with a 1500# TW capacity. Not being an engineer - I assume that rating comes from the receiver itself as well as its connection to the frame and the frame's ability to handle the dead weight and pressure from actual towing. If I put a receiver rated for 5000# TW on the truck, how do I know the truck components to which the new receiver is attached can handle those increases? Thanks!
The hitch rating comes from the receiver itself, the connection to the frame, the vehicles's ability to handle the weight, and the cost of the receiver when the manufacturing team spec'd that specific hitch.

Your towing decisions should be guided by the hitch capacity, the vehicle capacity, the axle capacity, the tire capacity, and so on. All of them have relevance, you can't just pick one.

In this case, the LandRover vehicle (and I don't know which specific model it is, so the poster should check) appears to have a tow rating of 7700 lbs, but has a smaller, lighter, and thus cheaper hitch originally installed by the factory. Cost reduction is a big thing for automotive manufacturers, especially ones in Europe who will never see a tongue weight over the 550 lb spec. Simple response is to install a stronger hitch. You still have to worry about the other numbers, but they appear to have headroom in this case. There are higher rated hitches available, that still allow the owner to respect axle weights, tire loads, and so on.

If you want to buy a stronger receiver for your own truck, check and see what is available. If a reputable supplier offers a hitch with a few more pounds of weight capacity, decide if you need it. I have a hard time imagining that a reputable supplier would offer a hitch with a 5000 lb tongue weight for your truck, and that if they did you would still be within axle load limits, but I don't know what specific truck you have.

This is essentially an argument from absurdity, taking it to an extreme.

What if your exact same truck had a hitch installed with a 550 lb weight limit, because the original purchaser only planned to use it with a bike rack? The manufacturer would still provide the same towing limit as you have, but you would be capped by a 550 lb tongue weight. Would you feel comfortable installing a hitch with a 1500 lb tongue weight limit, from a reputable supplier, if you were still able to stay within axle ratings (to use that example)? If not, why not?

Jeff
jcl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2017, 11:32 AM   #83
3 Rivet Member
 
2014 22' FB Sport
2017 28' Flying Cloud
Southwest Ranches , Florida
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 170
Had this case gone in front of a jury I can almost guaranty that you would have lost. Once the jurors get a look at the quadriplegic logic goes out the window and emotion takes over. They will look for someone to compensate the victim whether it's the victim's fault or not.
Mergatroyd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2017, 11:38 AM   #84
4 Rivet Member
 
mojoe7009's Avatar
 
Currently Looking...
Green Cove Springs , Florida
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 479
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mergatroyd View Post
Had this case gone in front of a jury I can almost guaranty that you would have lost. Once the jurors get a look at the quadriplegic logic goes out the window and emotion takes over. They will look for someone to compensate the victim whether it's the victim's fault or not.


I agree. I was only trying to add some real world experience with an underrated tow vehicle. Even we try to modify them to make work better the liability is still there if modified beyond manufacturer approved standards.
So, ultimately, to each his own. Tow what you want with what you want...I'm all good. I'm out.
__________________
Breathe In, Breathe Out, Move On
mojoe7009 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2017, 11:49 AM   #85
jcl
Rivet Master
 
Currently Looking...
Vancouver , British Columbia
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 2,950
Quote:
Originally Posted by rostam View Post
Exactly. Hitch receivers are chosen in accordance with other components of a vehicle. You may be able to put an aftermarket hitch receiver that has a slightly higher rating (say 20% more than the OEM) without affecting the chassis, suspension, vehicle stability and handling, etc. But (and this is an extreme case) you cannot just put a class IV receiver on a Miata and say it can now tow 15,000# because the receiver is rated as such.
I don't see the logic in focusing on a single limit, but rather want to consider the vehicle and trailer as a system. That produces a result that will be much safer for all.

Arguing about towing a 15,000 lb trailer with a Miata is absurd, and adds nothing to the discussion, IMO. How would you meet published TV axle weight limits?

Now, if the limit is tongue weight, and there are stronger hitches commercially available, with appropriate ratings (for tongue weight) and at the same time the vehicle in question is rated to tow the trailer under discussion, and can do so while respecting axle weight limits, tire weight limits, etc, then what is the problem exactly?

