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Old 12-06-2020, 06:37 PM   #81
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2018 20' Flying Cloud
Park City , Utah
Join Date: Mar 2019
Posts: 16
A Full-Time Mountain Winter in The Aluminum Tent 3!

Quote:
Originally Posted by OTRA15 View Post
Could you please detail what damage if any occurred from the freeze-ups, in your 20' with ducted heat? Our similar FC20 has the old non-ducted heat.

Thanks,

Luckily there wasn’t any damage. The plumbing run to/from the water heater froze. I suspect that’s because there is little way for hot air to get into the “step” under the dinette. I was able to point a space heater at it to thaw.
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Old 12-08-2020, 05:25 PM   #82
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2014 20' Flying Cloud
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Thanks for the update.
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Old 12-19-2020, 12:59 PM   #83
The Aluminum Tent 3
 
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2014 23' Flying Cloud
Park City , Utah
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 1,719
A Full-Time Mountain Winter in The Aluminum Tent 3!

Hi all, greetings from Arizona...screw that winter nonsense!
Just kidding. I'm still here and know I'm way behind on my reporting. I'll do a write-up here and then add a few posts with pics later.

This experience so far has been quite easy, much to my surprise. The low overnight temperature so far has been 1F, with most nights down in the low teens or high single digits. No issues, but there are some caveats. Here are some takeaways so far.

1. I'm a 'cold' sleeper, and set the thermostat to 45 degrees overnight. With a heated mattress pad I turn on before bed...it's like slipping in to a warm bath and is awesome. Then I turn it off and am good for the night. The furnace generally kicks on very early in the morning as the temp inside get to 45. That has been enough to prevent any plumbing freezups. Remember that most of the supply plumbing in the Airstream is above the floor, so 45 in the trailer is fine. There are a few cold spots in my 23d/cb like adjacent to the toilet were there is a hole in the floor that lets cold air up from the belly, which I have insulated to try to protect as much as possible. It does get colder in that spot.

2. I purchased a heated water hose and was going to wrap the hydrant with heat tape and insulation, and leave the water on full-time...but have not bothered yet. I have just been keeping my fresh tank full, and working off that. Using a heated water hose for full water hookup is just another 'choke point' that can cause issues...freeze-ups, tripped breaker, etc. Not having to worry about it is just easier to me. The RV Resort I'm in has very nice showers so I'm been using those, so my water needs are minimized in the trailer. I also use a standalone water softener because the water is so hard here, and having that installed outside would require much more effort/heating/insulating that unit as well as the hose. So for now, I just keep that in the shower to protect it from freezing, then take it outside every 2nd or third day when I refill my fresh tank. Not as easy as having full-time water, but really just 15 minutes every 2 or three days and no water supply freezing worries--so there is mental luxury in not having to be concerned about that.

3. After using the furnace for 10 or 15 minutes in the morning to heat the rig from 45 degrees up to the 60s, I switch to one of two electric heaters...I have a 750/1200 watt cube heater (that also looks like a fireplace ), and a 750/1200 watt oil filled heater. I generally use the oil filled all day to keep the trailer warm, and when I'm not there for safety reasons; and use the little space heater at night as I read or watch tv etc...it's like having a little fireplace which I like the vibe of. Keep in mind also that I get lots of sun during the day unless it's snowing, and with my positioning, a lot of solar gain through the windows. which is helpful. Generally, it's around 65 degrees inside during the day.

4. Based on my heating scenarios described, my propane lasts forever. I was going to add a 100# tank on my regulator, and use one of the stock 30s as the auto switchover, and then the other 30 as a backup...but haven't bothered with that either. I topped up October 24 when it was going down to 8 degrees. A 30# tank lasted until November 23...more than four weeks! Today is December 19 and I am STILL working on that first tank, and it's been a cold month. It must be nearly empty by now!


