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Old 07-15-2020, 08:22 AM   #1
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Park City , Utah
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Recommendations for essential tools

I am about to pick up a 2018 23' FC 22FB.

I've searched the forum, and I also have The (Nearly) Complete Guide to Airstream Maintenance by Rich Luhr. I've assembled the following list of essential tools. Please let me know if you think anything is missing! Note that I am only going for the essentials here; if my AS needs significant repair or maintenance, I'll likely have that done professionally.

- 1/2" drive wrench (breaker bar) with socket set (for loosening lug nuts)
- 1/2" torque wrench (for torquing nuts to proper spec)
- a high visibility road shirt/vest and flares (for roadside repairs)
- tire pressure gauge
- leveling blocks and chocks (for uneven campgrounds, and for changing tires)
- RYOBI 18v cordless drill with 3/4" adapter for stabilizer jacks
- RYOBI 18-Volt ONE+ Hybrid Transfer Pump (for transferring water from 30 gallon storage bladder to fresh tank; we'll be boondocking a lot)
- A 40-piece set of screwdriver bits for the RYOBI drill
- 2 pairs of vice grips (different sizes)
- 3 pairs of channel locks (different sizes)
- a 6" crescent wrench
- hitch ball lube/grease
- silicone spray or BoeShield T9 (for lubricating hinges, latches, locks)

Thanks!
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Old 07-15-2020, 08:30 AM   #2
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Lots of threads/posts on this:

https://www.google.com/search?q=tool...=airforums.com

. . . including some fairly recent ones at the top of those search results.

A few folks have posted PDF lists somewhere in one those threads IMO.

Good luck.

FYI/FWIW
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Old 07-15-2020, 06:59 PM   #3
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OTRA is right, there is a ton of advice on the topic out there already.

Among other things that I’m sure are listed in the various other threads in OTRA’s link I’d add a Viair RV air compressor to your list. It’s been so convenient to have it for both my TV and my trailer.
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Old 07-15-2020, 07:22 PM   #4
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Air pump to pump up low pressure tires, I just got the viar 300p rvs.

https://www.rvupgradestore.com/Viair...it-p/30034.htm


Best deal I found on the web
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Old 07-15-2020, 07:38 PM   #5
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Here are things we use every trip or almost every trip
Viair 88p air compressor
whatever the socket size needed to take the plug out of the water heater (is it 15/16?)
bubble level
on leveling blocks, recommend the anderson levelers for side to side
one of those foam kneeling pads to get underneath and reach the low point drains or fresh water tank drain.

Good to have along
Gorilla glue or wood glue
toothpicks
These are for when an interior screw falls out. Fill the void with the glue and toothpicks and trip, now you can re-screw. Screws work loose all the time from road vibration.

WD 40-good to remove road tar! Works on those labels inside also.

Zip ties, duct tape, and a flashlight.
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Old 07-16-2020, 04:50 AM   #6
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You forgot the most Important...🤔
Duct Tape if it's broken.
WD40 if it's stuck or dirty.
A hammer if it don't fit.
And zip-ties if it keeps getting lost.

Serious side...
MarineTex for the above mentioned tooth pic repair, plus many other uses.
3M Extreme Sealing Tape, for leaks and emergency fell apart repairs. 🤓

Bob
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Old 07-16-2020, 04:53 AM   #7
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A set of allen wrenches, metric and US.

Spare fuses.
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Old 07-16-2020, 06:22 AM   #8
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Park City , Utah
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Thanks, everyone. I got the ViAir compressor and a few of the other things you mentioned that weren't on my original list. I'll start there and see how it goes!
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Old 07-16-2020, 06:48 AM   #9
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18 volt drill should be a hammer/impact drill, plus drill bit index.

Pop rivet gun with 1/8" and 3/16" aluminum rivets, some Olympic rivets in 1/8" and 3/16".

Volt meter and 12v test light

A sense of humor and patience

Steve
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Old 07-16-2020, 10:39 AM   #10
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Good start — hard part is keeping the tool pile small!

