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Old 02-05-2020, 09:42 PM   #81
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Originally Posted by SSquared View Post
MapQuest web site listed the Cheyenne Nissan dealer as a charging location. Hallady on Westland Rd.
When I looked at Halladay's inventory they had neither new nor used Leafs. That was one clue that led me to believe they didn't have a charging station. ChargePoint.com doesn't list my local Nissan dealer, but I KNOW for a fact they have charging stations. I checked on PlugShare.com and you're right that Halladay in Cheyenne has a charging station.

I wonder why ChargePoint doesn't list the Nissan dealers.
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Old 02-05-2020, 11:11 PM   #82
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When I looked at Halladay's inventory they had neither new nor used Leafs. That was one clue that led me to believe they didn't have a charging station. ChargePoint.com doesn't list my local Nissan dealer, but I KNOW for a fact they have charging stations. I checked on PlugShare.com and you're right that Halladay in Cheyenne has a charging station.

I wonder why ChargePoint doesn't list the Nissan dealers.
You should use Plugshare.com to search for chargers. They're a much better resource.
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Old 02-05-2020, 11:44 PM   #83
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I don't like being told that it "doesn't work" or that I can only go campground to campground or on trips under 200 miles, etc. because I experience the reality of towing with an EV and I know these are misconceptions.
In an earlier post I referenced how it might be relatively easy to get from RV park to RV park towing with an EV. (Maybe that's what you are referring to with your comment). I assumed one could recharge when electrical hookups are present, even in the absence of an actual charging station, but I figured there would be problems if electricity was unavailable at your destination.

So could you clear up my misconception? As someone who tows and is also interested in EV's (I've owned 2) what do you do when you want to boondock somewhere? The no-hookup forest service campgrounds and National forest venues that we like to frequent are often significant distances from built up areas, much less charging stations. Also, it's not just towing the trailer someplace but also having enough range to use the vehicle once you get there. If you don't simply avoid these kind of locations what do you do to make sure you have enough charge available in remote areas?
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Old 02-06-2020, 08:20 AM   #84
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Electric power for towing is tempting but it may be more expensive than we think and may not save much on travel costs while towing
https://nypost.com/2019/01/22/tesla-...electric-cars/

https://electrek.co/2020/01/13/tesla...arger-billing/
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Old 02-06-2020, 05:11 PM   #85
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The thing about infrastructure reminds me of something my brother told me. He said that one of the major problems he faces--and he lives in one of the top 10 metro areas in the US--is that when he arrives at a charging station when he's away from home, they are often broken or no longer in service or simply don't deliver power. Or that people use the slots as parking spaces. Or that there are vehicles already there charging and, as he says, How long am I supposed to wait?
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Old 02-06-2020, 05:20 PM   #86
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Belbein, with the ChargePoint app I can see how many of the ChargePoint charging stations are in use or available. Users can also leave feedback indicating if stations are broken or unreliable.

Ohmman, I started with the PlugShare app three years ago but for some reason discontinued using it. I even removed the app from my phone. I'll have to give it another try.
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Old 02-06-2020, 11:15 PM   #87
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So could you clear up my misconception? As someone who tows and is also interested in EV's (I've owned 2) what do you do when you want to boondock somewhere? The no-hookup forest service campgrounds and National forest venues that we like to frequent are often significant distances from built up areas, much less charging stations. Also, it's not just towing the trailer someplace but also having enough range to use the vehicle once you get there. If you don't simply avoid these kind of locations what do you do to make sure you have enough charge available in remote areas?
When we travel with our camper, I definitely do logistical pre-planning so that I know where our charges will be. There are stretches with my older Model X where we need a campground between charging stops, but those aren't too frequent on the routes we camp. We do boondock in Forest Service campgrounds; this is my personal favorite way to camp. But you are correct that we cannot (and do not) pick the very remote spots. Most of the time I plan those near a town where there is a charger, or shortly after our last charger was visited. And you're correct that transportation after setting up camp can be important - we hike almost exclusively every day that we camp, so we're usually driving to the trailheads in the morning and driving back in the evenings. That can chew up some range in the mountains. So all of that has to go into the plan - either there's a charger nearby and we charge on one of our outings, or I ensure that our trailheads aren't too far away from the campsite.

Our longest haul in a day was just over 400 miles. No, it's not the great distances others go with their ICE TVs. But it's not shabby, especially for our lower range Model X.

There is currently one place on my list which is inconvenient to reach at this time - King's Canyon and Sequoia National Parks. Infrastructure is limited around there. We could spend a night at a hookup campground at the base and make it in to camp in the parks, but it's not comfortable with range, etc. I wouldn't be surprised to see a Supercharger in much closer range before long, though.