5. Electricity. The RV Park meters monthly and charges for electricity, 13 cents per Kilowatt hour. that compares to 8 or 9 cents charged to residential customers. But anyway. I moved spots November 9 so they read the meter then, and again on December 15, for five weeks usage. I used 749kwh, for $97.37. So that's about 20 kwh per day, $2.63 per day. The cost would go down if I used my propane furnace more, but I prefer the even electric heat during the day and evening, rather than the furnace kicking on and off all the time, plus when it does, it gets really warm inside, then is chilly by the time it kicks on again, etc. There are lots of variables, but my research also suggests that if you try to compare apples to apples with electric heat vs propane, they say to multiply the cost per kwh by about 20, and if that is less than the cost of propane, you're ahead. The resort charges 2.89 a gallon for propane, vs 20x.13 for my electrical calculation which is $2.60...so it 'seems' that electric is probably less costly to me. But in any case...like I said I prefer the quiet, even heat of electric anyway, and $97 for 5 weeks is not an issue for me :-)

6. Tanks. As noted earlier I am just working from the fresh tank, and take showers in their facilities which are quite nice. My grey tank is left open to drain. Black is closed of course but there is another caveat there. My toilet flush pedal broke a few weeks ago, so I was toilet-less while dometic sent a replacement under warranty (which took some pushing from my end). So I gave the black tank a good flush before removing the toilet, and covered the 'hole' while waiting for the new one. I therefore had to exclusively use the park facilities, which frankly...was another 'aha' moment. I put my new toilet in a week or so ago...and haven't used it! Just using the park facilities (and to be honest...a large plastic bottle for night-time needs ) I like to keep things simple, and another 'choke point' are the dump valves and dump plumbing that comes out under the belly, exposed to exterior temps. With the black valve closed, there would be liquid in the drain pipe and against the gate valve. I fear that freezing and possible breaking which would be a catastrophe...or at the very least, being frozen when I need to dump, so I'd need to mess with a hair dryer and all that. So I've decided...for now...it's just easier to leave the black tank empty, and leave the gray valve open...so there is no water in the exterior pipes or valves...so no freeze worries.

Having said all that, I do have heat tape that I was going to wrap on the dump pipes and valves, and then insulate...but frankly, I haven't bothered. One less complex issue to deal with.

7. Humidity. This is a biggy for winter RV use. Humidity is created from cooking, showering, damp clothes drying, and simply breathing. This leads do condensation on cold surfaces, mainly the windows, but also a few places on the interior skin. This then freezes up, and then thaws and can get into the walls, etc...leading to damage and mold. So humidity control is absolutely essential. Showering in the park facilities is a major help. When cooking, ALWAYS have the vent hood on and a ceiling vent cracked to get the humidity from the food and burning propane out of the trailer. And lastly, I have a dessicant-style dehumidifier that runs all night, and every morning I empty 30-40 oz of water from it...just my breathing (and my dog's) creates a lot of moisture. The dehumidifier is a game changer. I also have done some window modifications to eliminate condensation and ice on those. Read one.

8. Windows. Many people use the clear cellophane window insulating kits from Home Depot to provide an air barrier between the interior of the trailer and the glass. This provide an insulated window that prevents frost on the inside. Others use reflectix pressed into the window frames against the glass to provide a layer of insulation. I like sunlight, so I went a different route.

For my two big side picture windows and my bedroom window, I removed the screens, and used the frames as templates, and cut replacements using plexiglass. I then put weather stripping on them and installed them in place of the screens. So on those windows I now have insulated double panes, that do not frost up at ALL...and allow in glorious sunshine all day. This was a great winter mod for me. Interestingly, the front curve pano windows are thicker glass, and with the rock guard providing some air gap there....they simply do not steam up, and require no treatment at all. The center window which is thinner glass, also does not ice up...it seems that rock guard provides enough insulation to make it close to a double pane window as well.

