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Old 03-27-2021, 08:28 AM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DCPAS View Post
One more thought in case you like adaptive cruise control. Some posts here have suggested that the adaptive part is disabled on GM products when in tow mode. It works in Ford products. Don't know about other brands.
Can confirm that ACC It works on my RAM 2500 Diesel. It intelligently uses both the engine brake and the trailer brakes (you can configure the dash to show you real time trailer brake actuation, which is how I confirmed this)
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Old 03-27-2021, 08:33 AM   #22
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My 2019 RAM 2500 Limited (Diesel) does the same.
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Old 03-27-2021, 08:38 AM   #23
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Went though this equation and countless posts several times. Picking up my FC25 FBQ next week. Going with RAM2500 to just “hitch it and forget it”.
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Old 03-27-2021, 08:46 AM   #24
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You will love it. Great choice. I’ve got a Classic 33 and I don’t even realize it’s behind me most of the time. I find myself driving that to work most days instead of my DD - just really like the interior & ride.
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Old 03-27-2021, 08:49 AM   #25
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Greetings from the Florida Panhandle

I won't make any recommendations for a tow vehicle for your Airstream. Instead, I will share with you our extensive experience pulling an Airstream 25FB.

We have been avid Airstreamers for fifteen years. We have had two 25FB's, a 2005 and a 2015. We have towed these a total of 200,000 miles. We have 2,218 nights of Airstream camping. We have traveled with our Airstreams in all of the lower 48 States, Alaska, and most of the Canadian Provinces.

Over the years, we have had several tow vehicles. They were a 2004 Suburban 2500, a 2005 Suburban 2500, a 2011 Silverado 3500, a 2018 Silverado 2500, and a 2020 Silverado 2500. The Suburbans were powered by GM's 6.0 Liter gasoline engines. Our Silverados have all been powered by GM's Duramax Diesel engines.

The 3/4 ton Suburbans were adequate tow vehicle and did a good job in most circumstances. They were a little on the weak side when it came to long 7% upgrades. It was not uncommon for us to have to travel in the slow truck lane on these upgrades. Severe downgrades could get a little dicey also. There were several instances where I did not feel fully in control, and the brakes had to be ridden fairly hard. I refer to this experience as "the runaway train syndrome", and it is quite unnerving.

You should also be aware that 3/4 ton Suburbans were discontinued for public purchase several years ago. They are still produced, but only for law enforcement agencies.

In 2011 we decided to go Diesel with a Silverado 3500. The reason we went with the one ton was that were were also carrying a 3,000# truck camper in the bed on the truck while towing the Airstream. We ultimately decided that the truck camper was more trouble than it was worth and sold it in 2017. In 2018, we went with a 3/4 ton Silverado, and stayed with the diesel engine. We had been thoroughly spoiled by the diesel towing performance. Even when towing the Airstream, these diesel trucks can outperform most sedans on the severe upgrades. These diesel trucks also perform very well on the significant downgrades. The diesel exhaust brake keeps the rig at a comfortable speed. I rarely have to use the vehicle brakes on these downgrades. We have become diesel aficionados.

Last year we traded our 2018 Silverado for a 2020. The reason that we traded so soon was to get the new GM camera system that was introduced in 2020. The 2018 had only 65,000 miles on it, but we were lured into trading to get the transparent trailer camera that had became available in the 2020 models.

Please excuse my long-windedness in sharing this information. I hope that you can find it useful in making your decision. Best wishes in your future Airstream Adventures.

Brian
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Old 03-27-2021, 09:14 AM   #26
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Hi

Of all the things tossed around, gas vs diesel is one decision you will have to make. The gas drivetrain is *much* lighter. That gives you more "payload" (whatever you want to call it) for a given make / model / size of truck. A lot of the "bump up" (F150 to F250) gets done when diesel is added. In some cases folks decide on diesel simply to use the truck lanes to fill up ....

If indeed there is only one of you and absolutely all your stuff will fit in the AS, sure, you can get a much smaller TV than the rest of us. This is not just a weight issue, there is a finite amount of storage volume in the trailer. Also consider that full water tanks will add about 800 pounds to the trailer. Will you ever travel that way? Who knows .....

Most seem to have a couple people involved, a dog or two, and maybe a few toys as well. Simply loading tools / spares / food / generator for a "couple of months" trip adds a *lot* of weight to the truck. You can't put a whole lot in a typical AS.