Consider the parallels presented by changing another component that the OE manufacturer supplied, but which was no doubt selected partly for cost reasons. Upgrade the TV tires, for example. Make sure they are capable of carrying the weight required, that they have the appropriate speed rating, etc. Select a reputable supplier. I don't see the problem, even though I am using a component that the OE manufacturer didn't select. Some may say I am loading the suspension beyond what it is designed for, by using a softer compound with more grip, as an example. But I think I will be OK, based on experience. Do I open myself to a lawsuit because I have non-stock tires, if they are in fact rated and selected for the application? I think not.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rostam View Post
These figures are exact and are calculated to the single digit. For example, Mercedes Benz GLS 550 has a receiver rating of 600#. Mercedes Benz GLS 63 (the AMG version with sport suspension) has only a receiver rating of 309#. Clearly, the limitation here is not the receiver or the chassis or the connection between them, but more likely the the suspension and tires.
I haven't looked at that vehicle, so can't comment specifically. But I would see if the receiver is the same (BMW varies them due to exhaust system interference on some high performance models), the tires are the same, the axle load ratings are the same, etc. Something is different. It isn't hard to figure out what. Run the vehicle part books for specific serial numbers to see what changed. It may be possible to tow more with the AMG, or it may not

Quote:
Originally Posted by rostam View Post
JCL is vastly experienced with autos (much more so than me). It puzzles me why he insists on something thats clearly not correct.
I don't like the spreading of FUD (Fear, Uncertainty, Doubt) as I think it does a disservice to the community. Different opinions are fine, and welcome. Falsehoods and illogical arguments should be challenged. IMO.

Jeff
jcl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2017, 11:59 AM   #86
jcl
Rivet Master
 
Currently Looking...
Vancouver , British Columbia
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 2,950
Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveSueMac View Post
Rostam - just to be clear, I'm not making a point in my post, I'm asking a question based on a non-existent engineering background on my part. I shared some assumptions but I have no idea if those are accurate understandings or not. In your example, the Miata isn't designed for towing to begin with - and while I like the extreme example to make a point, I'm trying to understand in a more real example (maybe my 1500-5000# TW example is too extreme as well, now that I think of it).

Maybe we just stick with the Range Rover and the 550# TW limit set by the mfg. If we could take my 1500# receiver off my truck and bolt it to the RR, would that act alone enable the RR to handle up to 1500# TW? If so, why? If not, why not? What considerations are there for this kind of thing?

Apologies for the lack of clarity - I'm really just trying to understand the concept (ref. my comments about the "camp" I'm in...). Thanks!
Yes, the Miata example is extreme, as is your 5000 lb tongue weight. In my previous response I suggested that you consider if you bought your truck with a lighter hitch (used) and wanted to install a 1500 lb hitch.

Your receiver isn't designed to attach to the Range Rover. My dad used to be provided with company cars (new Ford wagon every 3-4 months) and we changed a lot of hitches, complicated only when it was a jump from a Torino to an LTD, or a new chassis. But they had a certain similarity. You can't compare your truck and the RR. You could if your truck and the RR had a similar payload capacity.

Considerations for the hitch include strength, mounting locations available, interface to the vehicle, and so on. That is about the hitch. Now come to the vehicle. Consider where the weight is applied (how much rear overhang), what the TV axle ratings are, etc. It is of no value to consider a single item in isolation. It is a system.

If you want to install a 1500 lb hitch on a RR, as an example, do a free body diagram and figure out what the axle loads will be on the TV, and what the forces would be on the receiver. Just kidding. Given that the payload of the RR is not that high, we can probably skip the calculations and suggest it isn't feasible.

But if you want to load the RR up to the published load ratings, and your stock hitch isn't sufficient, then go to a hitch supplier and see what they have.

Jeff
jcl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2017, 12:08 PM   #87
jcl
Rivet Master
 
Currently Looking...
Vancouver , British Columbia
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 2,950
Quote:
Originally Posted by rostam View Post
Understood.

Here is what my research indicates: I do not know of a single unibody vehicle (by any manufacturer whether domestic, European, or Asian) that has a receiver rating of 800# (or more). If these vehicles could handle more, I'm sure some manufacturer would take advantage of that. My understanding is that unibody vehicles cannot handle the forces applied by higher rated receivers (in conjunction with WDH use). The issue seems to be both chassis strength and hitch unibody connection. Also, the independent suspension on unibody vehicles cannot handle the load that solid axle does. IMO, these numbers are not pulled out of a hat and are not intentionally lowered (auto makers want to make money not lose it). The fact that Mercedes says the hitch can carry 309# (and not 310 or 300) shows there is some calculation (or simulation) done to get to this number.
You are referring to stock OE hitches. I don't know of one either. But there are alternatives, while still respecting axle ratings.

Unibody vehicles are generally stronger. That is basic engineering. They are just not as simple to bolt a hitch to, unless the vehicle was designed for it up front. That is basic mechanics.

