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Old 04-12-2020, 08:00 AM   #41
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Regarding the tow mirror question.

We have a 2014 Tundra that is my daily driver and it does not have tow mirrors.

I explored installing the Tundra tow mirrors.

If I were to have them, this would require a very tedious mirror-tuck-in each and every day going in and out of my garage.

It would also make my now-nimble city driver truck just a bit more challenging to park in tight spaces because of the bulkiness of the tow mirrors.

I decided that PITA was not worth it to me.

We use the McKesh mirrors with the convex spot on each side. My husband (who drives when we are towing) says that they are so superior to any OEM tow mirror that he would prefer the McKesh to OEM on our next one.
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Old 04-12-2020, 08:45 AM   #42
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Originally Posted by Piggy Bank View Post
.....I explored installing the Tundra tow mirrors.

If I were to have them, this would require a very tedious mirror-tuck-in each and every day going in and out of my garage.

It would also make my now-nimble city driver truck just a bit more challenging to park in tight spaces because of the bulkiness of the tow mirrors.

I decided that PITA was not worth it to me.

We use the McKesh mirrors with the convex spot on each side. My husband (who drives when we are towing) says that they are so superior to any OEM tow mirror that he would prefer the McKesh to OEM on our next one.

Do you know that the OEM mirrors slide in when not in use? I doubt that they are much larger than the standard mirrors when not out for towing. I do agree that it is a PITA to have to pull the driver's side mirror in each time I enter the garage though.



I really do like the view from your mirrors. The convex mirror at the bottom is nice to have. The OEM tow mirrors on the Tundra also has a convex mirror at the bottom. It is not powered like the top mirror is so I had to hand adjust it. Once set I can clearly and easily see the blind spots. This is perhaps the best feature of the system in my opinion and once set I don't have to make further adjustments. I had some McKesh mirrors years ago, not as nice as yours though, and I always had to realign them. The shaking was just too much.



I am glad you like your set up. But just HOW does he know that " they are so superior to any OEM tow mirror..."? Has he tried any OEM mirrors? Again, I am glad that he is happy with his choice and certainly understand why he would "prefer" his setup to others. I always like to hear other opinions in the forum. When folks try to insert statements as "facts" is when I start to wonder....
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Old 04-12-2020, 09:12 AM   #43
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Amen!
But for those of us who are not flush with cash and need to have our truck do double duty as a daily driver and grocery getter, I had to make a decision. I needed a vehicle that didn't require a stepladder to enter, didn't ride like an 18 wheeler, fit in a common parking space, and didn't cost $$$$.
Some people buy a new 250/350 every year and rave about how great they've been. I wanted to report back in ten years that my Tundra has been trouble free.
Yep!

When I was shopping for a TV I had to give Ford a shot. Was looking at the F150 with Ecoboost/turbo. I expressed my concern over the Ecoboost and engine life and was assured by the Ford salesman they can get up to 100,000 miles! I actually laughed out loud!

Went with the Tundra TRD 4x4 Double Cab. Dropped a Flip 4 tonneau cover on it which was the best upgrade! I still have a scar on my head from crawling in the bed with a shell. Now I just roll that thing up and walk back to the box I need gear out of.
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Old 04-12-2020, 09:51 AM   #44
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I have been towing either my '66 Globetrotter or "08 23-ft. CCD for years with my 2000 Tundra. Have owned it for 18 years and it's been the best vehicle I've ever owned. Keep thinking I'll need to replace it, but it still runs great, looks great and always gets 10-13 mpg. Would like my next TV to have fully independent suspension but only pickup that does is the Honda Ridgeline. The new Ridgeline has nearly the identical size and power as does my Tundra. Don't believe I can get the new Tundra in my garage along with the other two vehicles that are already parked there. Anyone out there have experience with the new Ridgeline?
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Old 04-12-2020, 10:57 AM   #45
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To the poster above, I put this out there a few years back and discussed both with people here and on the Tundra forums. Based on the specifics of my garage, If I changed to the Toyota tow mirrors that would necessitate needing to manually fold them in daily when parking at home in my garage. I don't have to do this currently with the stock mirrors. That alone was the specific reason for me not considering changing to the Toyota tow mirrors.