Toward that end, you may want to reconsider the RYOBI 18v cordless drill with 3/4" adapter for stabilizer jacks.

That may not be “essential” gear.

I’ve not found it a burden spinning down the stabilizers with the old-fashion crank.

Ryobi makes a small, drill-sized air compressor that will run off your 18-volt Ryobi battery packs. That’s what I use.
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Old 07-17-2020, 06:14 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WhereStream View Post
Good start — hard part is keeping the tool pile small!

Toward that end, you may want to reconsider the RYOBI 18v cordless drill with 3/4" adapter for stabilizer jacks.

That may not be “essential” gear.

I’ve not found it a burden spinning down the stabilizers with the old-fashion crank.

Ryobi makes a small, drill-sized air compressor that will run off your 18-volt Ryobi battery packs. That’s what I use.
Thanks! When I searched for Ryobi air compressor, I found this. Looks to be a similar size to the ViAir that I bought. Were you thinking of a different model that is smaller, or that this just might be better since it's compatible with the Ryobi system?
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Old 07-17-2020, 07:24 AM   #12
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The Viair units usually run off your own 12-volt batteries -- either tow vehicle or trailer. Is this your setup?

The Ryobi tools require their own proprietary batteries. Two different systems, in terms of electrical power IMO.

We have a Viair 450 with optional RV pressure regulator etc. -- a great tool -- as it can also be used to winterize your trailer on the road if necessitated by weather etc..

In terms of battery operated tools, we went for the Milwaukee M12 system. They also make an 18-volt line. FYI a good general thread for this:

https://www.airforums.com/forums/f44...ls-170188.html

Happy trails,
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Old 07-17-2020, 07:26 AM   #13
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OK...another tool list. I can't resist posting this....again

Tools explained.

DRILL PRESS: A tall upright machine useful for suddenly snatching flat metal bar stock out of your hands so that it smacks you in the chest and flings your beer across the room, denting the freshly-painted project which you had carefully set in the corner where nothing could get to it.

WIRE WHEEL: Cleans paint off bolts and then throws them somewhere under the workbench with the speed of light . Also removes fingerprints and hard-earned calluses from fingers in about the time it takes you to say, 'Oh sh--!'

SKIL SAW: A portable cutting tool used to make studs too short.

PLIERS: Used to round off bolt heads. Sometimes used in the creation of blood-blisters.

BELT SANDER: An electric sanding tool commonly used to convert minor touch-up jobs into major refinishing jobs.

HACKSAW: One of a family of cutting tools built on the Ouija board principle... It transforms human energy into a crooked, unpredictable motion, and the more you attempt to influence its course, the more dismal your future becomes.

VISE-GRIPS: Generally used after pliers to completely round off bolt heads. If nothing else is available, they can also be used to transfer intense welding heat to the palm of your hand.

OXYACETYLENE TORCH: Used almost entirely for lighting various flammable objects in your shop on fire. Also handy for igniting the grease inside the wheel hub out of which you want to remove a bearing race.

TABLE SAW: A large stationary power tool commonly used to launch wood projectiles for testing wall integrity.

HYDRAULIC FLOOR JACK: Used for lowering an automobile to the ground after you have installed your new brake shoes , trapping the jack handle firmly under the bumper.

BAND SAW: A large stationary power saw primarily used by most shops to cut good aluminum sheet into smaller pieces that more easily fit into the trash can after you cut on the inside of the line instead of the outside edge.

TWO-TON ENGINE HOIST: A tool for testing the maximum tensile strength of everything you forgot to disconnect.

PHILLIPS SCREWDRIVER: Normally used to stab the vacuum seals under lids or for opening old-style paper-and-tin oil cans and splashing oil on your shirt; but can also be used, as the name implies, to strip out Phillips screw heads.

STRAIGHT SCREWDRIVER: A tool for opening paint cans.. Sometimes used to convert common slotted screws into non-removable screws and butchering your palms.