Independent suspension as applied to these vehicles is not necessarily designed to carry the same high loads as a cart axle with leaf springs. But it handles better, and avoiding an accident is safer than planning for impact absorbing components. Respect published axle ratings. Then this is a moot point.

I worked extensively with heavy mining equipment. The 400 ton capacity ore truck I sold had independent front suspension, and only six tires. Independent suspension can carry loads if designed for them.

309 lbs has a simple answer. it is 140 kg. Exactly. The rest of the world doesn't use lbs.

Jeff
jcl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2017, 12:33 PM   #88
Rivet Master
 
Mountain View , California
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 573
This 309 lbs for AMG version may be applicable for European hitch.

BMW X5 (E70) Euro hitch is rated to 7,700 lbs and 330 lbs tongue weight. US hitch is rated to 6,000 lbs and 600 lbs tongue weight.
bono is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2017, 12:49 PM   #89
jcl
Rivet Master
 
Currently Looking...
Vancouver , British Columbia
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 2,950
I understand this is a Range Rover thread, so apologies for the slight diversion. It is about a Euro SUV and tow ratings, so may have some applicability.

The reduced tongue weight spec for the AMG model is interesting. The hitch appears to be the same in the owner's manual, but this would be the first thing to check, as they may be using the Euro detachable hitch to clear the exhaust system on the higher hp AMG model.

The AMG model is rated to tow over 7000 lbs, so it isn't a powertrain issue.

The AMG model actually has a higher rear axle load rating, by 100 kg, so it doesn't appear to be that (different air suspension, etc).

There is an interesting note in the vehicle loading section in the manual that states that published rear axle loads may be exceeded when trailer towing, as long as towing speed is limited to 60 mph. Haven't seen that often. May not apply to all models. It does consider the trade offs between vehicle speed and vehicle loading.

One thing to check may be the OE spare tire. The AMG model is unique in using a collapsible (deflated) spare tire, that can only be used on the rear axle. It is a limited speed/limited load tire. It can't be used on the front axle; if you get a flat on the front you swap a rear to the front, and put the special spare on the rear.

Or, this may all be related to AMG being the final assembler, and thus manufacturer of record, and the specs coming from them instead of MB. For the non-AMG models, all the figures are in even lbs (with kg conversions). For the AMG models, the figures are in even kg (with lb conversions). Suggests a different source.

Regardless, neat vehicle, and the manual has a lot of info about towing.

Jeff
jcl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2017, 01:21 PM   #90
Rivet Master
 
Vintage Kin Owner
N/A , N/A
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 989
Images: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcl View Post
I don't see the logic in focusing on a single limit, but rather want to consider the vehicle and trailer as a system. That produces a result that will be much safer for all.

Arguing about towing a 15,000 lb trailer with a Miata is absurd, and adds nothing to the discussion, IMO. How would you meet published TV axle weight limits?

Now, if the limit is tongue weight, and there are stronger hitches commercially available, with appropriate ratings (for tongue weight) and at the same time the vehicle in question is rated to tow the trailer under discussion, and can do so while respecting axle weight limits, tire weight limits, etc, then what is the problem exactly?

Consider the parallels presented by changing another component that the OE manufacturer supplied, but which was no doubt selected partly for cost reasons. Upgrade the TV tires, for example. Make sure they are capable of carrying the weight required, that they have the appropriate speed rating, etc. Select a reputable supplier. I don't see the problem, even though I am using a component that the OE manufacturer didn't select. Some may say I am loading the suspension beyond what it is designed for, by using a softer compound with more grip, as an example. But I think I will be OK, based on experience. Do I open myself to a lawsuit because I have non-stock tires, if they are in fact rated and selected for the application? I think not.



I haven't looked at that vehicle, so can't comment specifically. But I would see if the receiver is the same (BMW varies them due to exhaust system interference on some high performance models), the tires are the same, the axle load ratings are the same, etc. Something is different. It isn't hard to figure out what. Run the vehicle part books for specific serial numbers to see what changed. It may be possible to tow more with the AMG, or it may not



I don't like the spreading of FUD (Fear, Uncertainty, Doubt) as I think it does a disservice to the community. Different opinions are fine, and welcome. Falsehoods and illogical arguments should be challenged. IMO.