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Old 03-27-2021, 09:30 AM   #27
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IMHO your trailer is on the dividing line where a 1/2 ton or 3/4 ton can pull it efficiently. The 3/4 ton will do it effortlessly and be better on mountain grades (or higher elevations) and if you have heavy things in the truck itself (ATV or dirt bikes, generator(s), firewood, 4 person's luggage, etc.

Would recommend you avoid a small or mid-sized SUV type of tow vehicle though...even if it has enough towing capacity the weight of that size trailer can swing the vehicle - tail wagging the dog.
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Old 03-27-2021, 09:34 AM   #28
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First, all of the above posts are correct. I also have a 25 FBQ and agonized over the decision on the best truck for the job. A 3/4 or 1 ton truck is heavier than a half ton and will feel more secure when towing the trailer BUT they're bigger and much stiffer trucks and their unloaded ride is much rougher than a half ton. I ended up going with an F-150 with the max tow package and the 3.5 Ecoboost as my TV and am happy with the decision. I've put a good 30k miles on the rig towing my AS all over the East Coast and Rockies with no issues. The Ecoboost outperforms gas V-8's especially in the mountains due to the turbo boost. It's not a 3/4 ton diesel but its also my daily driver, has a comfortable ride and fits in my garage. IF I were a full-time RV'r, I would have probably gone with the 3/4 ton. The bottom line is pick the truck that best meets your total need.
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Old 03-27-2021, 09:50 AM   #29
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Lots of potatoes and potatoes you can tow with a bicycle but IMHO you need to do your own research and also do the math (towing capacity, hitch weight, cargo capacity etc) here is an example of what I went through ... how-to-determine-if-your-tow-vehicle-is-right-for-your-trailer/ IMHO you need to do the work to be safe and sure...
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Old 03-27-2021, 09:55 AM   #30
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Been there done that

Pulled our 26 with a 150. Not bad till 18 wheelers snuck up and sucked you in. Coyote V8 was pretty strong. Changed to 250 superduty diesel. World of difference. Never moves when an 18 blows by. No slowing down up a mountain. Accelerates on the highway no problem. Fuel mileage is way better than gasoline. And if you get a fleet card you can go through the truck lanes and get better prices on fuel.

Get a super duty.
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Old 03-27-2021, 10:26 AM   #31
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Tow Vehicle, Daily Driver, ???

If you're going to be using this vehicle as a "daily driver" (say, for commuting to work or shopping or visiting family and friends) a 3/4-ton or bigger truck is going to ride rougher than a 1/2-ton. And, sure many 1/2-ton trucks are closer to 5/8-ton trucks with more horsepower and a stronger suspension.

I lived between Longmont and Loveland when we first bought our 28 ft AS (rear bedroom). A friend had nearly the exact same trailer and raved about towing it with his Toyota Tundra. So, I went and bought a Toyota Tundra. I LOVED that truck--for daily driving, and for towing on mostly level roads. The wife LOVED that truck; our dogs LOVED that truck.

But the first time my wife saw me white-knuckling it down a grade in Western Colorado (two lane road with lots of curves and a couple of switchbacks) she said, "I think it's time you look for another truck."

Good acceleration, even when at 60+ MPH. And, it could handle most mountain ascents. It was the descents that I didn't like. I used the manual brake feature of my brake controller AND shifted down to a lower gear when negotiating steep downhills, but I still felt like I was near the edge of getting pushed by the trailer. We didn't have that much gear in the back of the truck (it had a rigid tonneau cover and a short bed), and the trailer wasn't overly loaded.

I never experienced any sway when passing or getting padded by trucks Equalizer hitch).

But, it was the brakes. I didn't feel like I had enough brakes for a long downhill grade--especially if I got stuck behind cars/trucks which were going really slow, and had to use every "tool" at my disposal to keep from over-using my truck's brakes so that I would have them if I needed them.

I started looking for a 3/4-ton truck, and because I was buying late-model and previously-owned I found a 1-ton (RAM 3500) which had the RAMBOXES and I wanted them (and am very glad I have them!). Also, kind of limits what I can put in the bed (because it's narrower) under a rigid tonneau cover, so I'm nowhere near the truck's payload limits (wouldn't have been with a 2500, either--but none were available when I was looking).

When Toyota comes out with a diesel, I will FIGHT to get to the head of the line. That was a FINE truck. And, if I was traveling mostly East of the Rockies, it would be more than adequate. But, we lived in Colorado, and we LOVE the Western US, and it just wasn't the truck for our purposes.

