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Old 12-31-2019, 10:52 AM   #41
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A Cybertruck ought to be able to tow a trailer for 100 miles or so on one charge, so if your campground is within that distance it should be easy. If you have to stop to recharge along the way, good luck finding a pull-through charge station. But I suspect people will be buying these trucks not for their towing practicality or their MPGe but for their toy value or trend setting capacity.
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Old 12-31-2019, 11:47 AM   #42
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No, period. Even if it would pull it, it couldn't stop it or control it on a down hill twisty road.
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Old 12-31-2019, 12:06 PM   #43
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I typically post long, detailed messages. In this case, given my experience towing cargo trailers with the two v6 Tacomas I’ve owned and now over 30,000 miles with our 25’ Airstream behind our 5.7L Tundra I’ll simply say this about a 27’ Airstream behind a Taco:

Nope.
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Old 12-31-2019, 01:04 PM   #44
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While at the L.A. Auto Show in November, I was approached by a very nice lady. I was looking at the Duramax engine display. She said I was looking at obsolete technology. She suggested the Cybertruck as the future. May be true someday but certainly not in my lifetime. I am a retired senior. We had a pleasant discussion about the pros and cons of electric power as a tow platform. The previous video answered some of the questions I raised. A 2021 GMC 2500HD Duramax is in my future.
Look at your door sticker. What is the payload capacity and Gross Combined Weight rating of your Tacoma. With two passengers and tongue weight subtracted from payload you are probably exceeding payload. You are probably also exceeding your GCW rating.
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Old 12-31-2019, 01:14 PM   #45
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I had a Toyota Tacoma with the six cylinder engine and the class IV tow package. When I bought a 2018 27FB FC, I traded it in on a Ford F150 with the V6 eco-boost 3.5 L, max tow package with 3.55 axle ratio. While I could have done the dry weight; I could do not the max weight. My dealer suggested I might start by using the Tacoma and then swap out, but I chose to simply go to the bigger truck.
Best wishes for 2020,
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Old 12-31-2019, 01:50 PM   #46
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Toyota has put V8's in some medium sized trucks such as the 4Runner and Tacoma sometimes, but not every year. Tow capacities change with different versions. The OP has a 2012 and it is rated at 3,500 lbs. unless it has the tow package. The 2012 Tacoma with tow package capacity is 6,400 lbs. All this gets pretty confusing, but in the end, the 25, 27, and 28' are in my opinion too much weight for a Tacoma. Sorry I missed the tow package, but in my experience tow packages for Toyotas only were for bigger battery, alternator, etc. I have moved a similarly heavy trailer several feet with an FJ Cruiser (3,500 lbs., V6), but would not want to go further.

Some claim the Tundra is not enough to tow a midrange Airstream. We had a 25' (actually 25' 11") and the we ever had a problem towing it with the Tundra for more than 60,000 miles. The truck is now at 130,000 and still runs like new. I believe the 27 or 28 could be towed with a Tundra, but it would be closer on Tundra cargo wt. Some Forum members claim you need a heavier truck for that and/or a diesel. I disagree.

A 2012 Tacoma will last for many more years and it is hard to sell it and get something else. We did just that when we bought the Airstream. The Tundra is big and we really preferred a smaller truck (we had the first Tundra which was changed to a Tacoma when the bigger Tundra came out in 2007), but we wanted to tow safely.

The other issue is the Tesla. There is a lengthy and sometimes argumentative thread on the Tesla truck. It has been "temporarily" closed for "housekeeping" for a week or more and it seems it will never come back, but it is still on the Forum. There may be other Tesla threads. Aside from Tesla being late with every model, specs for a truck that hasn't been built yet or fully tested will change. Musk is better at promotion than he is in meeting deadlines. Maybe the range will be better, maybe worse. Maybe the price will change and probably it will go up. I suspect towing a heavy trailer will be a challenge because of range issues, and possibly for other issues when towing such as stability, reliability. Building a truck for use as a truck is difficult—it has to satisfy people for comfort when they buy it as a vanity truck and it has to satisfy those who use it to haul or tow stuff. These are hard to reconcile. Mostly Tesla buyers will never use it as a work truck because it is much too expensive, but some will tow with it. Until it comes out, it is a crap shoot. Putting down a hundred bucks is no big deal, but do you really know what you will get?

