RV News RVBusiness 2021 Top 10 RVs of the Year, plus 56 additional debuts and must-see units → ×
 


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 02-16-2021, 02:44 PM   #1
Rivet Master
 
daleyocum's Avatar
 
2018 25' Flying Cloud
Portland , Oregon
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 985
All electric kitchen...has anyone done it?

Thinking about going to an all-electric kitchen in our FC25 (excluding the fridge.). I'm looking for examples of things people have done.

Our current situation. We have a 2018 FC25 that I've added 600w of solar and 500ah of Lithium to along with a Victron Multiplus 3000 hybrid inverter. We already have used our propane cooktop, using a two burner portable induction cooktop instead. We've installed a full size microwave as well. We use the propane oven on rare occasions. We boondock frequently and carry a Honda 2000 generator but only have to use it when running the AC or if there are a LOT of cloudy days.

I'm considering removing the range and going to a built-in Breville countertop oven and building a recessed place for the induction cooktop in the counter. This would be similar to what the Wynn's have done on their boat https://www.gonewiththewynns.com/ele...f-grid-kitchen

I guess we'd carry a little camp stove in case there were multiple failures but there would need to be a lot of failures for that to come into play (we'd run straight from the generator if the Victron died.)

Has anyone done this and how did you do it?
daleyocum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2021, 03:31 PM   #2
Rivet Master
 
Lily&Me's Avatar

 
2007 Interstate
Normal , Illinois
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 16,404
I have two propane burners but only use them when I don’t have electricity.

I have a small electric coffee maker, hot pot, InstantPot and electric skillet.

If I had room, I might add a toaster oven.

Maggie
__________________
Find a need and fill it.

🏡 🚐 Cherish and appreciate those you love. This moment could be your last.🌹🐚
Lily&Me is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2021, 03:49 PM   #3
2 Rivet Member

 
2017 25' International
West Lake Hills , Texas
Join Date: Dec 2020
Posts: 42
Havenít done what youíre talking about, but...

We use our Breville countertop oven at home almost exclusively. The big Viking wall oven is a glorified kitchen timer. Well, it was until the timer stopped working.
Fungus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2021, 01:08 AM   #4
Rivet Master
 
daleyocum's Avatar
 
2018 25' Flying Cloud
Portland , Oregon
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 985
Quote:
Originally Posted by BarbBW View Post
This is an interesting idea I donít like cooking with propane. Is your idea that this would work boondocking? Stove burners seem to use 1000 to 3000 watts and a small oven about 2000 watts. I canít even get my hairdryer to work boondocking and it says 1200 watts. I would love to know how to get 3000 or 4000 watts so I can make coffee and dry my hair!
In order to not have to think real hard about what you plug in it takes upgrading the inverter and, probably, the batteries and converter. Alternately youíd need to run a generator when those loads are happening. If you donít like generators then that means adding solar, 400-600 watts seems to be enough for most folks.

The gold standard for power systems is a Victron suite with their Multiplus 3000 watt inverter/charger and Lithium batteries and assorted goodies.

My power system and solar ran around $10k for parts and I did the install myself. The end result means every outlet is powered all the time and we can plug in anything you can plug in at home so long as we stay under 3000 watts while boondocking.
daleyocum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2021, 11:20 AM   #5
4 Rivet Member
 
2016 Interstate Grand Tour Ext
Brookhaven , Georgia
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 253
Blog Entries: 1
You have a robust system, but I believe the Wynns have a system that is approximately 3x the size of yours. And the sun doesn't shine when the sun doesn't shine. My solution is not to cook in an RV except for some minimal microwave usage.
__________________
Instagram @coasttocoastphotoatl
coasttocoast is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2021, 12:16 PM   #6
Rivet Master
 
gator.bigfoot's Avatar
 
2007 30' Classic
KW , Ontario
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 759
The day I need a generator to go camping is day give it up. Use your solar and the rest propane, but why on earth everyone feels the need to make a lot of noise with their generators and pollute the peace and tranquility of nature is beyond me.
gator.bigfoot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2021, 02:27 PM   #7
2 Rivet Member
 
Cedar Hill , Texas
Join Date: Sep 2018
Posts: 40
When RVing I have never cooked anything indoors. I go hardcore caveman, logs and charcoal.
fthopkins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2021, 07:21 PM   #8
2 Rivet Member
 
Portage to Caravan's Avatar
 
2014 23' FB Flying Cloud
Petrolia , Ontario
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 52
All electric?