Before doing the plexiglass windows. the side windows and bedroom windows would be covered with ice in the morning, even if I used Reflectix in them. Now, with the plexi, I don't have to bother with the Reflectix at all and I get no moisture on those windows.

I do have reflectix panels press-fit into the Fantastic Fan frames, and the skylight, just to minimize heat loss in those areas.

9. Skirting. I made and installed a skirt around the entire trailer. There are many ways to do this, from pink foam board and duct tape (effective but looks like crap), to custom made vinyl skirting (expensive--$1500). I instead made my own. I ordered used billboard vinyl (I didn't know that was a 'thing'!) which was under $70 for a 12' by 24' billboard. Mine was a grocery store billboard lol. The back is black, which is the side that faces out. I cut it to the correct width, and have three pieces going around the base of the trailer, completely enclosing the underside. I used snaps that I screwed the bases in to the aluminum belly under the lower rub rail, so they are not obtrusive. Around the wheel wells, I screwed them into the aluminum trim, so they are more visible there, but that's OK. Didn't screw into the exterior skin anywhere.

The snap kit I ordered (the most expensive part--$150 for 100 snaps) include the base and stainless screw, the 'cap' part with a 'pin' on it. You install the bases, then snap on the snaps, then put on the vinyl, pressing it so the pin comes through, and then install a button on top of that to complete the snap.

I then used 3/4" pvc to make an 'outline' of the trailer on the ground, and the skirting tucks under that, and then held in place with pvc pipe clamps. This optional step insures that the skirt will stay in place in high wind, and not flap at the bottom.

The result of skirting is that underneath the trailer is always 10-15 degrees warmer than exterior ambient. Pretty amazing really. This helps prevent freeze ups and keeps the floors and trailer warmer for sure.

There is much more to report and I'll ad photos but I'll close for now by adding that overall...this has been much easier than I thought! I expected I might struggle to stay warm and go through propane like crazy, and deal with freezeups and frosted windows and all that, but really it's been quite easy and very pleasant! And a couple of Airstream neighbors here for the winter as well! The one behind me is Jihong Tang from Airstream Addicts on Facebook if any of you are on there. It's great to meet people from the online AS community in real life, like I did Ronnie (GMFL) last year and create what hopefully will be lasting friendships!


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Old 12-19-2020, 03:06 PM   #84
The Aluminum Tent 3
 
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2014 23' Flying Cloud
Park City , Utah
Join Date: Aug 2015
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pcskier View Post
I topped up October 24 when it was going down to 8 degrees. A 30# tank lasted until November 23...more than four weeks! Today is December 19 and I am STILL working on that first tank, and it's been a cold month. It must be nearly empty by now!
To be more clear...I topped up October 24, a 30# tank lasted till November 23, when I had it refilled. It is that tank that is still going now, 3 1/2 weeks later!
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Old 12-19-2020, 03:16 PM   #85
The Aluminum Tent 3
 
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Park City , Utah
Join Date: Aug 2015
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OTRA15 View Post
With Park City's projected low temps of about 10 degrees Fahrenheit for December [see line graphs at the bottom]:

https://www.accuweather.com/en/us/pa...1178?year=2020

. . . curious to know how you are managing in the aluminum tent?

Thanks,
Peter sorry for the delay...have been a bit distracted and not getting on here! Just posted a long post about things so far. The low temp so far this month has been 1F overnight, quite a few in the single digits, and many in the teens. Day times, depending on sun, which we get a lot of, generally get in to the 30sh range, with some nice solar gain through the AS windows. So far so good, overall, I'm really enjoying it.
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Old 12-19-2020, 05:11 PM   #86
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2014 20' Flying Cloud
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Thanks for the updates and photos, glad it is working out!
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Old 12-19-2020, 10:36 PM   #87
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1995 34' Excella
Lynchburg , Virginia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pcskier View Post
Hi all, greetings from Arizona...screw that winter nonsense!
Just kidding. I'm still here and know I'm way behind on my reporting. I'll do a write-up here and then add a few posts with pics later.