If you have different needs, knock yourself out and do what you prefer.

From what I can see, our setup gives more mirror surface area and views than we would have with the Toyota tow mirrors, as we still get the standard mirror view close to the vehicle. We have not driven with OEM tow mirrors, so cannot speak to that.

For us, using the McKesh mirrors are our preferred approach.
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Old 04-12-2020, 11:19 AM   #46
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Well as of now, long time Ford owner and in the past having one of those foreign vehicles you now just purchased. Before you say it, I know they are build here but the money you pay go's back to a different country. I can tell you this the over all power and handling there is nothing like a Ford.
As they say Build Ford Tuff and American Proud. THE Airstream is American build and the Ford fits perfect never had any issues!. Happy Now Ford Truck owner
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Old 04-12-2020, 11:36 AM   #47
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I Love Toyota, but...

In my opinion Toyota’s are the most reliable vehicles on the planet. I say this based on my experience with 3 Camry’s and a 2015 Tundra Crewmax 5.7. We pulled our 23D all over the country (except Pacific NW)with the Tundra. I believe That truck has enough power to pull any Airstream. We loved everything about our Tundra except for payload. We don’t travel light. with the tongue weight of even the 23D (800 lbs measured) We were left with only 500 lbs of payload... Add a topper and you’re down to 300. A trip to the CAT scales can be very revealing on how you stand with respect to GVWR.

When we upgraded to a 28RBT we traded for a F350 Diesel 4x4. The F350 6.7 is an amazing vehicle for trailer towing. I Don’t use it as a daily driver.. Most Airstream’ers I’ve met on caravans & rallies with a Ford Superduty are happy with them. But Like others, I’m keeping my fingers crossed on reliability.

BTW in terms of tow mirrors, the Superduty tow mirrors are the best I’ve seen: very large with a full with wide angle mirror across the bottom.
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Old 04-12-2020, 11:49 AM   #48
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Keeping my 2012 Tundra Dbl cab, 4x4. Pulls our 25GTFB just fine. Also doubles as our farm truck. Tires, oil, filters, etc.. I did have an axle seal leak on my FJ Cruiser at 190,000 miles.
I was a buy American guy for years, but hated the constant repairs I was having to deal with. Bought a Landcruiser about 25+ years ago. Nothing but Toyota’s ever since.
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Old 04-12-2020, 12:10 PM   #49
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Has anyone tried the extendable mirrors on a Tundra?
You can buy the Toyota branded for $500 or aftermarket lookalikes for $250. They mate to the wiring and use the turn lights and heat.
I currently have a set of CIPA slip on's which work great except they don't feel very secure. I lost one while looking for an exit to save it. Thankfully a replacement was only $25.
I put the generic tow mirrors on my truck, no issues after 9+ years
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Old 04-12-2020, 12:22 PM   #50
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I bought a Tundra in late 2010; we tow a 2009 25FB. Zero issues with the Tundra, wish I could say the same about the Airstream, lol. Like I tell all the SOB owners when camping - "Airstream's ARE NOT worth what you pay for them, but I'd buy another one.
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Old 04-12-2020, 12:43 PM   #51
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The one Question no one talks about when towing

I too used to tow with 2010 5.7V8 Tundra crew max. Excellent vehicle. Reliability is best in the industry. Towing capacity was fantastic.


BUT, the one modification I made that was frustrating me was the 'range' of towing capability with what I was towing turned out to be about 180 miles between fuel stops.


Today I understand there is a 32g increased fuel tank, you better get it unless you are ok with looking for fuel every 180-200 miles!



I installed a replacement fuel tank that extended my fuel to 46g, and could generally get 350 miles. (When fueling make sure you have 2 credit cards, as the pump shuts off at $100 - most fuel stops)


Once I was camping in Arizona and decided to get the Toyota dealer to change oil, I had coupons, and 6 mechanics & 2 managers were standing there to hand me my keys when they were finished with the oil change.


The asked, what that was under my vehicle, with the hopes it was an auxiliary fuel tank !



All of them were 'racers' and complained that towing their race cars to Tuscon they always had to refuel before making it all the way back to Phoenix.


They were pleased to learn where I had bought it etc,



I rarely see in the debates here anyone even think about how far can you tow w/o fueling again?


