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Old 03-29-2024, 06:04 AM   #1
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2024 Ford F-150 rear axle GAWR and curb weight

Hi folks,


We are replacing our 2012 Ford F-150 3.5L EcoBoost at 160k miles, which has done very well for us.


I have confirmed that a Ford F-150 4x2 SuperCrew XLT with the 3.55 max tow/haul axle has enough payload capacity for what we need at 2,080 pounds.


However, I still need to verify it has enough rear axle capacity. I would be able to get the Rear GAWR off the door label, although my dealer hasn't found a 2024 with those specs on the ground anywhere to look. And, even finding that, I have no idea how to get the curb weight without actually weighing the truck on scales.


In previous years (through 2021) the Ford eSourceBook had a table of all the options with their weights on the rear axle to add up and subtract from the rear GAWR for that cab/engine/axle combination to get the remaining capacity. That table doesn't exist in the 2024 eSourceBook (or my dealer and Ford Support can't find it).


Based on 2021 and 2023 numbers from those eSourceBooks we should be fine. However, I would like to confirm that before ordering the truck.



Any other suggestions are appreciated. Otherwise, we will order the truck we want and refuse delivery if it doesn't have the specs we need (which the dealer has agreed to).


Thanks in advance!
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Old 03-29-2024, 07:00 AM   #2
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Take the truck’s GVWR and subtract the cargo carrying capacity. That will get you very close to the weight of the truck as it left the factory.
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Old 04-01-2024, 05:34 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by barrettjl View Post
Hi folks,


We are replacing our 2012 Ford F-150 3.5L EcoBoost at 160k miles, which has done very well for us.


I have confirmed that a Ford F-150 4x2 SuperCrew XLT with the 3.55 max tow/haul axle has enough payload capacity for what we need at 2,080 pounds.

Based on 2021 and 2023 numbers from those eSourceBooks we should be fine. However, I would like to confirm that before ordering the truck.

Any other suggestions are appreciated. Otherwise, we will order the truck we want and refuse delivery if it doesn't have the specs we need (which the dealer has agreed to).
I think you'll be fine waiting for delivery and seeing the sticker on the door. Ford probably has no need to keep intricate details other than over-all numbers.

Did the Ecoboost motor start to get tired?
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Old 04-01-2024, 08:46 AM   #4
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If you have a VIN

https://www.ford.com/support/towing-calculator
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Old 04-01-2024, 06:32 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by JJTX View Post
I think you'll be fine waiting for delivery and seeing the sticker on the door. Ford probably has no need to keep intricate details other than over-all numbers.

Did the Ecoboost motor start to get tired?

Thanks JJTX. I think that's what we'll have to do.


The EcoBoost is a Generation 1 which had some well-documented problems. We've been extremely lucky and gotten 160k mostly-trouble-free miles out of it. We're going to replace it with a Generation 3 EcoBoost.
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Old 04-01-2024, 06:38 PM   #6
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Thanks trsvax.



Another useful site if you have the VIN to see the window sticker is https://www.windowsticker.forddirect...icker.pdf?vin=


I've been using both of those to see the payload (using the first site) and what options the truck has (using the second site) to compare with what we are planning on ordering.


Unfortunately neither of those gives axle weights, which is the other area a half-ton truck can run into trouble with a heavy Airstream hitch weight.
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Old 04-14-2024, 11:52 AM   #7
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Coyote

I bought a 2023 F150 2-wheel drive max tow for our new 23FBT. Got the coyote engine (V8). Great combination - here's the CAT scale ticket and some more info.
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Old 04-14-2024, 05:53 PM   #8
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I would move away from the ECO's (that require higher octane fuel and are problematic for towing). They are known for their exhaust manifold bolts shearing off and the turbo hoses failing (all documented on-line). I would move to the 5.0 V8. You'll sacrifice 0.5mpg and make up for in fuel savings and maintenance. The old saying, always buy displacement for towing applies here.
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Old 04-14-2024, 07:39 PM   #9
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Tossing in my 2˘, our Ecoboost runs well but the downhill compression is woefully inadequate. If I had to do it again, 5.0 Coyote. I'd take 8 cyl @12-1 vs 6 cyl @10-1 anyday.