I hope this answers the question about misconceptions. I'm not sure if your response was the one I was remembering when I typed my post. I got the impression that some people thought EV campers wouldn't be able to stop to charge, couldn't go farther than a campground in a day, etc. That's not true. I've been upfront in my thread about the fact that there are true limitations - things take longer, for sure - but that doesn't mean it's not possible or even plausible.
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Old 02-07-2020, 01:37 AM   #88
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Thank you OTRA15 for starting this thread, and particularly Ohmman for being an early adopter of this new iteration of electrical transportation. A very enlightening and enjoyable read from everyone.
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Old 02-07-2020, 03:16 PM   #89
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I hope this answers the question about misconceptions. I'm not sure if your response was the one I was remembering when I typed my post. I got the impression that some people thought EV campers wouldn't be able to stop to charge, couldn't go farther than a campground in a day, etc. That's not true. I've been upfront in my thread about the fact that there are true limitations - things take longer, for sure - but that doesn't mean it's not possible or even plausible.
ohmman, thanks for your reply, you answered my questions. We have a larger trailer with a much higher tongue weight than yours and that, plus some other issues, would make towing with the present EV options a stretch for us. But it sounds like you've been able to make it work so more power to you! (pun intended )
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Old 02-17-2020, 09:32 AM   #90
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Interesting article about Teslaís onboard computers... at least six years ahead of the rest of the industry... of particular interest are the comments about streamlining the supply chain (efficiency).

https://asia.nikkei.com/Business/Automobiles/Tesla-teardown-finds-electronics-6-years-ahead-of-Toyota-and-VW2
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Old 02-17-2020, 12:38 PM   #91
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You should use Plugshare.com to search for chargers. They're a much better resource.
I have Plugshare but had primarily looked other than where I live. Out of interest, I looked at downtown Vancouver BC, where I reside and worked, to see what the recent development in charging infrastructure has been. On the downtown peninsula, I found 75 fast charging locations (I excluded all the residential charging points and the slower wall outlets). These aren't outlets on the map; one of the Tesla Supercharger locations has 22 bays, for example, but is still shown as one location.

Our strata is but one building in downtown. We are working now on installing 160 Level 2 chargers for residents.

Just over 100,000 people live in this neighbourhood, and more work here as it is the largest job centre in BC.

There is a red star on the graphic. That is the last gasoline station in downtown Vancouver, as the others have all closed over the past years. (they don't sell diesel) This one is also scheduled to close, but the date hasn't been announced.

I fully understand that downtown Vancouver is not the same as small town USA. People don't camp downtown here (the nearest RV campground is 1.7 km from downtown) but they do tow through here. We have lots of RV dealerships in the suburbs, where the car dealerships have relocated to.

The last traditional downtown car dealership closed. Tesla opened their third location, and all of them are within walking distance from my home.

The contrast between the past and one (local) view of the future struck me.
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Old 02-17-2020, 12:41 PM   #92
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Thanks for those details and the map.

A staggering shift!



If you have the time and inclination, it might be interesting to zoom out 20-30 miles, and show the gas stations as red stars IMO.

Thanks,

Peter
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Old 02-17-2020, 01:42 PM   #93
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Thanks for those details and the map.

A staggering shift!



If you have the time and inclination, it might be interesting to zoom out 20-30 miles, and show the gas stations as red stars IMO.

Thanks,

Peter
Thanks, I found it staggering as well.

There are clearly more gas stations in the suburbs. Anyone can check Plugshare on line; I just looked and got around 400 fast charging locations in Metro Vancouver, which includes 23 municipalities. A vast part of our suburban area is zoned residential, and those people living there currently need gas stations if they have an ICE vehicle.. They don't need public charging points as much, since they can generally all charge at home. Not all strata residents have been able to, but the imminent arrival of right to charge legislation is likely to help that.

What the first map showed was an inkling of the future. It helps here in Vancouver that sunset dates have been established for the sale of ICE personal vehicles, and that our electricity is somewhere over 95% generated by renewable means, so those who consider the sustainable element important have a clear path forward.

A primary interest for me is in the economy and jobs. I used to work in a fuel distributor (gas, diesel, home heating oil); in an independent garage with fuel pumps; and at one point years ago, in a large Ford truck dealership.

The fuel distributor is gone. The independent garage is still in business, but no longer sells fuel. The truck dealership closed; their parent car dealership was a Ford/Mercury outlet, and it is now an MEC outdoor store (like an REI).

Jobs have changed. They are still there, but they are different jobs in many cases.
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Old 02-17-2020, 02:36 PM   #94
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jcl View Post
I have Plugshare but had primarily looked other than where I live. Out of interest, I looked at downtown Vancouver BC, where I reside and worked, to see what the recent development in charging infrastructure has been. On the downtown peninsula, I found 75 fast charging locations (I excluded all the residential charging points and the slower wall outlets). These aren't outlets on the map; one of the Tesla Supercharger locations has 22 bays, for example, but is still shown as one location.