I didn't know if I'd like the diesel, but, as you probably guessed--I'm not going back to gas. Plenty of torque; not that much difference in fuel mileage between the two (it's better if I keep my speed below 65 MPH, but that's hard sometimes--okay, most of the time!) Other than the cost of filter changes (which I do myself for 15% of the total cost at the dealership, 35% of the cost at an oil change place), I'm happy. Haven't had problems with diesel smells on my hands or shoes (stinking up the cab).

The 3500 rides like, ..., well, ..., a truck. A 1-ton truck. It's not fun as a daily driver. (The wife always says, "It rides GREAT when we're towing!" and it does.) But, as a daily driver, it's a beast. Difficult to park, as well. Another consideration when choosing a two vehicle, especially if you're going to be using it a lot for non-towing purposes.

As nice as the amenities are in the RAM, I liked the Toyota more from a comfort standpoint. It was a Platinum edition, so it had all the bells and whistles. And, it was fun to drive--except when towing downhill on steep grades, especially two-lane roads. It's like learning to roller skate or ski or skiboard--the stopping is more important than the going!!! I just wanted more truck for braking--and the 1-ton (3500) has it in spades. Engine brake; big disc brakes. And, acceleration when it's needed, too--around Chicago or Cleveland I was GLAD I had it several times!

So, consider where you'll be doing most of your towing, if you'll be using it as a "daily driver," and the maintenance aspect (diesels require more maintenance (cost) as well as purchase price). And, if you're towing, the payload (how many passengers, pets, gear (generator(s), firewood, tools, pop-up shade tents, kayaks, bikes, etc.). If you're going to be using the vehicle for more than just towing, there are other considerations (ride; size; fuel; etc.).

Welcome to the forums!

[One more thing, I bought both my trucks from CarMax. 7 days to decide if I liked the vehicles (I SHOULD HAVE towed the trailer all seven days over mountains and different terrain!). They gave me the full purchase price when I traded in the Toyota on the RAM more than six months later. Low mileage vehicles (both), very clean, well taken care of. Decent price and I didn't have to drive all over and make appointments with private sellers. All makes and models to choose from in one place. There are other similar companies. Just a suggestion, if you're not buying new. I won't be buying too many more vehicles in my lifetime, probably (they last a lot longer than they did when I was much younger!) but this is now my preferred method of car buying, and I avoid the depreciation of a new car.]
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Old 03-27-2021, 10:53 AM   #32
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2020 Ram 1500 limited Hemi. Tows our 2018 25FT FBT beautifully.
Entering an exit so easy even for a petite person.
Due to the Tuckaway Runningboard amazing. This is just one gals opinion who never was interested in having a truck.
12,050 towing capacity.
1045 tongue weight.
12 inch screen.
Beautiful leather upholstery.
Shocks for a beautiful ride.
All the bells and whistle‘s of any luxury SUV. Airstream being the most luxurious travel trailer we wanted to pair it with something of equal luxury.
45 inches legroom in the backseat.
Backseat also reclines, heated seats front and back.
Six outing since we purchased this truck .
Maximum steel color we chose. Five other colors to choose from.
They also have a limited additions for each military branch. Thank you Dodge for honoring our veterans.
We both can highly recommend this truck. The trucks of today most certainly are not the trucks of our parents. Have fun searching for your new TV.
Congratulations on purchasing your Airstream. Airstream‘s are fabulous . The real silver lining is the people you’ll meet on this journey. Let the adventure begin. Start planning your first adventures. See you down the road.
Safe travel .
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Old 03-27-2021, 10:58 AM   #33
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Originally Posted by Gibson3798 View Post
I started not that long ago with a 1/2 ton Tundra pulling a 25 ft FB. When I felt it start pushing my truck on steep grades, I knew I was skirting the limits of its capabilities. Yes, it would be fine in KS or FL but the mountains were calling.

With a great trade, consummated on AS forum, a RAM 2500 Diesel owner and I traded trucks. He was getting out of towing and wanted the Tundra.

After towing through the Rockies, I was expressly glad I wasn’t hooked up to the 1/2 ton Tundra. The engine braking and stability of the heavier truck created a much more confident environment.

Now, it doesn’t handle like a smaller truck, so if that’s your goal, get a 1/2 ton truck. If you want safety, stability, and increased piece of mind in all situations while towing, get the bigger TV.
Exactly!
Thanks for helping new to towing people.
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Old 03-27-2021, 11:02 AM   #34
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As a fellow Colorado member, who has driven the I-70 corridor through the Eisenhower Tunnel and Vail Pass several hundred times without a camper and several times with my 27FB, I can say you will really appreciate a 3/4 ton diesel. Rolling down the west side of the Eisenhower Tunnel to Dillon and only requiring the exhaust break is a blissful experience. The unfettered climb up either pass gives confidence as well.