Am I missing something here? You'll burn gas in a generator but not on a stove or oven.

I second gator.bigfoot's response. "Why on earth", indeed.

I don't have a generator (yet) because I have propane, and will have as long as I can buy it.
Portage to Caravan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2021, 07:42 PM   #9
Rivet Master
 
daleyocum's Avatar
 
2018 25' Flying Cloud
Portland , Oregon
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 985
Quote:
Originally Posted by Portage to Caravan View Post
Am I missing something here? You'll burn gas in a generator but not on a stove or oven.

I second gator.bigfoot's response. "Why on earth", indeed.

I don't have a generator (yet) because I have propane, and will have as long as I can buy it.
I personally wouldnít use a generator because we have solar/lithium. I agree that would be weird to fire up a generator just so you can cook. To answer your question of why we use induction. Induction heats faster and is more consistent. It adjusts instantly. It has fewer hot spots on pans and it doesnít inject moisture and combustion byproducts into the air. The burners are flat glass so cleanup is just a quick wipe.
daleyocum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2021, 08:07 PM   #10
Rivet Master
 
nryn's Avatar

 
2019 27' Globetrotter
Driftless Area , Wisconsin
Join Date: Aug 2018
Posts: 545
Quote:
Originally Posted by daleyocum View Post
To answer your question of why we use induction. Induction heats faster and is more consistent. It adjusts instantly. It has fewer hot spots on pans and it doesn’t inject moisture and combustion byproducts into the air. The burners are flat glass so cleanup is just a quick wipe.
Huge induction fan here. It does heat faster and more consistently, but it’s also insanely energy efficient. I think I read somewhere that gas stoves transfer only 40% of their heat energy to food. Induction burners are closer to 85 or 90%. Boiling water is crazy fast. As a choice for an electric burner, it’s always my first one. I have a portable induction burner that I bring with when we travel with the Airstream (which I use when we’re plugged in or when I need a burner outside).

Still, I’d imagine it’d run down batteries pretty damn quickly, no matter how big the bank. Not quite clear on the goal—is it to eliminate propane altogether? You mention you’re not going to electric for the fridge...
__________________
Airstream adventures and enhancements thread: Traveling with Tatay
Personal blog (photography, travel, woodworking, flyfishing, food): nryn.com
nryn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2021, 08:23 PM   #11
2 Rivet Member
 
2015 25' Flying Cloud
Schaumburg , Illinois
Join Date: Jun 2020
Posts: 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by gator.bigfoot View Post
The day I need a generator to go camping is day give it up. Use your solar and the rest propane, but why on earth everyone feels the need to make a lot of noise with their generators and pollute the peace and tranquility of nature is beyond me.
I think very much like this ... but I am living a real world situation that will change me (probably forever). I do have a generator, its at home, I had no intention of needing or using it. I am on an extended stay in southern Texas for the month, and if you see the news about this region there are all kinds of power system problems. The place I am staying has been without power going on 4 full days now. I have some solar, but it has been mostly grey skies lately, and very cold (at/below freezing last few nights). I need the heat to run, and my house batteries in this circumstance don't get me more than about 10hrs. Without solar help, I cannot reliably recharge. Most folks around me have a generator, so I can borrow, and I also started using my tow vehicle with jumper cables, but the whole experience puts new perspective into the value in bringing a generator, even if just for emergency backup. I am in that zone, and very much wish I had it with me for peace of mind. I do everything I can to avoid using them, but in the situation I am in this week, I very much wish I had mine. More solar panels would NOT help me (this week), not enough surface area on my 25'. I will also be upgrading to Lithium batteries in the near future, similar reason, more margin for situations like this.
1StreamDream is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2021, 01:30 AM   #12
Rivet Master
 
daleyocum's Avatar
 
2018 25' Flying Cloud
Portland , Oregon
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 985
Quote:
Originally Posted by nryn View Post
Huge induction fan here. It does heat faster and more consistently, but itís also insanely energy efficient. I think I read somewhere that gas stoves transfer only 40% of their heat energy to food. Induction burners are closer to 85 or 90%. Boiling water is crazy fast. As a choice for an electric burner, itís always my first one. I have a portable induction burner that I bring with when we travel with the Airstream (which I use when weíre plugged in or when I need a burner outside).