This experience so far has been quite easy, much to my surprise. The low overnight temperature so far has been 1F, with most nights down in the low teens or high single digits. No issues, but there are some caveats. Here are some takeaways so far.

1. I'm a 'cold' sleeper, and set the thermostat to 45 degrees overnight. With a heated mattress pad I turn on before bed...it's like slipping in to a warm bath and is awesome. Then I turn it off and am good for the night. The furnace generally kicks on very early in the morning as the temp inside get to 45. That has been enough to prevent any plumbing freezups. Remember that most of the supply plumbing in the Airstream is above the floor, so 45 in the trailer is fine. There are a few cold spots in my 23d/cb like adjacent to the toilet were there is a hole in the floor that lets cold air up from the belly, which I have insulated to try to protect as much as possible. It does get colder in that spot.

2. I purchased a heated water hose and was going to wrap the hydrant with heat tape and insulation, and leave the water on full-time...but have not bothered yet. I have just been keeping my fresh tank full, and working off that. Using a heated water hose for full water hookup is just another 'choke point' that can cause issues...freeze-ups, tripped breaker, etc. Not having to worry about it is just easier to me. The RV Resort I'm in has very nice showers so I'm been using those, so my water needs are minimized in the trailer. I also use a standalone water softener because the water is so hard here, and having that installed outside would require much more effort/heating/insulating that unit as well as the hose. So for now, I just keep that in the shower to protect it from freezing, then take it outside every 2nd or third day when I refill my fresh tank. Not as easy as having full-time water, but really just 15 minutes every 2 or three days and no water supply freezing worries--so there is mental luxury in not having to be concerned about that.

3. After using the furnace for 10 or 15 minutes in the morning to heat the rig from 45 degrees up to the 60s, I switch to one of two electric heaters...I have a 750/1200 watt cube heater (that also looks like a fireplace ), and a 750/1200 watt oil filled heater. I generally use the oil filled all day to keep the trailer warm, and when I'm not there for safety reasons; and use the little space heater at night as I read or watch tv etc...it's like having a little fireplace which I like the vibe of. Keep in mind also that I get lots of sun during the day unless it's snowing, and with my positioning, a lot of solar gain through the windows. which is helpful. Generally, it's around 65 degrees inside during the day.

4. Based on my heating scenarios described, my propane lasts forever. I was going to add a 100# tank on my regulator, and use one of the stock 30s as the auto switchover, and then the other 30 as a backup...but haven't bothered with that either. I topped up October 24 when it was going down to 8 degrees. A 30# tank lasted until November 23...more than four weeks! Today is December 19 and I am STILL working on that first tank, and it's been a cold month. It must be nearly empty by now!


5. Electricity. The RV Park meters monthly and charges for electricity, 13 cents per Kilowatt hour. that compares to 8 or 9 cents charged to residential customers. But anyway. I moved spots November 9 so they read the meter then, and again on December 15, for five weeks usage. I used 749kwh, for $97.37. So that's about 20 kwh per day, $2.63 per day. The cost would go down if I used my propane furnace more, but I prefer the even electric heat during the day and evening, rather than the furnace kicking on and off all the time, plus when it does, it gets really warm inside, then is chilly by the time it kicks on again, etc. There are lots of variables, but my research also suggests that if you try to compare apples to apples with electric heat vs propane, they say to multiply the cost per kwh by about 20, and if that is less than the cost of propane, you're ahead. The resort charges 2.89 a gallon for propane, vs 20x.13 for my electrical calculation which is $2.60...so it 'seems' that electric is probably less costly to me. But in any case...like I said I prefer the quiet, even heat of electric anyway, and $97 for 5 weeks is not an issue for me :-)

