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Old 01-26-2015, 10:20 PM   #1
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New tires for 2015?

Hi, today I went to my local Ford dealer. The same one where I bought my 2014 F-150. I wanted an up close look at the new 2015 Aluminum F-150. At first, I couldn't find one, but I found one, only one hidden in their back lot. Must be already sold. Driving by the dealer, but un-able to stop, I have seen some 2015 F-150's out front, but they must be selling well because those are all gone. Anyway, I was looking at this truck, all of it, and noticed something strange about the tires on it. These tires show the size, but they don't say "P" or "LT" on them. So what are they? Did they decide to not mark tires on pick-ups as "P" passenger type tires?
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Old 01-26-2015, 10:26 PM   #2
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M+S tires: M+S, or M&S: Mud and Snow; A tire that meets the Rubber Manufacturers Association (RMA) and Rubber Association of Canada (RAC) all-season tire definition.[17] These are winter tires, with self-cleaning tread and average traction in muddy or very snowy conditions, and for low temperatures. Spike tires have an additional letter, "E" (M+SE).

Just another classification of tires.
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Old 01-27-2015, 02:22 AM   #3
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ROBERTSUNRUS, these appear to be the tires in your photo:

http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tires....omCompare1=yes

While the "SL" indicates that this is a "standard load" passenger car tire, the 51 psi max pressure is higher than usual. However, the maximum load rating of 2,679 pounds certainly seems adequate for a pickup.

Partial description extracted from TireRack.com:

"The Wrangler Fortitude HT is Goodyear’s premium Highway All-Season tire developed for pickup truck, crossover and sport utility vehicle drivers with long to-do and want-to-do lists. Already earning on-road fitments as Original Equipment on popular 2015 model-year light trucks, Wrangler Fortitude HT tires are designed to blend ride comfort and long wear with all-season traction in dry, wet and wintry driving conditions, even in light snow.

"Wrangler Fortitude HT tires feature Goodyear’s innovative lower rolling resistance tread compound to enhance vehicle fuel efficiency."
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Old 01-27-2015, 04:54 AM   #4
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OMG.....GYM's for TV's.

Unlace 'em and replace 'em.

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Old 01-27-2015, 07:20 AM   #5
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Those would be Euro Metric tires.

http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tirete....jsp?techid=24
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Old 01-27-2015, 09:51 AM   #6
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Actually it's becoming norm to put those stupid Goodyear Wranglers on trucks, P metric or passenger rated tires. It provides a smoother ride. Most folks who buy 1/2 tons are not serious like someone who posts on a forum asking for questions. By that, I just mean that you're probably already ahead of the average truck buyer.

My Ram 1500 came with brand spanking new Good Wrangler SR-A's 275/60/20's they are P metric. The reviews online are not encouraging, they're soft and mushy. The ride however is very smooth. Heavier load range E tires would provide a harsher ride.

They haven't been terrible while towing, but I don't like them all that much in the rain even when not towing. I'll probably replace mine at some point.

Those with a 17 inch rim, are in luck and can easily switch to a Load Range D or E tire.

I can only get a load range E in my tire size by buying an A/T tire or going up one tire size to 275/65/20.

Ugh.
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Old 01-27-2015, 09:58 AM   #7
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5300lbs payload on those tires greatly exceeds the rear and front GAWR of an F150 even with HD Payload Pkg. I'd use them until they wore out.

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Old 01-27-2015, 11:11 AM   #8
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Speaking of tires and wheels I was thinking of keeping my 15" rims but still go with a LT tire. I believe Michelin makes such a tire. What would be the pros and cons of doing this?
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Old 01-27-2015, 11:27 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by graysailor View Post
Speaking of tires and wheels I was thinking of keeping my 15" rims but still go with a LT tire. I believe Michelin makes such a tire. What would be the pros and cons of doing this?
Your trailer weight would exceed maximum with 15 inch Michelin LTXs. These tires are rated 2150 lbs at 50 psi. Derating by 10% for trailer use would reset their rating to 1935 lbs each for a total of 7740 lbs.