I also agree that adding weight to the rear of the trailer is a very bad idea. And there is no safe way to attach the tanks to the rear. The rear bumper will not support that weight all that well considering you will have to secure them safely? You may have legal issues with how to transport propane tanks. I certainly would not want to behind a trailer with propane tanks jury rigged to the rear. And if you put the spare in the back of the truck, you subtract from already low truck cargo capacity.

There is no easy way out of this. There have been endless discussions on the Forum over the years how to deal with weight considerations with half ton trucks. The Tacoma is not a half ton truck. It can be done, but it takes some thinking about things most of us never think about until we want a travel trailer. You have come to right place to figure this out, but it takes time to get it right. Youbhave to consider tongue wt., hitch wt., hitch type, truck GVWR, axle capacity, overall towing capacity, truck cargo limits, how weight distribution affects some of those weight numbers. When we first tried to understand this I sure didn't want to sell a perfectly good truck and buy another one, but we did. I also tried every way I could to figure out how to make a first generation Tundra work, but it could not for a 25', much less a longer trailer. The suggestions to buy a used 2nd generation Tundra until you have a Tesla (or don't) or to rent a truck for a trip may be your best solution if you trust the Tesla will work whenever it comes. The Rivian is an alternative, but it is also full of questions including range, price and when. I would love an electric truck, but i think it will be more years before the right one comes out and while a hybrid could solve a lot of problems, no one seems to want to make one. Toyota has turned to hydrogen, speed and provocative styling, so I am disappointed in a company which has sold us many excellent vehicles, but they don;t listen to me. I think hydrogen as a practical alternative is even further away and may never be successful; it may be Betamax.
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Old 12-31-2019, 02:03 PM   #47
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Tacoma Tow Vehicle-27 Foot Flying Cloud?

I tow my 2007 22 foot International CCD with a 2012 Tacoma V6 4x4. It’s on the edge of practical but not overloaded. I drive conservatively and carefully.

Given a future choice, I will update the tow vehicle to a V8 Tundra 4x4 with all the goodies. For now, I spend a lot of time in the slow lane up long hills with the V6. I like my toyotas for their reliability and comfort, but a Tundra with a bigger engine, and the consequent MPG hit will be a lot better for staying up with traffic.

Since I’m semi-retired, I have lots of patience for now. DW and I stay away from any and all “gotta get there” travel scenarios. If we’re on a tight schedule, we board the dogs with a friend and fly.

That said, I would not try to tow a 27 footer with a Tacoma, and I’d be checking specifications very carefully with a Tundra.

Messing with tongue weight by improperly loading the Airstream is dangerous territory and a great way to use up “at least one fatal error” that everyone is entitled to.
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Old 12-31-2019, 02:12 PM   #48
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I use a 2012 Taco to tow my 19’ Bambi. I have used it coast to coast, and it does fine. Long mountain grades are tedious, but I am not doing that very often. That said, I cannot imagine anything beyond maybe a 22’ with this TV. Even then, it may meet the manufacturer specs, but practical experience will not be very good IMHO. The kicker is that fuel mileage may actually be worse than with a bigger TV!

I would find a newer Tundra...
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Old 12-31-2019, 03:31 PM   #49
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"Time to trade in that Tacoma for a Tundra !"
___________________________________

Time to trade in that Tacoma for a proper TV, a Ram/Cummins.
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Old 12-31-2019, 03:53 PM   #50
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"Time to trade in that Tacoma for a Tundra !"

___________________________________



Time to trade in that Tacoma for a proper TV, a Ram/Cummins.


That becomes a fanboy argument in a hurry. When Toyotas comes out with a diesel I’ll consider it. Otherwise a Toyota gasser is what I’ll stick with for dead solid reliability. The Cummins is a great engine and drivetrain that needs a solid vehicle around it.
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Old 12-31-2019, 04:00 PM   #51
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Any shiney new vehicle turns into "transportation" after a year or less.