Some people like a 3/4 ton as a daily driver. If you have parking space at home and don't mind parking a ways out in the lot, you can manage it in Littleton. I do not use my 2020 RAM 2500 Diesel as a daily driver. I use it for towing my side-by-side ATV, the 27FB, and long inter-state journeys.

The diesel mileage and fuel cost is better than gas fueled trucks. I've been getting 14 mpg pulling the 27FB at 65 mph and 13 mpg during limited intervals at 72 mph. The camper pulls so nice, it's hard not to drive 72 mph when the speed limit is 80.

One slight drawback of a diesel is finding convenient DEF at the pumps. DEF is easy to find in the 2.5 gallon boxes. The boxes are much more expensive and a pain to fill the truck. The large truck stops will have DEF at the pumps. Of course, you have to mingle with the 18 wheelers to get it. This RAM has a 5 gallon DEF tank which is good for ~2000 miles. So, if you plan ahead it's not a problem, just a little nag at times.
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Old 03-27-2021, 11:07 AM   #35
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Originally Posted by DBHent View Post
Thank you all for your responses. I appreciate all your help. Hope to see you out there some day soon.
Me too!
One consideration is that my tow vehicle is also my daily driver. I take it to the grocery, doctor's, and hardware store. I don't want a stepladder to get in and out, and I didn't want a million dents because the truck took up every inch of a parking space.
I wanted a truck to last a long time with no major repairs.
So, I bought certified used Tundra, double cab, SR5 trim, 6.5' bed all to maximize payload. It has the tow package and the 5.7 engine.
It's pulled my 26'U flawlessly.
When I make the drive from Denver to Vail someday, I'll probably be in the slow lane. But then that will be 0.0001% of the truck's use.
The other 99.999% will be on flat or gently rolling land. It's a compromise I can live with.
(If you read enough threads here, you'll chuckle at the guy who says he drives 55 because it's safer, and then brags how his F-350 can fly up the mountains at 70!)

If bigger is better, then why not a F-650?
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Old 03-27-2021, 11:08 AM   #36
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Oh Boy! Nothing seems to ignite passions quite like 1/2 ton vs. larger more capable TVs. This seems like the main issue that splits this group right down the middle. This is where the forum morphs into a debate platform. No minds ever get changed.

We all offer our ideas and experience in hopes it will help the original poster. It's the OP's job to listen to all and decide for himself.

BTW, Put me down for the biggest most capable TV you can afford.

Good luck....and try not to hit the bear.
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Old 03-27-2021, 11:18 AM   #37
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Range of responses is consistent with all the other folks who have asked this question. You have a personalized situation that all of us usually cannot directly relate to. However, this Forum is an excellent source of ideas. I would offer a few other sources:
1. YouTube’s TFL Trucks and their towing tests on I-70 between Eisenhower Tunnel and Dillon, CO. They attempt to maintain the speed limit going up that long grade and often have it floored for the entire 8+ minutes to the summit.
2. YouTube’s Big Truck, Big RV - he reviews trailers, trucks and has videos on advice for making the half ton vs super duty decision.
3. RV parks - visit them and inquire of travel trailer owners why they picked their TV and how it is towing their particular trailer. At the Top of Georgia Airstream park we see all combinations towing all lengths, including a Infiniti version of the Nissan Armada towing a triple axle, 34 foot Exella (this owner LOVES his combination). I also like to mention that while performing the beloved Host responsibilities, I have seen both half tons and super duties pulling into the park having traveled downhill from Hiawassee with smoking brakes. This informed me that not only TV selection is important, but how to handle descents with trailer brakes, transmission and TV brakes in combination on both sides of the Mississippi.
4. Look at the range of the TV when towing planning about 10MPG. Bigger the tank, the more likelihood that you might not need to stop for fuel with the trailer behind you.
5. Half tons have max tow packages, what do they include: extra cooling, better brakes, better GRAWR? I would like to read about those folks who have ordered the Heavy Duty Payload Package (HDPP). What is their payload with that unique package I have NEVER seen on a Ford lot.
6. We were just introduced in the last few months to Buc-Cees gas stations/stores. Rule of Thumb amongst ALL my trailer towing friends is to not pass one by! They are huge and have fantastic room to maneuver your rig to the pump of your choice AND leave it parked at the pump while you go inside!!