Our strata is but one building in downtown. We are working now on installing 160 Level 2 chargers for residents.

Just over 100,000 people live in this neighbourhood, and more work here as it is the largest job centre in BC.

There is a red star on the graphic. That is the last gasoline station in downtown Vancouver, as the others have all closed over the past years. (they don't sell diesel) This one is also scheduled to close, but the date hasn't been announced.

I fully understand that downtown Vancouver is not the same as small town USA. People don't camp downtown here (the nearest RV campground is 1.7 km from downtown) but they do tow through here. We have lots of RV dealerships in the suburbs, where the car dealerships have relocated to.

The last traditional downtown car dealership closed. Tesla opened their third location, and all of them are within walking distance from my home.

The contrast between the past and one (local) view of the future struck me.
Thanks for posting this, JCL! I don't have an electric vehicle yet, but I just checked Plugshare and found there are 12 public charging stations within a 10 minute drive of my semi-rural home, with a total of 32 charge points. There are 18 gas stations in the same area, so probably 3 or 4 times as many gas pumps as charge points.

I'm curious, has anyone heard how many charging stations will be required when most vehicles are electric? Will we need more than the current number of gas pumps (since charging takes longer) or fewer, since many people will be able to charge at home or work?
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Old 02-17-2020, 04:18 PM   #95
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I'm curious, has anyone heard how many charging stations will be required when most vehicles are electric? Will we need more than the current number of gas pumps (since charging takes longer) or fewer, since many people will be able to charge at home or work?
Interesting question. I have no idea. But I think it depends on the nature of trips in the area in question. One way to calculate it would be to determine the % of charges a typical EV owner does at home or work, vs public stations.

I showed public charge stations on the map, but there are many times that that are behind gates, whether for work or residences. I don't plan to use any of those public charge stations. If someone comes to visit me with an EV, they wouldn't likely use a public charge point (although there are two being installed on the street in front of our building), they would more likely use one of my spots in our parkade (two spaces, with a single charge station between them. That is unless they have an over height vehicle, such as a 4wd HD pickup, or a van, which won't fit under the security gate.

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Old 02-17-2020, 05:48 PM   #96
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JCL...thank you so much for sharing this really interesting info!
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Old 02-17-2020, 11:05 PM   #97
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I'm curious, has anyone heard how many charging stations will be required when most vehicles are electric? Will we need more than the current number of gas pumps (since charging takes longer) or fewer, since many people will be able to charge at home or work?
One important thing to note is that public charging stations enable two things:

1. Travel away from home
2. Standard travel for those in apartments or rentals that don't offer EV charging.

For a traditional living arrangement in a single family home, your charging station for everything outside of road trips is the home. We have two EVs - a nearly six-year-old Model S and a four-year-old Model X. The X became our road trip car and TV, and I haven't charged my S publicly in over two years. I have put tens of thousands of miles on it, but I never stop to charge because it charges in my garage while I sleep.

The thing that's not reflected on that PlugShare map is the private home chargers that aren't shared. I personally shared mine when PlugShare started, because it was a real thing to have to ask strangers for a charge back then. But nobody contacts me about my private charger anymore. There are too many public ones available.

DavidsonOverlander, I realize I didn't answer your question but only emphasized the need for an answer. My guess is that we'd need less. Since I've never used a station on my Model S, it seems that there are many people who would never see one. Those with single family homes who stay within 200-300 miles of home daily - that's a good chunk of the population.
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Old 02-18-2020, 01:50 AM   #98
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Thanks for the recent comments.

Peter
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Old 02-18-2020, 12:07 PM   #99
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Mr. Musk is a very smart man who introduces new products long before they are ready for prime time. In doing so he generates excitement, debate and wonder. And very high stock value. Tesla stock valuation at the moment exceeds GM, Ford, and Chrysler-Fiat combined. This is no small feat. The target market for his pickup truck it not the over-sixty crowd who buy Airstreams. And probably not people pull any trailers other than small boats. And whether his truck hits the market next year or in 3 years, he has already stolen the lead in yet another transportation niche.

I noticed a few respondents to this thread own Tesla's. I do not, but I do have a deposit down for the "Y" that is supposed to be out next year. We took a Model X for a test drive 2 years ago and we were thoroughly impressed. We couldn't afford the $145,000 price tag but it is one heck of an impressive vehicle. I suggest anyone who doubts the quality and engineering Tesla has put into their cars take one for a ride. It's a truly great experience. For a company brand new to automotive design and manufacturing to develop such a vehicle as quickly as they did is very impressive.
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Old 02-25-2020, 11:30 AM   #100
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Fascinating

A curious indication that the cyber truck may do well regardless.

https://apple.news/AZCT5h6zCQVK0xZqo5HLovg
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