6. Tanks. As noted earlier I am just working from the fresh tank, and take showers in their facilities which are quite nice. My grey tank is left open to drain. Black is closed of course but there is another caveat there. My toilet flush pedal broke a few weeks ago, so I was toilet-less while dometic sent a replacement under warranty (which took some pushing from my end). So I gave the black tank a good flush before removing the toilet, and covered the 'hole' while waiting for the new one. I therefore had to exclusively use the park facilities, which frankly...was another 'aha' moment. I put my new toilet in a week or so ago...and haven't used it! Just using the park facilities (and to be honest...a large plastic bottle for night-time needs ) I like to keep things simple, and another 'choke point' are the dump valves and dump plumbing that comes out under the belly, exposed to exterior temps. With the black valve closed, there would be liquid in the drain pipe and against the gate valve. I fear that freezing and possible breaking which would be a catastrophe...or at the very least, being frozen when I need to dump, so I'd need to mess with a hair dryer and all that. So I've decided...for now...it's just easier to leave the black tank empty, and leave the gray valve open...so there is no water in the exterior pipes or valves...so no freeze worries.

Having said all that, I do have heat tape that I was going to wrap on the dump pipes and valves, and then insulate...but frankly, I haven't bothered. One less complex issue to deal with.

7. Humidity. This is a biggy for winter RV use. Humidity is created from cooking, showering, damp clothes drying, and simply breathing. This leads do condensation on cold surfaces, mainly the windows, but also a few places on the interior skin. This then freezes up, and then thaws and can get into the walls, etc...leading to damage and mold. So humidity control is absolutely essential. Showering in the park facilities is a major help. When cooking, ALWAYS have the vent hood on and a ceiling vent cracked to get the humidity from the food and burning propane out of the trailer. And lastly, I have a dessicant-style dehumidifier that runs all night, and every morning I empty 30-40 oz of water from it...just my breathing (and my dog's) creates a lot of moisture. The dehumidifier is a game changer. I also have done some window modifications to eliminate condensation and ice on those. Read one.

8. Windows. Many people use the clear cellophane window insulating kits from Home Depot to provide an air barrier between the interior of the trailer and the glass. This provide an insulated window that prevents frost on the inside. Others use reflectix pressed into the window frames against the glass to provide a layer of insulation. I like sunlight, so I went a different route.

For my two big side picture windows and my bedroom window, I removed the screens, and used the frames as templates, and cut replacements using plexiglass. I then put weather stripping on them and installed them in place of the screens. So on those windows I now have insulated double panes, that do not frost up at ALL...and allow in glorious sunshine all day. This was a great winter mod for me. Interestingly, the front curve pano windows are thicker glass, and with the rock guard providing some air gap there....they simply do not steam up, and require no treatment at all. The center window which is thinner glass, also does not ice up...it seems that rock guard provides enough insulation to make it close to a double pane window as well.

Before doing the plexiglass windows. the side windows and bedroom windows would be covered with ice in the morning, even if I used Reflectix in them. Now, with the plexi, I don't have to bother with the Reflectix at all and I get no moisture on those windows.

I do have reflectix panels press-fit into the Fantastic Fan frames, and the skylight, just to minimize heat loss in those areas.

9. Skirting. I made and installed a skirt around the entire trailer. There are many ways to do this, from pink foam board and duct tape (effective but looks like crap), to custom made vinyl skirting (expensive--$1500). I instead made my own. I ordered used billboard vinyl (I didn't know that was a 'thing'!) which was under $70 for a 12' by 24' billboard. Mine was a grocery store billboard lol. The back is black, which is the side that faces out. I cut it to the correct width, and have three pieces going around the base of the trailer, completely enclosing the underside. I used snaps that I screwed the bases in to the aluminum belly under the lower rub rail, so they are not obtrusive. Around the wheel wells, I screwed them into the aluminum trim, so they are more visible there, but that's OK. Didn't screw into the exterior skin anywhere.