Jeff
Your argument is based on the assumption that doubling the load at the rear of a Land Rover (from 550# to 1000# for a 28 ft Airstream) has no adverse effect on its handling (specially in an emergency situation), its suspension or chassis. IMO, thats a big assumption.
rostam is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2017, 01:43 PM   #91
jcl
Rivet Master
 
Currently Looking...
Vancouver , British Columbia
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 2,950
Quote:
Originally Posted by rostam View Post
Your argument is based on the assumption that doubling the load at the rear of a Land Rover (from 550# to 1000# for a 28 ft Airstream) has no adverse effect on its handling (specially in an emergency situation), its suspension or chassis. IMO, thats a big assumption.
My argument is based on respecting the vehicle load limits as published by the manufacturer, just not the low tongue weight limit created by the manufacturer's specification of a smaller lighter hitch, and likely a detachable design that can't handle WD equipment and thus restore all or a portion of front axle loads. And I am not selectively ignoring that tongue weight rating, I am demounting the hitch and replacing it with a more suitable design for the intended load.

As long as I can stay within the published load limits for the vehicle, I will always take 1000 lbs applied between the TV axles (virtual projection, resulting from the correct application of a WD hitch and suitable receiver) over 550 lbs hung out behind the rear bumper as envisioned by the TV manufacturer. I will take that in an emergency situation, or a regular everyday situation. It will be safer, as long as it is set up properly. It isn't correct to focus just on the numerical value of the load, and not how it is applied, where it is applied, and what else is done.

Of course there will be an impact on handling compared to the unladen vehicle. But I interpret that you aren't comparing this hypothetical to that, but rather the 550 lb tongue weight without WD.

Jeff
jcl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2017, 02:06 PM   #92
Rivet Master
 
Vintage Kin Owner
N/A , N/A
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 989
Images: 1
I guess you are making even more assumptions than I initially thought. Anyway, not surprisingly, this discussion is not going anywhere, and its better to stop it.
rostam is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-06-2017, 02:27 PM   #93
jcl
Rivet Master
 
Currently Looking...
Vancouver , British Columbia
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 2,950
It is definitely better to stop the FUD. That was the whole point of the responses.

If the assumptions, calculations, engineering principles, etc, aren't clear, just ask.

Jeff
jcl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2017, 05:55 AM   #94
Rivet Master
 
chaseav's Avatar
 
2015 25' FB International
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 573
There's just one thing I'd like to make clear that I HOPE everyone takes away from this thread. Any talk of upgrading hitches, reinforcing this or that, "beefing up" a suspension, is completely and totally irrelevant to the discussion at hand. You don't have to be an engineer to understand this: all weight limits, GVWR, towing capacity, tongue weight are numbers that are fixed and cannot be changed by any aftermarket modification. These numbers need to be thought of as the manufacturers maximum representation of capability of they are exceeded, you open yourself up to legal and civil liability. It is no different that saying "I can have three beers and drive just fine." You probably can and probably have! It just puts you over the legal limit. Hurt someone and you're going to get crucified and rightfully so.
chaseav is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2017, 07:28 AM   #95
4 Rivet Member
 
Currently Looking...
sequim , Washington
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 301
rover engineered this vehicle to be able to carry you and your companions safely through pretty much any terrain. they did not engineer this vehicle to tow 7-10k of dead weight. rover will not say it is ok to exceed their engineered specifications as they would be complicit in any liability claim, that simple. if you choose to exceed their specifications, I can assume your insurance company would also quickly run from any claims coming from an accident.

best to use your vehicle for the purpose(s) it was designed for and get yourself a tow vehicle meant for the job, there are plenty of great easy riding choices out there.
reelfastgreg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2017, 10:03 AM   #96
jcl
Rivet Master
 
Currently Looking...
Vancouver , British Columbia
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 2,950
Quote:
Originally Posted by gpt View Post
rover engineered this vehicle to be able to carry you and your companions safely through pretty much any terrain. they did not engineer this vehicle to tow 7-10k of dead weight. rover will not say it is ok to exceed their engineered specifications as they would be complicit in any liability claim, that simple. if you choose to exceed their specifications, I can assume your insurance company would also quickly run from any claims coming from an accident.
Actually, it depends on the model, but for most Range Rover models they did engineer the vehicle to tow over 7000 lbs (7700 IRC). Check the published manufacturer's numbers.

Don't use the stock hitch for tongue weights over 550 lbs. Reinforce it, or use one rated for a higher tongue weight. Don't exceed axle ratings. It isn't complicated.
jcl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2017, 10:07 AM   #97
jcl
Rivet Master
 
Currently Looking...
Vancouver , British Columbia
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 2,950
Quote:
Originally Posted by chaseav View Post
There's just one thing I'd like to make clear that I HOPE everyone takes away from this thread. Any talk of upgrading hitches, reinforcing this or that, "beefing up" a suspension, is completely and totally irrelevant to the discussion at hand. You don't have to be an engineer to understand this: all weight limits, GVWR, towing capacity, tongue weight are numbers that are fixed and cannot be changed by any aftermarket modification. These numbers need to be thought of as the manufacturers maximum representation of capability of they are exceeded, you open yourself up to legal and civil liability. It is no different that saying "I can have three beers and drive just fine." You probably can and probably have! It just puts you over the legal limit. Hurt someone and you're going to get crucified and rightfully so.
If you want to add clarity, great. Let's stay with what is being proposed in this thread. No need to reinforce or beef up a suspension. No need exceed axle loads or GVWR or towing capacity. The vehicle is fine. Use an appropriate hitch. That's it.