Steve
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Old 04-15-2024, 05:29 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by barrettjl View Post
Thanks JJTX. I think that's what we'll have to do.


The EcoBoost is a Generation 1 which had some well-documented problems. We've been extremely lucky and gotten 160k mostly-trouble-free miles out of it. We're going to replace it with a Generation 3 EcoBoost.
Oh yes I remember reading about them. I'm surprised you got along as well as you did with that first generation.

As an 3.5 EB owner myself, what I notice from everyone on the planet that is NOT a dealer is, never let these motors go past 5K on oil change intervals, and always use full synthetic. I've had my truck since it had 32K on it and its 5K intervals period.

However, the only thing I would do different than you did, is I would replace the engine vs buying a new truck simply because of how much less expensive it is.

But theres nothing wrong with buying a whole new truck either, its just too expensive for me.
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Old 04-15-2024, 05:37 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by O-side Jimmy View Post
I would move away from the ECO's (that require higher octane fuel and are problematic for towing). They are known for their exhaust manifold bolts shearing off and the turbo hoses failing (all documented on-line). I would move to the 5.0 V8. You'll sacrifice 0.5mpg and make up for in fuel savings and maintenance. The old saying, always buy displacement for towing applies here.


Without changing the topic of this thread, there are always things that fail here and there however, the Ecoboost engines do - NOT - require high octane gas. Its simply a suggestion from Ford to achieve maximum power. The motor compensates for octane levels on its own and changes timming. It will NOT hurt the engine to run 87.

However that said, When I know i am pulling mountains in WY or CO or MT, I use mid grade and super so that it does reach its max power rating. But otherwise I use 87.

The Ecoboost engines have more power than the V8 ford puts in the F150. Last time I looked. And fuel prices and 'maint' are not a factor. I've done no " maintenance " due to having an Ecoboost motor that I didnt have on any other standard aspirated motor.

I believe a lot of what you read on forums and 'problems' with the EB motors is due to extended oil change intervals, isolated problems with any mechanical device and a bad part there or here, and abuse of the vehicle, towing excessively heavy loads and poor choices otherwise.

Gen 1 motors did have some initial problems when put in use on the road, but those were fixed relatively quickly. I have a 2015 and no problems.
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Old 04-15-2024, 05:42 AM   #12
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Tossing in my 2˘, our Ecoboost runs well but the downhill compression is woefully inadequate. If I had to do it again, 5.0 Coyote. I'd take 8 cyl @12-1 vs 6 cyl @10-1 anyday.


Steve

I wish ford would let me disable this in the options, permanently.

I did a brake job and installed drilled and slotted rotors on all 4 and heavy duty brakepads. I have no brake fade period.

The Ford engine braking configuration is useless on a gas engine.

I put the motor in manual shift mode when decending down mountain roads and use intelligent braking and reduce my speed and use the manual shift button to hold gears.

The concept of engine braking in a gas engine is badly programmed in the ford ECU and its highly highly over-aggressive.

The V8 has no better engine braking because, again its a gas engine.

Upgrade your brakes and your way better off. I would actually be quite surprised if Ford offered that coyote motor and any towing capacity over standard.
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Old 04-15-2024, 05:59 AM   #13
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Coyote Braking

We haven't been in the mountains yet but on smaller shorter inclines the Coyote braking seems good. After talking to the dealer about towing and fuel MoonBeam (it's white) runs on a diet of 100% regular.


Somewhere over a year when I was doing Eco vs. V8 there was a note that the V8 underhood temperature was about 20 degrees cooler that the Eco. Our old Sprinter had a turbo diesel and it was increasing expensive to maintain as the miles went by. The Coyote is a simpler engine that the Eco so maintenance after the warranty expires S/B less.