The snap kit I ordered (the most expensive part--$150 for 100 snaps) include the base and stainless screw, the 'cap' part with a 'pin' on it. You install the bases, then snap on the snaps, then put on the vinyl, pressing it so the pin comes through, and then install a button on top of that to complete the snap.

I then used 3/4" pvc to make an 'outline' of the trailer on the ground, and the skirting tucks under that, and then held in place with pvc pipe clamps. This optional step insures that the skirt will stay in place in high wind, and not flap at the bottom.

The result of skirting is that underneath the trailer is always 10-15 degrees warmer than exterior ambient. Pretty amazing really. This helps prevent freeze ups and keeps the floors and trailer warmer for sure.

There is much more to report and I'll ad photos but I'll close for now by adding that overall...this has been much easier than I thought! I expected I might struggle to stay warm and go through propane like crazy, and deal with freezeups and frosted windows and all that, but really it's been quite easy and very pleasant! And a couple of Airstream neighbors here for the winter as well! The one behind me is Jihong Tang from Airstream Addicts on Facebook if any of you are on there. It's great to meet people from the online AS community in real life, like I did Ronnie (GMFL) last year and create what hopefully will be lasting friendships!


Attachment 385138Attachment 385139Attachment 385140[ATTACH]385141[/Attachment 385143


pcskier- Thanks for the update. I like your kiss approach to dealing with some of the challenges of cold weather camping. I really like your skirting design and your plexiglass storm windows. Lots of great information provided.

Dan
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Old 12-20-2020, 06:04 AM   #88
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pcskier View Post
. . .
This experience so far has been quite easy, much to my surprise.
. . .
Thanks again for all the details and photos . . . well done indeed!

For the sake of others who might be considering a similar path through a winter encampment, could you please estimate the total time you have spent, and the material costs, for making this work? [including research, trips to get the materials, and installation time]

Tanks!
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Old 12-20-2020, 10:01 AM   #89
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2016 26' Flying Cloud
Guelph , Ontario
Join Date: Aug 2018
Posts: 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by pcskier View Post
8. Windows. Many people use the clear cellophane window insulating kits from Home Depot to provide an air barrier between the interior of the trailer and the glass. This provide an insulated window that prevents frost on the inside. Others use reflectix pressed into the window frames against the glass to provide a layer of insulation. I like sunlight, so I went a different route.

For my two big side picture windows and my bedroom window, I removed the screens, and used the frames as templates, and cut replacements using plexiglass. I then put weather stripping on them and installed them in place of the screens. So on those windows I now have insulated double panes, that do not frost up at ALL...and allow in glorious sunshine all day. This was a great winter mod for me. Interestingly, the front curve pano windows are thicker glass, and with the rock guard providing some air gap there....they simply do not steam up, and require no treatment at all. The center window which is thinner glass, also does not ice up...it seems that rock guard provides enough insulation to make it close to a double pane window as well.

Before doing the plexiglass windows. the side windows and bedroom windows would be covered with ice in the morning, even if I used Reflectix in them. Now, with the plexi, I don't have to bother with the Reflectix at all and I get no moisture on those windows.
Thank you very much for the update and pics, sounds like you are doing just fine! When you have moment could you post some pics of the plexiglass windows and skirting please and thanks?
Rich
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Old 12-21-2020, 07:04 PM   #90
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2021 23' Globetrotter
Somewherein , Pennsylvania
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The black skirt is a neat look!
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Old 01-04-2021, 12:38 PM   #91
The Aluminum Tent 3
 
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2014 23' Flying Cloud
Park City , Utah
Join Date: Aug 2015
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OTRA15 View Post
Thanks again for all the details and photos . . . well done indeed!

