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Old 09-05-2018, 03:21 PM   #1
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Cummins Diesel Engine

Several days ago I traded my RAM 1500 for a RAM 2500 with a Cummins. My first ever diesel!

I noticed the coolant temperature runs about 190 degrees and the oil temperature is about 200 degrees. Both of these temperature are 15 to 20 degrees cooler than the 5.7 hemi in my 1500. These readings are taken after driving for over an hour in mid 90 ambient temperature. Also, this is truck only with nothing being towed.

Also oil pressure is less by about 10 PSI as compared to the hemi.

Of course the hemi ran at higher RPM's generally speaking.

I was surprised that the temps. would be lower. I guess this is normal. Just trying to understand this new beast I have under the hood!
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Old 09-05-2018, 05:53 PM   #2
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I would put it to work, and enjoy it.

A bumper sticker from Geno's Garage www.tdr1.com was Load the wagon, don't worry about the mule.

Enjoy it you're running a completely different powertrain.
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Old 09-05-2018, 06:19 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hans627 View Post
Several days ago I traded my RAM 1500 for a RAM 2500 with a Cummins. My first ever diesel!

I noticed the coolant temperature runs about 190 degrees and the oil temperature is about 200 degrees. Both of these temperature are 15 to 20 degrees cooler than the 5.7 hemi in my 1500. These readings are taken after driving for over an hour in mid 90 ambient temperature. Also, this is truck only with nothing being towed.

Also oil pressure is less by about 10 PSI as compared to the hemi.

Of course the hemi ran at higher RPM's generally speaking.

I was surprised that the temps. would be lower. I guess this is normal. Just trying to understand this new beast I have under the hood!
The 2500 RAM is a hearty beast. We replaced a 2012 1500 Hemi with a 2016 2500. Best move we could have made. I recall always being conscious of many of the gauges while towing with the 1500.

Remember to pay attention to the DEF gauge in your 2500. You don't want to get below 1/4 DEF level, especially in the Yukon (an example of an isolated location). Always use MoPar DEF and keep the receipts in the truck. If you get caught out with a DEF alarm or limp home situation, you'll want to be able to prove to the dealer and FCA reps that you used MoPar DEF.
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Old 09-05-2018, 06:33 PM   #4
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Diesel trucks tend to have large radiators and cooling systems. Pretty hard to overheat one. Unlike the notorious Rabbit diesels that only held 3 quarts of coolant.
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Old 09-06-2018, 07:21 AM   #5
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The 2500 RAM is a hearty beast. We replaced a 2012 1500 Hemi with a 2016 2500. Best move we could have made. I recall always being conscious of many of the gauges while towing with the 1500.



Remember to pay attention to the DEF gauge in your 2500. You don't want to get below 1/4 DEF level, especially in the Yukon (an example of an isolated location). Always use MoPar DEF and keep the receipts in the truck. If you get caught out with a DEF alarm or limp home situation, you'll want to be able to prove to the dealer and FCA reps that you used MoPar DEF.


As a former automobile dealer for 39 years, I can tell you there is no need to run the ridiculously expensive MoPar DEF. It is not a requirement of the manufacturer. It may be “recommended” in the owner’s manual, but they want to sell you their expensive brand. Anything in a box, including the Blue DEF you find at auto parts stores is more expensive than filling your DEF tank at a gas station that offers bulk DEF, such as many Flying J’s, Love’s, TA’s, etc. I have a 2016 2500 Cummins, never used MoPar DEF and never would. Best price you can usually find on the box of Blue DEF is between $11.99 and $12.99 for the 2.5 gallon box. That’s roughly $4.80 to $5.20 per gallon. Bulk DEF at the stations mentioned above runs about $2.89 per gallon. Pretty significant savings and way more convenient to fill up your DEF tank at the same time you are filling your fuel tank. No hauling the boxes around, no spilling the fluid on your shiny new truck and no box to dispose of.
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Old 09-06-2018, 08:15 AM   #6
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I'll second the above post. Having worked as a cummins tech for years there was never a mention of what type of DEF people should be putting In their vehicles. DEF is basically urea and water. It gets injected into an exhaust catalyst and reduces nitros oxide.
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Old 09-06-2018, 01:05 PM   #7
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The engine coolant temperature in my 2009 Dodge Cummins rarely gets over 200 degrees when pulling the steepest grades. It is nice to have a well designed cooling system.
DEF - My truck is outside of the years that use DEF fluid. From my reading I think the biggest issue with DEF is that heat can shorten the shelf life and can go bad.