Still, Iíd imagine itíd run down batteries pretty damn quickly, no matter how big the bank. Not quite clear on the goalóis it to eliminate propane altogether? You mention youíre not going to electric for the fridge...
Our induction cooktop hasnít been a problem from a power consumption standpoint in the summer, the solar tops us up by 1pm or so. In the winter we tend to camp with hookups so itís a non issue. Those cooktops are s cheap these days, under $100. They do require the high cost of admission with Lithium and a 2000w or more inverter, though.

I think Iíd always need propane for the water heater and furnace if nothing else.
daleyocum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2021, 09:06 PM   #13
2 Rivet Member
 
2020 30' Flying Cloud
Fayetteville , Georgia
Join Date: Apr 2020
Posts: 27
I bought a portable induction cooktop to use in the camper when boondocking or just stopping somewhere for lunch. I tested it out in our kitchen - comparing the boil times of the induction burner and our 5 burner electric cooktop. No comparison. The induction burner is still in the house, plugged in right next to our electric cooktop. It will go with us camping and when we're back, it will go right back to the kitchen. Get an induction burner for the camper. It creates a lot less "2nd hand heat" than the propane burner does.
T Mac is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2021, 09:44 PM   #14
Rivet Master
 
TouringDan's Avatar
 
1966 24' Tradewind
1995 34' Excella
Lynchburg , Virginia
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 3,823
I am building a “state of the art” Airstream using our 95 34’. I am installing a 12,000 btu/hr mini split heat pump to cool and heat the Airstream. The compressor is going on the tongue where the two 30# propane tanks were. I will only have room for a 10# propane tank, so I need to lower our propane consumption. I plan to use a compressor fridge so no propane needed for the fridge. This leaves us with only needing propane for the water heater and the stove. I was not aware of the efficiency of the electric induction cooktop. This might provide another way to cut down on propane consumption. We already have a 2,000 watt inverter to provide power and have a Ninja grill, so an all electric kitchen just might be in our future.

This only leaves propane needed for the water heater. I am not sure if I will have enough solar or battery power to heat water. This is certainly a possibility though.

Dan
TouringDan is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2021, 01:26 AM   #15
Rivet Master
 
daleyocum's Avatar
 
2018 25' Flying Cloud
Portland , Oregon
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 985
Quote:
Originally Posted by TouringDan View Post
I am building a “state of the art” Airstream using our 95 34’. I am installing a 12,000 btu/hr mini split heat pump to cool and heat the Airstream. The compressor is going on the tongue where the two 30# propane tanks were. I will only have room for a 10# propane tank, so I need to lower our propane consumption. I plan to use a compressor fridge so no propane needed for the fridge. This leaves us with only needing propane for the water heater and the stove. I was not aware of the efficiency of the electric induction cooktop. This might provide another way to cut down on propane consumption. We already have a 2,000 watt inverter to provide power and have a Ninja grill, so an all electric kitchen just might be in our future.

This only leaves propane needed for the water heater. I am not sure if I will have enough solar or battery power to heat water. This is certainly a possibility though.

Dan
Depending on the amount of solar you are installing induction would be high on my list. We love ours and they are dirt cheap.

We frequently max out our 3000 watt Multiplus inverter. The rule in the trailer is you can run two things that get hot at the same time! That’s quite livable but it takes awareness. 2000 watt inverter would mean you can only have one thing that gets hot.

I wouldn’t think running the hot water heater on battery would go well. Ours CAN run on the inverter but we never do. We’d rather save battery for things that can only run on electricity.
daleyocum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-21-2021, 10:42 PM   #16
Rivet Master
 
TouringDan's Avatar
 
1966 24' Tradewind
1995 34' Excella
Lynchburg , Virginia
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 3,823
Quote:
Originally Posted by daleyocum View Post
Depending on the amount of solar you are installing induction would be high on my list. We love ours and they are dirt cheap.

We frequently max out our 3000 watt Multiplus inverter. The rule in the trailer is you can run two things that get hot at the same time! Thatís quite livable but it takes awareness. 2000 watt inverter would mean you can only have one thing that gets hot.