Too bad, as it isn't that I want to tow for hours, and hours, it's been my experience that you might need that extra distance on the occasion when there are no reasonable fuel stops where you are traveling. An extra 100 to 250 miles comes in handy in selecting where to get your fuel.


Transferflow.com is where I obtained the auxiliary tank. I'm not sure I would need one with the Tundra today using 32g tanks.
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Old 04-12-2020, 12:46 PM   #52
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The larger capacity tank is 38 Gallons.
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Old 04-12-2020, 01:28 PM   #53
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This is a helpful thread for me. I am full-timing (in place, not travelling) in a Classic 30 and am looking for the ideal TV for me. For my setup, it seems like it would really need to be either a maximally beefed up 1/2 ton or or a 3/4 truck as a TV. I am wanting one that can function as a daily driver as well and has the dependability of a Toyota. Max weight for my trailer is supposedly 10k lbs, and the max Tundra towing capability I can find is 10,200 lbs. That seems a little too close for comfort for a responsible tow. Once I do start travelling with my trailer, it might be a handful of times a year and I would take my 3 kids with me (ages 4-12). In light of what the OP and thread is discussing, does anyone here have advice for me regarding a Tundra setup that might work? Or, is there a different beefed up 1/2 ton that might make sense (i.e. the Nissan Titan, F150 twin turbo with tow package, etc.), or should I just spring for a 3/4 ton and eat the extra fuel costs as a daily driver?
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Old 04-12-2020, 01:56 PM   #54
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I just got home from my first road trip with my new 2020 Tundra. My Airstream is a 2014, 30' Serenity weighing 7020 pounds for this trip. Previously, I had a 2017 Ford F250 Powerstroke. The Ford pulled great and had more payload but I had a lot of trouble with it. I knew I was sacrificing towing ability and payload when I purchased the Tundra, but wanted the reliability of Toyota and a more comfortable daily driver.

My first trip, from Central Texas through Albuquerque, Flagstaff, Phoenix, Tucson, El Paso, and back to Central Texas was 2513 miles. 2238 towing and 275 not towing. When possible, I set my cruise control on 67. That is a speed I am comfortable going without feeling like I am rushing to get somewhere. A large stretch of the trip going west I had a 30 mph headwind. Also, went through a blizzard in Flagstaff.

My overall mpg was 10.53 mpg. I was very pleased with that. I would get 12.8 in my F250 under similar conditions. The Tundra did fine going up hills. Coming down, I would slow down, downshift, and take my time. I knew I would not be able to stop as promptly with the Tundra, so I gave myself plenty of distance.

I am pleased with my decision to purchase a Tundra. Towing (2-3 months of the year), I went from great to good. As a daily driver (9-10 months), I went from bad to great.
I am happy to hear you give yourself plenty of distance to stop, but I wonder if the maniacal drivers out there will respect the added clearance you need to stop that combination and not test your panic stop capabilities!
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Old 04-12-2020, 02:04 PM   #55
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Treat your Tundra well

I bought my 2017 Tundra SR5 w/ 5.7 V8 new, don't forget to do the break-in period recommended before you begin towing, its very important even with a beloved Toyota
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Old 04-12-2020, 03:10 PM   #56
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Originally Posted by Binsgrief View Post
This is a helpful thread for me. I am full-timing (in place, not travelling) in a Classic 30 and am looking for the ideal TV for me. For my setup, it seems like it would really need to be either a maximally beefed up 1/2 ton or or a 3/4 truck as a TV. I am wanting one that can function as a daily driver as well and has the dependability of a Toyota. Max weight for my trailer is supposedly 10k lbs, and the max Tundra towing capability I can find is 10,200 lbs. That seems a little too close for comfort for a responsible tow. Once I do start travelling with my trailer, it might be a handful of times a year and I would take my 3 kids with me (ages 4-12). In light of what the OP and thread is discussing, does anyone here have advice for me regarding a Tundra setup that might work? Or, is there a different beefed up 1/2 ton that might make sense (i.e. the Nissan Titan, F150 twin turbo with tow package, etc.), or should I just spring for a 3/4 ton and eat the extra fuel costs as a daily driver?
Hi. I have a couple of thoughts that might be helpful:

1) Rated tow capacity vs payload. I started out focusing on rated towing capacity only. This was a mistake because rated tow capacity is rarely the limiting factor. Most of the time it’s payload. Here’s why: Airstreams generally have really high hitch weights. 900 lbs on my 28 RBT. I measured 800 lbs on my 23D. This weight counts against your payload. Then do the math. Most 1/2 ton pickups have 1300-1500 lb payloads. Subtract your tongue weight, weight of passengers and cargo. You most likely used up all or more of your payload. Then you’re exceeding the max GVWR.