Here are two good forums for your pickup.
https://www.turbodieselregister.com/forums/


https://www.cumminsforum.com/forum/
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Old 09-06-2018, 02:02 PM   #8
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Thanks for the input, suggestions and links.

The other day I drive thru a truck stop with diesel and DEF at the pump. I could not figure out how to activate it. The pump did not take credit cards. But I didn't take the time to figure it out as I was there to weight the truck.

Do others use the truck stops for fueling and DEF?
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Old 09-06-2018, 02:23 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crispyboy View Post
The engine coolant temperature in my 2009 Dodge Cummins rarely gets over 200 degrees when pulling the steepest grades. It is nice to have a well designed cooling system.
DEF - My truck is outside of the years that use DEF fluid. From my reading I think the biggest issue with DEF is that heat can shorten the shelf life and can go bad.


Here are two good forums for your pickup.
https://www.turbodieselregister.com/forums/


https://www.cumminsforum.com/forum/
My RAM/Mopar parts guy showed me the chart posted in their parts room that indicated the maximum storage temperature for DEF. 85 degrees F is the max. My dealer is careful about storing it below 85.

I've seen fuel stations/quick stops with their DEF stock stacked in their front windows, in the sun.

My 2005 RAM/Sprinter diesel (non-DEF) went into limp home mode twice. It's no picnic. I'm perfectly willing to pay MoPar's price and potentially avoid a delayed trip and the consequences of costly repairs.
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Old 09-06-2018, 03:14 PM   #10
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I've never used a DEF pump while traveling so can't speak for them but when at home I fill up at a local place that has DEF at the pump and it works easily. I pump the diesel fuel first then after the spout is secured I access the DEF spout and fill up. Can't use them both at the same time. A full tank is good for more than 5000 miles in my Ford F-350 and if I need more then I'd pick up some and add it myself.
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Old 09-06-2018, 03:57 PM   #11
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The trouble with emissions systems on modern Diesel's is that they fail. Repairing emission related failures is a daily occurrence in a modern shop. It's something you have to accept when you buy a modern diesel.

If you're traveling long distances often, then having a code reader that will reset emissions faults is a handy tool to get you out of a de rate situation. Avoiding idle time is another big saver to the health of your DPF, which is another source of the most common emissions failure.
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Old 09-06-2018, 08:31 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hans627 View Post
Several days ago I traded my RAM 1500 for a RAM 2500 with a Cummins. My first ever diesel!

I noticed the coolant temperature runs about 190 degrees and the oil temperature is about 200 degrees. Both of these temperature are 15 to 20 degrees cooler than the 5.7 hemi in my 1500. These readings are taken after driving for over an hour in mid 90 ambient temperature. Also, this is truck only with nothing being towed.

Also oil pressure is less by about 10 PSI as compared to the hemi.

Of course the hemi ran at higher RPM's generally speaking.

I was surprised that the temps. would be lower. I guess this is normal. Just trying to understand this new beast I have under the hood!
Without a load on the hitch or in the bed your Cummins is just loafing along hardly working and generating no real heat. Towing heavy you can see the temp slightly move and the fan clutch kick in. The oil pressure in my 2011 is a little bit above 40psi all the time. It never seems to move! I have towed lots of miles with my Ram 2500 and LOVE it. The airstream isn't there when towing it's so light :-)
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