For the sake of others who might be considering a similar path through a winter encampment, could you please estimate the total time you have spent, and the material costs, for making this work? [including research, trips to get the materials, and installation time]

Tanks!
Hmmm. Cost-wise, my DIY skirt was around $250. That's for used billboard vinyl which was around $70, and then the snaps I but in a kit were expensive...$150.00. Then some pvc and clamps for the bottom frame to keep all that in place. My neighbor has a custom skirt made by a company out of SLC that is really a quality product, with little turnbuckles on the coach instead of snaps, top notch fit and finish, super easy to install and remove, folds up in a nice neat bag. My DIY is a little more difficult to install, so if I was not in place for the winter and moving around as some people do...I'd go the custom route. The one next door on a 25' Airstream was around $1,400...but like I said, a very high quality product.

The 4 x 8 lexan sheet that I used to make my 3 'storm windows' (in place of the window screens on three windows) was around $110 at HD. Then the weather stripping that goes between the lexan and the inner skin...$20 bucks or so.

I did buy a 25' heated water hose, which is $112 or so, from Camco, and some heat tape to protect the park hydrant for about $25...but I haven't used either, as I've just been refilling my fresh tank and using that to avoid the extra complication of heating the outside water supply. I might still do that though just for the fun of it

The Hypervent product under my mattress to prevent condensation under the mattress was about $80. Not cheap, but the best product out there. Then maybe $25 for a roll of residential insulation that I used to insulate the outer storage compartment under the bed platform, as well as other places I could get to in that area, such as over the plastic wheel well. Lastly, a couple rolls of reflectix, I put a layer under the bed platform, and a few other places.

Time-wise, hard to say. It's easy to surf the internet for ideas way more than necessary. So certainly 10 hours or more, once all the sessions are added together.
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Old 01-04-2021, 12:46 PM   #92
The Aluminum Tent 3
 
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Park City , Utah
Join Date: Aug 2015
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New Year Update.


Things are great! Lowest overnight temp so far has been 1º F.

I have a thermometer that measures inside, plus three additional sensors. I have one outside, one under the skirt, and one sitting just above the belly on the black tank where there also is some supply PEX. (The black tank on the 23d/cb is partially above the floor).

It's pretty amazing, the skirt (with no heater) keeps the temp under the trailer 10-15º warmer than the exterior temp. That helps keep the floors and belly warmer, obviously.

The sensor in the belly has gotten in the 30s, that's with the furnace set to 45 degrees at night (while I'm snug in bed with my heated mattress pad, which is totally comfortable for me.)

I have measured the temp of the fresh water tank by running the bathroom sink for a minute or two and measuring with a digital thermometer...lowest so far is 39 degrees.

Once I run the furnace for twenty minutes to warm up in the morning, a small electric heater keeps me comfortable (about 65º with outside temps in the 20s to low 30s) all day and until bedtime with no additional furnace use.

I'll do another post with more details about all this!
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Old 01-04-2021, 01:51 PM   #93
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Long Island , New York
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 14,710
Thanks for the updates . . . was hoping you would guess-timate the average daily "extra" labor it takes to enable your aluminum tent to make it through the winter.

Most Airstream "dreamers" who want to do this do not appreciate just what is required time-wise IMO. So be it I guess.

Thanks again for all the detail in Post #83.

Happy New Year to all!
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Old 01-04-2021, 02:40 PM   #94
The Aluminum Tent 3
 
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2014 23' Flying Cloud
Park City , Utah
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 1,719
Quote:
Originally Posted by OTRA15 View Post
Thanks for the updates . . . was hoping you would guess-timate the average daily "extra" labor it takes to enable your aluminum tent to make it through the winter.

Most Airstream "dreamers" who want to do this do not appreciate just what is required time-wise IMO. So be it I guess.

Thanks again for all the detail in Post #83.

Happy New Year to all!
Once all set up...no extra daily time is required. The upfront time was...a weekend probably? To make and install skirt, make my three plexi windows, various insulating nooks and crannies, etc.



On a daily basis, the only extra effort needed is I need to refill my fresh tank every couple days or so, which only takes a few minutes. Otherwise...no more time than summer camping!
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