GVWR on a 30 foot Flying Cloud is >8000 lbs, you would need to upsize to 16 inch if you want to go to LTX tires.
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Old 01-27-2015, 11:48 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by graysailor View Post
Speaking of tires and wheels I was thinking of keeping my 15" rims but still go with a LT tire. I believe Michelin makes such a tire. What would be the pros and cons of doing this?
There are many threads on this question you posed.
The 15" Michelin LTX M/S2 is a "P" 235/75/15. Not enough tire for you in my opinion.

Here are two 15" options that would work.

http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tires....omCompare1=yes

Nokian Rotiiva AT LT235/75/15
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Old 01-27-2015, 01:04 PM   #11
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Even back in '07, our new Tundra came with Goodrich P tires, Load Range C. I never looked until I had the truck for a while and was surprised to see passenger tires. I should have looked because maybe I could have bargained for LT's. They were crappy tires that wore fast. I replaced them with Michelin LTX Load Range E tires—they rode better and lasted 70,000 miles.

I think they have found a way to not have the "P" on the tire so they can fool people into believing it is a real truck tire. I thought there were federal regulations about the markings so I'm wondering how they got around that.

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Old 01-27-2015, 02:16 PM   #12
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Michelin also has non-P tires

I just bought new tires for my TV. 275/55R20 size. While shopping, I noticed that Michelin offers two versions of LTX M/S2 in this size. One is P275/55R20 111T. The other has no P: 275/55R20 113H. The local tire store said what was also said earlier in this thread: The non-P tire is a "Euro Metric" spec tire.

The other interesting thing about Michelin is their web site does not abide by the defined load ratings such as 111 and 113. According to DiscountTire.com, 111 load index equals 2403 pounds load rating, but Michelin lists the max load as 2185. For 113 (2535 rating), Michelin says 2304 pounds. So it looks like Michelin is doing the "derating" calculation.
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Old 01-27-2015, 02:21 PM   #13
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The other interesting thing about Michelin is their web site does not abide by the defined load ratings such as 111 and 113. According to DiscountTire.com, 111 load index equals 2403 pounds load rating, but Michelin lists the max load as 2185. For 113 (2535 rating), Michelin says 2304 pounds. So it looks like Michelin is doing the "derating" calculation.
The "P" designation is used by the TRA organization. The "P" is not used by the ETRTO organization.

The two organizations use different load index calculations.

Tire code - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Old 01-27-2015, 03:09 PM   #14
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Old 01-28-2015, 06:20 AM   #15
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A couple of thoughts:

1) Both the Europeans (ETRTO) and the Japanese (JATMA) omit the letters in front of their passenger car tires. They both have versions of LT tires, but they aren't consistent with the US practice in their marking of those types of tires.

2) As far back as I can remember, ALL the pickup manufacturers have been using P type tires on their 1/2 ton PU's. The use of LT tires on 1/2 tons is a relatively recent phenomenon (circa 2000).

3) While it is surprising to see Ford use a non-US tire sizing nomenclature, I wonder if this has anything to do with global integration. Vehicles are being designed all over the globe, and I wonder if the tires and wheel part was farmed out to a non-US location.
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Old 01-30-2015, 06:08 PM   #16
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Tire recommendation

I started out with a 17' Airstream so only got a 1/2 ton pickup. Later I got a 27' Airstream (actually 27' 11") and continued to pull it with the same 1/2 ton pickup. Without going into all the specifics, I wound up rolling the 27' Airstream a couple years later. I did not let the wife drive the truck pulling the 27 footer because I didn't feel it was safe for her to pull (even though it had all the right equipment, anti-sway, load levelers, etc.)

I subsequently purchased a 25' Airstream (with a different anti-sway system).