2) Other than going to a heavy duty truck, one option is an F150 with the max tow package. I understand they’re really hard to find and may need to be special ordered. I’ve been told that vehicle has about 2000 lb payload. Do your own research on this as I am relying on what I’ve been told.

3) look at the stickers in the driver side door jamb for GVWR, GCWR, GAWR’s. Don’t take anyone else’s (car salesmen) word for it. If not already, get yourself familiar with these figures. Google.

4) Next time out when you’re fully loaded for camping (wife, kids, pets, gear) take a side trip to a CAT scale to see how everything weighs out. For about $13 you’ll see the loading on the front axle, rear axle and trailer axles.

I’m a really big Toyota fan and wish they offered a max tow package (increased GVWR) on the Tundra. Or better yet, a 3/4 ton Toyota pickup would be nice. That not being the case, I’m forced to look elsewhere.

I hope that helps.

Jim
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Old 04-12-2020, 04:28 PM   #57
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Tundra 5.7 sweet spot

In regard to mileage, Iíve an 07 4wd 5.7 tundra and we pull an sob weighing 5700lbs. I drive not so much by the speedometer but rather I use the tachometer. Iíve learned that on my truck there is a sweet between 1600 and 1800 more or less and when weíre in it, I can get 13+ mpg on a regular basis. That rpm usually gives me about 60 mph which is fine with me and you know who.
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Old 04-12-2020, 05:49 PM   #58
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I installed a replacement fuel tank that extended my fuel to 46g, and could generally get 350 miles. (When fueling make sure you have 2 credit cards, as the pump shuts off at $100 - most fuel stops)

Too bad, as it isn't that I want to tow for hours, and hours, it's been my experience that you might need that extra distance on the occasion when there are no reasonable fuel stops where you are traveling. An extra 100 to 250 miles comes in handy in selecting where to get your fuel.


Transferflow.com is where I obtained the auxiliary tank. I'm not sure I would need one with the Tundra today using 32g tanks.
Great option but it does reduce the payload by a couple of hundred pounds, Therein lies the limitation with Tundra's. My wife's Lexus GX460 has more payload capacity than our 2010 Tundra. A couple of people, dog, topper, BBQ, few tools and misc. trailer accessories, add the hitch weight and we are over the payload capacity.
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Old 04-13-2020, 07:02 AM   #59
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Others have said this as well, but we really like our tundra! Itís a 2015 crewmax and itís been serviced regularly by yours truly. We just put new brakes on and went the cryo route. Really great choice IMO! Iím planning on putting timbren rubber springs in the rear to help with the ride while towing our 31í airstream. Hereís a picture from last year, weíre still restoring the rig. Cheers! Oh, had a silverado HD before this and the electrical issues were really dangerous
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Old 04-13-2020, 07:49 AM   #60
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Yep!

When I was shopping for a TV I had to give Ford a shot. Was looking at the F150 with Ecoboost/turbo. I expressed my concern over the Ecoboost and engine life and was assured by the Ford salesman they can get up to 100,000 miles! I actually laughed out loud!

Went with the Tundra TRD 4x4 Double Cab. Dropped a Flip 4 tonneau cover on it which was the best upgrade! I still have a scar on my head from crawling in the bed with a shell. Now I just roll that thing up and walk back to the box I need gear out of.
Why did you have a concern about the EB engine life? I mean, many of the first genration have well over 150K+ miles and still working fine...and, really, the Toyota's have a "reputation" (as do others) https://www.carcomplaints.com/Toyota/Tundra/engine/
The Toyota's and RAM's also, are notorious for having very small payload numbers, unless ordered special... Just saying, they all have some kind of bad rap when you think about it...or we would all be driving the same brand!
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