Enjoy this part of the journey, and the follow-on questions that will arise as something breaks or does not work on you wonderful AS!

Reminder to everyone that Region 3 Rally is in Tallahassee at the end of April, where we can share more stories and obtain invaluable advice on our joint Airstream experience!
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Old 03-27-2021, 01:56 PM   #38
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Lots of experience here on this topic, for sure! We also have been towing AS's now for 17 years; 3 different 25' AS's; started with a new 2008 Tahoe; no power/payload, bought new 2011 Tahoe because it was supposed to have more HP and rear view camera for hook up... (30 more HP and camera was in the "mirror"...fell for the sales pitch!) Sold the 2011 Tahoe after one trip to Canada towing the 2008 25'; couldn't get up a steep grade past 45mph...bought a new 2012 F150 EB 4x4- towed real fine, except low payload and would heat up in hot weather going up steep grades at highway speeds...also, brakes heated up a few times gong down steep grades...When we purchased the 2017 new 28' FC few years back, I was looking at the new F150's...took one home and was really smitten with the 10speed and new engine design... but wife, (wisely) pushed me to the new 2017 F250 6.7L 4x4 King Ranch...114K miles now towing the 28' AS....love it! Engine brake, payload, power, comfort....not fun as a daily driver, but I didn't buy it for that. As you read above on previous comments, the 3/4T or 1T for towing larger AS's are a pleasure to drive while towing. Diesels also offer the extra power/engine brake and MPG vs gas. Big decision...glad we went diesel...hate to make the wrong decision! $$$
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Old 03-27-2021, 02:36 PM   #39
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Smile Hoping David is Correct!

Quote:
Originally Posted by DKB_SATX View Post
Payload is an important consideration, and somewhat misrepresented by pickup manufacturers. The payload numbers you see touted on their websites are for very specific configurations, the one you will be interested in is printed on a placard on the driver's side door post and is the ACTUAL payload for the specific truck.

If you take a lot of extra stuff with you in the back of the truck, or typically have 4 people in the cab plus a reasonable amount of stuff in the box, you can eat through payload quickly. The tongue weight of the Airstream counts against payload too.

For me, the numbers work for a 26' trailer (with possibly LOWER tongue weight than a 25', some of the 25' layouts have a pretty heavy tongue) and a carefully-specified F150 with the 3.5-liter Ecoboost. Some people don't want to think about weight when loading up and go straight to an HD pickup, but there are tradeoffs there too... if you're a Ford or RAM customer, going 4WD on an HD pickup gets you a solid front axle and all the handling compromises inherent in that. HD trucks are taller and heavier and generally longer, all of which has an effect on usability but they also tend to have much more payload capacity. If it's a vehicle you're buying almost exclusively as a tow rig then these considerations are less important and it's all about the towing capabilities, but if you're also driving this vehicle to work with a tight parking garage, etc. then you think about the compromises.
Hi--I've been lurking on Air Forums since purchasing 25ft FB Flying Cloud a few months ago. Embarrassed to admit, hadn't given a moments thought to payload until I started reading AirForums. The towing capacity on my Tundra was adequate so I thought I was ok. What a mistake. Of course, the trailer's tongue weight is much more than advertised in the specs. So with two passengers even a minimal amount of gear in the bed maxes our payload capacity.

I really don't want a ¾ ton for all the reasons listed by David and more--so just this week I special ordered an F150 with 3.5 Ecoboost, Max Tow and Heavy Duty Payload packages. I believe it will be more than adequate to tow the trailer and I know I'll enjoy it more when I'm not towing. Fingers crossed.

Jim
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Old 03-27-2021, 05:42 PM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UnklJoe View Post
If you're going to be using this vehicle as a "daily driver" (say, for commuting to work or shopping or visiting family and friends) a 3/4-ton or bigger truck is going to ride rougher than a 1/2-ton. And, sure many 1/2-ton trucks are closer to 5/8-ton trucks with more horsepower and a stronger suspension.

I lived between Longmont and Loveland when we first bought our 28 ft AS (rear bedroom). A friend had nearly the exact same trailer and raved about towing it with his Toyota Tundra. So, I went and bought a Toyota Tundra. I LOVED that truck--for daily driving, and for towing on mostly level roads. The wife LOVED that truck; our dogs LOVED that truck.