Your Tacoma may tow a 27 foot airstream, but it will not STOP one. And when you are.passed by your own Airstream which is lying.on its side... it is a bit late to reconsider your options. Rent a truck from Enterprise or Penske when you start... or pay a buddy to move the trailer for you. Start shopping for a real tow vehicle (used is fine, especially if it is a fuel hog that takes a ladder to get into and a parachute to get out of!) Keep the taco or trade it in as you choose, It is a nice truck on the lightweight side.

Be safe, and welcome to aluminitis! We were all newbies once... and hey I thought I could tow a 19' with a Lexus Rx 300.
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Old 12-31-2019, 04:35 PM   #52
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...
Your Tacoma may tow a 27 foot airstream, but it will not STOP one. ...
My Airstream will stop my rig all by itself. The job isn't done by the tow vehicle alone. The trailer, if set up properly, will contribute to the overall stopping power. More internet FUD
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Old 01-01-2020, 07:09 AM   #53
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I'm as bullish as anyone. A 27' AS unfortunately is absolutely outside the capacity range of a Tacoma. From a power, capacity, payload, stability, etc. Just not a good idea. Coming from an owner of a 27FB, towing with a heavyweight Lexus Land Cruiser.

BTW, for anyone that ever suggests lightening tongue weight, it's an incredibly bad idea. Especially moving weight from the tongue to the rear of a trailer. Tongue weight increases stability. Moving weight aft has the effect of potentially dramatically decreasing stability.

OK, the Tacoma is too light, but there is too much focus on payload. The payload numbers are for NOT towing when the payload (except for 150lbs in the driver seat) could mostly be in the bed of the truck. It is better to use axle ratings, GVWRs and GCVWR.

Tongue should be in the range of 10% to 15% of the actual trailer weight. If you are at 15%, reducing a little is OK. But sway is reduced with increased tongue weight. Make sure to weight the rig and know your axle weights and tongue weight.

Not using a WD hitch for 27' makes little sense to me. I have a 28' and it is very similar to the 27.
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Old 01-01-2020, 09:54 AM   #54
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Having too much tongue weight can be worse than having too little. If you have too much the trailer can push the back of the tow vehicle around and cause it to jackknife in a hard turn. If you have 15% tongue weight you will actually increase your rig's stability by taking weight off the tongue and putting it in the back closer to the trailer's center of gravity. 10% tongue weight is generally considered to be a good number. But there is always a trade off between too little tongue weight resulting in sway or too much tongue weight resulting in jackknifing.
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Old 01-02-2020, 12:26 PM   #55
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My Airstream will stop my rig all by itself. The job isn't done by the tow vehicle alone. The trailer, if set up properly, will contribute to the overall stopping power. More internet FUD
Yes, and no. If the trailer has the standard electric brakes, and most do, the amount of stopping power is not all that great. The truck still accounts for the bulk of the stopping and while the trailer brakes contribute, the overall stopping distance of a tow vehicle and trailer is more than the truck alone. If the trailer has disc brakes, they work a lot better, but I doubt you can find any objective info on that combination. You can convert the trailer brakes to discs, but it is expensive. You will still have an underpowered and overloaded tow vehicle.

You may notice the recommendation not to tow with the Tacoma is almost universal except in some very short and easy situations.
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Old 01-02-2020, 12:50 PM   #56
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We use 3/4 ton Suburban to tow a 25ft Eddie Bauer in Florida. A safe tow setup. Your proposal is dangerous. Don't do it. If you can't afford a proper TV, you can't afford an Airstream.
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Old 01-02-2020, 02:56 PM   #57
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You may notice the recommendation not to tow with the Tacoma is almost universal except in some very short and easy situations.
Worth noting that that is exactly what the OP was asking about. The hypothetical was, using it once or twice, on flat ground. Instead of trading it in, he could simply take a second vehicle along with all the family and luggage. I’d use the Tacoma, and manage the cargo weight. Or rent a vehicle. I wouldn’t purchase an interim vehicle.
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Old 01-02-2020, 04:25 PM   #58
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Worth noting that that is exactly what the OP was asking about. The hypothetical was, using it once or twice, on flat ground. Instead of trading it in, he could simply take a second vehicle along with all the family and luggage. I’d use the Tacoma, and manage the cargo weight. Or rent a vehicle. I wouldn’t purchase an interim vehicle.
Yes, he did say that and hasn't explained what that means—how flat, how far, how often? Probably longer than he expected if he is waiting for the Tesla.