Ford recommends that the oil be changed every 4,000 miles of towing.
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Old 04-15-2024, 10:54 AM   #14
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I took my F-150 EB pulling our 7k trailer on I-70 west of Denver last fall. Engine braking was more than adequate driving with cruise control on and truck in tow mode.
I only use regular 87 octane. I tried using higher octanes and did not get enough added mileage to offset the additional price.

YMMV
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Old 04-15-2024, 03:03 PM   #15
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I took my F-150 EB pulling our 7k trailer on I-70 west of Denver last fall. Engine braking was more than adequate driving with cruise control on and truck in tow mode.
I only use regular 87 octane. I tried using higher octanes and did not get enough added mileage to offset the additional price.

YMMV
You shouldn't expect any significant increase in MPG with higher octane vs regular in an Ecoboost. Where it makes a difference is that the engine can run at higher boost pressure and spark advance without causing preignition, so the engine can produce more power. It's not night and day... Car & Driver (testing a 2019 F150) measured about a 6% gain in rear-wheel horsepower on a dynamometer, and actually did declare about 0.5 mpg gain at 75 mph (not worth the extra cost of super for the MPG obviously.) That probably short-changes the real-world difference, though, since delaying preignition on a steep climb on a hot day is a BIG DEAL.
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Old 04-16-2024, 11:44 AM   #16
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You shouldn't expect any significant increase in MPG with higher octane vs regular in an Ecoboost. Where it makes a difference is that the engine can run at higher boost pressure and spark advance without causing preignition, so the engine can produce more power. It's not night and day... Car & Driver (testing a 2019 F150) measured about a 6% gain in rear-wheel horsepower on a dynamometer, and actually did declare about 0.5 mpg gain at 75 mph (not worth the extra cost of super for the MPG obviously.) That probably short-changes the real-world difference, though, since delaying preignition on a steep climb on a hot day is a BIG DEAL.
For me, it's not a big deal. How often does anyone do a steep climb on a hot day? On my trip, the truck comfortably maintained 65 MPH going up the grade out of Denver with only slightly above normal boost level being applied and I wasn't in 3rd gear to do it. I do watch the amount of boost being applied, following the mantra that you can have ECO or boost, but not at the same time, I recognize there are folks who like driving in high performance mode, that isn't me.
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Old 04-19-2024, 06:16 AM   #17
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I

I only use regular 87 octane. I tried using higher octanes and did not get enough added mileage to offset the additional price.

YMMV

It has no affect on millage. It's about power. The engine ECU detects the higher octane fuel and will change the timing to boost the power when under load, climbing hills. The engine is a complex variable valve timming system that needs 90+ to operate at its peak performance. Using 87 while pulling mtn roads will result in retarded timing and a noticeable reduction in power and engine strain.
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Old 04-19-2024, 06:18 AM   #18
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Ford recommends that the oil be changed every 4,000 miles of towing.

Thats nice to see finally. However, towing or not, that turbo in the EB engine is still being used for normal driving and should never exceed 5K.

I do 5K as it is a good balance between towing and normal driving. My truck is only used for towing the camper and occasional use otherwise, It is not a daily driver.
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Old 04-19-2024, 06:23 AM   #19
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For me, it's not a big deal. How often does anyone do a steep climb on a hot day? On my trip, the truck comfortably maintained 65 MPH going up the grade out of Denver with only slightly above normal boost level being applied and I wasn't in 3rd gear to do it. I do watch the amount of boost being applied, following the mantra that you can have ECO or boost, but not at the same time, I recognize there are folks who like driving in high performance mode, that isn't me.
Sport mode while connected to a heavy load is probably not a good idea. And, I wonder if Ford does not override that when it knows theres a trailer and load connected.

For obvious reasons, I've never tried it, as it would seem to defeat the purpose of tow mode which prioritizes torque.

Even in Flat Texas, I use tow mode. Never sport, while connected. Once I hit Colorado WY MT I start using 89+ oct
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