When it came time to replace tires on the truck I made what I consider to be a MONUMENTAL single improvement. I had been using the largest Michelin tires that would work for my 2005 Silverado. When I went to replace them I found that the 3/4 ton & 1-ton trucks use a different tire. Whereas the tires recommended for 1/2 ton trucks inflate at something like 44 psi maximum (don't remember exactly), the tires for the 3/4 & 1-ton pickups inflate to 80 psi maximum. I installed the higher pressure "Michelin LTX M/S 2, ALL SEASON, LT265/70R17 LRE ORWL, MSPN 97723" tires and could not believe the difference in towing. I believe that these tires may have made the difference in rolling or not rolling my previous 27' Airstream.

Everybody you ask gives you different recommendations on inflation pressures. I use the truck only when towing, so I settled in on 70 psi in the front, 75 psi in the rear, and 40 psi in the spare (obviously I didn't replace the spare).

I would still recommend a 3/4 ton truck if you go to the 27' (28') route, but if you are going to pull it with a 1/2 ton I definitely recommend you switch to higher pressure tires. They are costly (I think I paid about $1,300 for four tires), but they make a tremendous difference in towing safety.
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Old 01-31-2015, 08:39 AM   #17
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Windy', you switched from Load Range C to Load Range E tires. Michelin recommended with Load Range E LTX Tires on my half ton Tundra that 42 front and 45 rear was appropriate, and add 3 lbs. for towing. The E tires will take 80 lbs., but it is not necessary to make them that hard for the load.

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Old 01-31-2015, 09:35 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by WindyJim View Post
I started out with a 17' Airstream so only got a 1/2 ton pickup. Later I got a 27' Airstream (actually 27' 11") and continued to pull it with the same 1/2 ton pickup. Without going into all the specifics, I wound up rolling the 27' Airstream a couple years later. I did not let the wife drive the truck pulling the 27 footer because I didn't feel it was safe for her to pull (even though it had all the right equipment, anti-sway, load levelers, etc.)

I subsequently purchased a 25' Airstream (with a different anti-sway system).

When it came time to replace tires on the truck I made what I consider to be a MONUMENTAL single improvement. I had been using the largest Michelin tires that would work for my 2005 Silverado. When I went to replace them I found that the 3/4 ton & 1-ton trucks use a different tire. Whereas the tires recommended for 1/2 ton trucks inflate at something like 44 psi maximum (don't remember exactly), the tires for the 3/4 & 1-ton pickups inflate to 80 psi maximum. I installed the higher pressure "Michelin LTX M/S 2, ALL SEASON, LT265/70R17 LRE ORWL, MSPN 97723" tires and could not believe the difference in towing. I believe that these tires may have made the difference in rolling or not rolling my previous 27' Airstream.

Everybody you ask gives you different recommendations on inflation pressures. I use the truck only when towing, so I settled in on 70 psi in the front, 75 psi in the rear, and 40 psi in the spare (obviously I didn't replace the spare).

I would still recommend a 3/4 ton truck if you go to the 27' (28') route, but if you are going to pull it with a 1/2 ton I definitely recommend you switch to higher pressure tires. They are costly (I think I paid about $1,300 for four tires), but they make a tremendous difference in towing safety.

Genes point is correct. The half ton will operate better with closer tire pressure to spec. Weigh the truck at all corners with trailer hitched and WD applied, same load as if on a long trip.

Weigh it solo, with driver and usual gear aboard when not towing. Full fuel in both cases. All four wheel positions.

Then ask for pro advice on pressure.


The front axle tire pressure should probably be the same towing or empty if WD is adjusted correctly. It is the rear axle weights that will differ.

Pressure that is too high is bad for braking and maneuvering. Understeer is induced sooner. Adding plus five psi to Steer axle while towing is probably okay.

Don't rely on transitory response feeling when towing. Turn in will be slow as it has to account for the trailer axles to begin their turn as well. It is easy to overload the rear axle tires at this point. The truck, the trailer and the WD spring bridge must work together.
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