I like the idea of taking stuff in a second vehicle to lighten the load—possibly any passengers, food, water, trailer spare tire, tools, etc. Those are probably among the heaviest things. My concern is he is trying to talk himself into something because he doesn't like the alternatives. I think everyone does that sometimes and when you do, hopefully friends will alert you to your mistakes.
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Old 01-02-2020, 06:29 PM   #59
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Yes, and no. If the trailer has the standard electric brakes, and most do, the amount of stopping power is not all that great. The truck still accounts for the bulk of the stopping and while the trailer brakes contribute, the overall stopping distance of a tow vehicle and trailer is more than the truck alone. If the trailer has disc brakes, they work a lot better, but I doubt you can find any objective info on that combination. You can convert the trailer brakes to discs, but it is expensive. You will still have an underpowered and overloaded tow vehicle.

You may notice the recommendation not to tow with the Tacoma is almost universal except in some very short and easy situations.
Actually, Adventure.AS has it right here. The recommendation not to tow with a Tacoma is less on this.

There is some basis to what you're suggesting on behalf of types of brakes, but not because the tow vehicle lends to the bulk of the braking. If what you're suggesting where true, it would be a recipe for jackknifing. One should really turn up the brake gain if you feel that the trailer is being stopped by the tow vehicle.

BTW, HD trucks don't exactly stop great for emergency braking on account of their weights. HD trucks lashed up with a trailer may not necessarily stop shorter.
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Old 01-03-2020, 07:36 AM   #60
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Everyone,

First off I want to thank you all so much for incredible amount of energy and thought you have put into my question; I’ve learned a lot already just from google spiraling on some of the things you mentioned. I’m not going to try and summarize it all here because of time considerations, but here’s what I’ve come down on.

Regarding buying the airstream, I don’t think I have to wait to buy until I have a larger truck. The dealership is 60 miles from my house on flat, straight, southern Alabama freeway and I feel comfortable staying in the slow lane at 60 and significantly increasing my prepare to stop and stopping distances. For reference, I am am military pilot and have a LOT of experience manipulating heavyweight vehicles (we routinely taxi and takeoff at 1.5x the original max gross weight of the aircraft!). Brake energy, stopping distance calculations, friction, wet surface vs dry, etc. I have run all those numbers and while I think the number/type of trips we might take with the trailer and the Tacoma tow vehicle is extremely limited (as will the amount of stuff we can take with us...) I would be comfortable with the 1 or 2 trips to Conecuh for stargazing (about 100 miles, again flat and straight highway.)

In the meantime I am going to pursue upgrading to a Tundra. I own my Tacoma outright and have no interest in going back into debt, so I’d need to keep the delta at around $5k. This pretty much puts me at a 2WD 5.7L, depending on age crewman or doublecab will both work. If I can find one and a dealer who will work with me on the Tacoma trade in (would like to see 20K for it at least) then I’ll pull the trigger on the larger truck and install a Teconsha brake controller. This should set me up for the gap until the Cybertruck arrives.

I don’t want to start a firestorm but my thoughts on the electric trucks are as follows. The base assumption people are making with their “electric trucks are bad” is that the battery capacity is double that of a sedan. This is complete conjecture as no one knows what those specs are. Additionally, no one knows what the real-world performance will be. Any truck pulling a max-weight trailer (which is what I’ve seen on the engineering explained forums) will have a SIGNIFICANT reduction in range wether it’s gas or electric. Electric will require longer stops to charge the battery than dump dinosaurs into the tank. We have already decided to accept this as a shift in our paradigm; drive for a few hours, stop and stretch the legs and feed the kids, then get back in. Means a more sedate pace of travel, but we are towing a small house behind us so there’s that. And when we get to the campsite, mostly I figure there will be power available there so.... just charge it up!

Ultimately, I’m definitely not first in line for the truck so if it comes out and the towing range numbers really are terrible, I can just...not buy it.

Thank you all again for all of your help and knowledge in this journey, and I hope to see you out there on the road!
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