I wouldnít think running the hot water heater on battery would go well. Ours CAN run on the inverter but we never do. Weíd rather save battery for things that can only run on electricity.


I am committed to only having a 2,000 watt inverter to operate everything in our Airstream. This is because I donít want the additional cost and complexity of the 3,000 watt Multiplus inverter and also to minimize the amount of electrical energy I am using. My plan is to never plug into shore power, to only rely on solar power, 5-100 Ah lithium batteries and the 1,000 watt inverter generator in my TV. I will have lots of solar- up to 1,600 watts on the Airstream, 400 watts on the TV bed cap and 400 watts of portable solar if needed.

I realize by having only a 2,000 watt inverter I will need to selectively operate appliances, but this is my plan.

If I can operate the water heater on electricity and have an induction cook top I could have an Airstream that would be 100% electric and operate completely off the grid. I believe this is worth pursuing.

I did some calculations and it looks like it will take about 1,000 watt hours of electrical energy to heat up 6 gallons of water from 50 to 120F. This is about 75% of the electrical energy stored in one 100 Ah battery. So heating water sounds like it is possible.

All that being said, I have nothing against propane as I will still carry my 5 gallon propane tank to operate my gas grill.

Dan
TouringDan is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2021, 01:44 AM   #17
Rivet Master
 
daleyocum's Avatar
 
2018 25' Flying Cloud
Portland , Oregon
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 985
I guess it will depend on where you camp. If it gets cold and you are away from hookups youíll need a propane furnace. Heating the trailer, which needs 1,200 watts, isnít something that can realistically be done off of batteries for very long and would max out your inverter.
daleyocum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2021, 12:30 PM   #18
Rivet Master
 
TouringDan's Avatar
 
1966 24' Tradewind
1995 34' Excella
Lynchburg , Virginia
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 3,823
All electric kitchen...has anyone done it?

It will definitely depend on how cold it is where we are camping. Now the minisplit is very efficient and, unlike regular heat pumps, operates down to -13F. It wonít max out the inverter as the input power is only 1,120 watts. The heat output is about 3,500 watts. I am thinking this will be good down to about 40F, but all this is in theory. We wonít know until we go camping.

DanClick image for larger version

Name:	IMG_0346.jpg
Views:	3
Size:	360.8 KB
ID:	389237
TouringDan is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2021, 02:46 AM   #19
Rivet Master
 
daleyocum's Avatar
 
2018 25' Flying Cloud
Portland , Oregon
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 985
I suspect your batteries will be dead by morning. Thatís going to be around 120 amp drain so roughly 1000ah.
daleyocum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-23-2021, 08:39 AM   #20
Rivet Master
 
TouringDan's Avatar
 
1966 24' Tradewind
1995 34' Excella
Lynchburg , Virginia
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 3,823
Quote:
Originally Posted by daleyocum View Post
I suspect your batteries will be dead by morning. Thatís going to be around 120 amp drain so roughly 1000ah.


I agree if the heat pump runs continuously. I am thinking that it may only run 50% of the time. If it does run continuously then I will definitely need to run the furnace. Of course I wonít remove the propane lines until I am sure that I donít need them.

I have 5 Renogy lithium batteries and have room for 8. I have read that you canít have more than 5 in parallel. I am not sure if this is correct. I will add 3 more batteries if it is acceptable.

Thanks for your comment.

Dan
TouringDan is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Has anyone done fulltime with young kids? 4 Specifically? melbel Full-Timing 15 06-15-2015 04:58 PM
Refacing of Original Cabinets-Has anyone done this? Mary Burris Cabinets, Counter Tops & Furnishings 6 05-30-2014 07:04 AM
Has anyone done window replacement/restoring on leaking windows for an Argosy? WVNC38 All Argosy Trailers 2 02-12-2013 09:31 PM
All Electric/ All Solar/ or just in the kitchen? Nick1117 Generators & Solar Power 9 11-22-2011 04:29 PM
UPHOLSTERED WALLS? has anyone done it tin can luv Interior Restoration Forum 30 02-06-2004 06:23 PM


Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Disclaimer:

This website is not affiliated with or endorsed by the Airstream, Inc. or any of its affiliates. Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:49 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.