But the first time my wife saw me white-knuckling it down a grade in Western Colorado (two lane road with lots of curves and a couple of switchbacks) she said, "I think it's time you look for another truck."

Good acceleration, even when at 60+ MPH. And, it could handle most mountain ascents. It was the descents that I didn't like. I used the manual brake feature of my brake controller AND shifted down to a lower gear when negotiating steep downhills, but I still felt like I was near the edge of getting pushed by the trailer. We didn't have that much gear in the back of the truck (it had a rigid tonneau cover and a short bed), and the trailer wasn't overly loaded.

I never experienced any sway when passing or getting padded by trucks Equalizer hitch).

But, it was the brakes. I didn't feel like I had enough brakes for a long downhill grade--especially if I got stuck behind cars/trucks which were going really slow, and had to use every "tool" at my disposal to keep from over-using my truck's brakes so that I would have them if I needed them.

I started looking for a 3/4-ton truck, and because I was buying late-model and previously-owned I found a 1-ton (RAM 3500) which had the RAMBOXES and I wanted them (and am very glad I have them!). Also, kind of limits what I can put in the bed (because it's narrower) under a rigid tonneau cover, so I'm nowhere near the truck's payload limits (wouldn't have been with a 2500, either--but none were available when I was looking).

When Toyota comes out with a diesel, I will FIGHT to get to the head of the line. That was a FINE truck. And, if I was traveling mostly East of the Rockies, it would be more than adequate. But, we lived in Colorado, and we LOVE the Western US, and it just wasn't the truck for our purposes.

I didn't know if I'd like the diesel, but, as you probably guessed--I'm not going back to gas. Plenty of torque; not that much difference in fuel mileage between the two (it's better if I keep my speed below 65 MPH, but that's hard sometimes--okay, most of the time!) Other than the cost of filter changes (which I do myself for 15% of the total cost at the dealership, 35% of the cost at an oil change place), I'm happy. Haven't had problems with diesel smells on my hands or shoes (stinking up the cab).

The 3500 rides like, ..., well, ..., a truck. A 1-ton truck. It's not fun as a daily driver. (The wife always says, "It rides GREAT when we're towing!" and it does.) But, as a daily driver, it's a beast. Difficult to park, as well. Another consideration when choosing a two vehicle, especially if you're going to be using it a lot for non-towing purposes.

As nice as the amenities are in the RAM, I liked the Toyota more from a comfort standpoint. It was a Platinum edition, so it had all the bells and whistles. And, it was fun to drive--except when towing downhill on steep grades, especially two-lane roads. It's like learning to roller skate or ski or skiboard--the stopping is more important than the going!!! I just wanted more truck for braking--and the 1-ton (3500) has it in spades. Engine brake; big disc brakes. And, acceleration when it's needed, too--around Chicago or Cleveland I was GLAD I had it several times!

So, consider where you'll be doing most of your towing, if you'll be using it as a "daily driver," and the maintenance aspect (diesels require more maintenance (cost) as well as purchase price). And, if you're towing, the payload (how many passengers, pets, gear (generator(s), firewood, tools, pop-up shade tents, kayaks, bikes, etc.). If you're going to be using the vehicle for more than just towing, there are other considerations (ride; size; fuel; etc.).

Welcome to the forums!

[One more thing, I bought both my trucks from CarMax. 7 days to decide if I liked the vehicles (I SHOULD HAVE towed the trailer all seven days over mountains and different terrain!). They gave me the full purchase price when I traded in the Toyota on the RAM more than six months later. Low mileage vehicles (both), very clean, well taken care of. Decent price and I didn't have to drive all over and make appointments with private sellers. All makes and models to choose from in one place. There are other similar companies. Just a suggestion, if you're not buying new. I won't be buying too many more vehicles in my lifetime, probably (they last a lot longer than they did when I was much younger!) but this is now my preferred method of car buying, and I avoid the depreciation of a new car.]
Curious if you had the towing package with 4.3 diff?

My experience with the same motor and driveline tells a different story. I live in the west and primarily tow in and out of the Rockies. And tow a larger 27FB.

Brakes and stability when setup correctly are strong. The large 5.7L displacement iForce V8 is known for its strong engine braking, over many competitor smaller turbo motors.

Some other things that make all the world of difference is downshifting. Like many that are afraid to rev gas motors when climbing and suggest there is not enough power, max engine braking relies on revs.

Along with proper brake bias, I have had nothing but great stability and braking when towing a large AS in and around mountains.

Sure, an HD truck can perform better in some regards and compensating for other shortcomings.
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