If you put 800 lbs on a hitch designed for 550 you may create liability. If you use a hitch rated for 800 lbs, hard to see the problem here.

If you equate properly equipping a vehicle and operating it legally (per motor vehicle and other laws and regulations) with driving while drunk (which is illegal, apart from being a really stupid thing to do) then you have a problem IMO. They aren't comparable situations.
jcl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2017, 10:27 AM   #98
4 Rivet Member
 
NWRVR's Avatar
 
2015 30' Classic
Sherwood , Oregon
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 479
Blog Entries: 2
When I was towing with my 2008 Range Rover HSE I was happy with the 7,700# hitch capacity but concerned and confused with the 550# tongue weight. It would be understandable if the manual did not clearly state these limits because the Westfalia OEM hitch itself is only labeled 7,700# which by safe towing set up would also be rated for 12% tongue weight or 924#. The problem I had was the Rover manual states 7,700# maximum trailer weight but only 550# tongue weight which implies they are advocating an unsafe towing set up.
__________________
2015 Classic 30A, Blue OX Sway Pro, 2016 F350 4x4 Ultimate Lariat crew cab SRW, LWB, 6.7 PSD, 20" wheels, Ingot Silver Metallic, DiamondBack tonneau cover, TrailFX wheel-to-wheel step bars.
Sold: 2014 25FB International Serenity
NWRVR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2017, 10:40 AM   #99
Rivet Master
 
SteveSueMac's Avatar

 
2012 27' Flying Cloud
W , New England
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 7,400
Quote:
Originally Posted by gpt View Post
. if you choose to exceed their specifications, I can assume your insurance company would also quickly run from any claims coming from an accident.



.


Hi there - I'm not an engineer so I'm still confused on JCL's thoughts on upgrading a receiver - more on that later, but your assumption here about insurance is incorrect (I'm in that field...).

Most likely, your insurer would pay the claim to the limits of the policy and attempt to settle before - or defend you in - a liability suit. If it goes to trial (almost assuredly civil, not criminal), whether or not you prevail is a question of the jury's view on things. If traumatic injuries or death are part of the equation, most likely you will pay far more than any coverage you have.

From there, most likely, your insurer will drop you from coverage (or put your rates through the roof) and the odds of you getting affordable coverage after that become slim.
SteveSueMac is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2017, 10:47 AM   #100
Rivet Master
 
SteveSueMac's Avatar

 
2012 27' Flying Cloud
W , New England
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 7,400
Towing with Range Rover

Quote:
Originally Posted by jcl View Post



If you put 800 lbs on a hitch designed for 550 you may create liability. If you use a hitch rated for 800 lbs, hard to see the problem here.




I think my understanding of your point is that if all other weights check out (axles, CGVWR, tires, towing capacity, payload, etc.) and the only change you're making is to swap out the TV hitch receiver for one with higher capacity, you think that's fine.

Am I understanding your point correctly?

If so - that helps explain it (in terms of not overloading the vehicle) but still leaves a question I just don't understand. Why would the mfg put a 550# receiver on a vehicle that could take 800# in the first place? They'd sell more vehicles (in theory anyway) if they started there since all 550# TW buyers would automatically be included in their market AND those with 551# to 800#.

Is there anything in the connection of the receiver to the frame that limits the TW capacity beyond the receiver itself?

Thanks - not trying to be obtuse - it just comes naturally with engineering stuff....
SteveSueMac is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Towing with a Range Rover Sport philian Towing, Tow Vehicles & Hitches 22 02-24-2015 08:35 PM
towing an Airstream with 2008 Range Rover Sport allen galkin Tow Vehicles 17 06-20-2014 07:26 PM
Towing with a Range Rover Jr1974 Tow Vehicles 26 08-26-2013 09:28 PM
Towing with 2006 Range Rover ghaag Tow Vehicles 15 06-30-2010 01:46 PM
towing with a 94 range rover maryszka Tow Vehicles 3 02-17-2004 06:36 PM


Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Disclaimer:

This website is not affiliated with or endorsed by the Airstream, Inc. or any of its affiliates. Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:33 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.