PRY BAR: A tool used to crumple the metal surrounding that clip or bracket you needed to remove in order to replace a 50 cent part.

HOSE CUTTER: A tool used to make hoses too short.

HAMMER: Originally employed as a weapon of war, the hammer nowadays is used as a kind of divining rod to locate the most expensive parts adjacent the object we are trying to hit.

UTILITY KNIFE: Used to open and slice through the contents of cardboard cartons delivered to your front door; works particularly well on contents such as seats, vinyl records, liquids in plastic bottles, collector magazines, refund checks, and rubber or plastic parts. Especially useful for slicing work clothes, but only while in use.

SON-OF-A-BITCH TOOL: (A personal favorite!) Any handy tool that you grab and throw across the garage while yelling 'Son of a BITCH!' at the top of your lungs. It is also, most often, the next tool that you will need.

Bob
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"Any nation that can survive what we have lately in the way of government, is on the high road to permanent glory."
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"Worry...a brain exercise done when it really wants to sleep"
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Old 07-17-2020, 07:42 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OTRA15 View Post
The Viair units usually run off your own 12-volt batteries -- either tow vehicle or trailer. Is this your setup?

The Ryobi tools require their own proprietary batteries. Two different systems, in terms of electrical power IMO.

We have a Viair 450 with optional RV pressure regulator etc. -- a great tool -- as it can also be used to winterize your trailer on the road if necessitated by weather etc..

In terms of battery operated tools, we went for the Milwaukee M12 system. They also make an 18-volt line. FYI a good general thread for this:

https://www.airforums.com/forums/f44...ls-170188.html

Happy trails,
I ordered the Viair 400P-RV Automatic Portable Compressor Kit with the idea that I could run it off of the AS or TV battery, yes.

I have the Ryobi 18v drill as well as a Ryobi transfer pump that uses the same battery so we can transfer fresh water from a 30 g bladder to the AS while boondocking.
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Old 07-17-2020, 04:52 PM   #15
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Lawrence , Kansas
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Water pressure regulator

Can anyone tell me IF this is the water pressure regulator (Renator M11-0660R Water Pressure Regulator Valve. Brass Lead-Free Adjustable Water Pressure Reducer with Gauge for RV Camper, and Inlet Screened Filter) I need to have in my "arsenal" of tools for our new Bambi that we've ordered???? I've tried numerous times to post a pic., but I can't for some reason! Thanks in advance!! Since I'm asking questions, I also read I need a "swiss army" hammer, but don't know exactly what it is to have on it; does anyone have any suggestions?? Thank you once again!!
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Old 07-17-2020, 07:08 PM   #16
CLOUDSPLITTER "Tahawus"
 
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I MacGyver'd one...I used it once at home to make sure the pressure was good. Haven't used it since.

Disclaimer...We haven't been hooked to city water either.
It would have been used a lot had we been.

All depends on how you 'camp'

Bob
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"Any nation that can survive what we have lately in the way of government, is on the high road to permanent glory."
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Old 07-18-2020, 04:08 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by switters View Post
Thanks! When I searched for Ryobi air compressor, I found this. Looks to be a similar size to the ViAir that I bought. Were you thinking of a different model that is smaller, or that this just might be better since it's compatible with the Ryobi system?
This is the Ryobi I was referencing. Smaller than the little air compressor.

For topping off tires, this one works fine. I wouldn’t want to have to inflate a flat with it, but you could.

18-Volt ONE+ Lithium-Ion Cordless High Pressure Inflator with Digital Gauge (Tool-Only)
https://www.homedepot.com/p/307627867
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Old 07-18-2020, 02:23 PM   #18
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If your socket set is 12 point you should have a 6 point 3/4 inch deep socket for the lug nuts. Or the Harbor Freight flip set if you want to use your wrenches on you tow vehicle.

https://www.harborfreight.com/search?q=flip%20socket
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Old 07-19-2020, 07:01 AM   #19
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Originally Posted by BillfromWI View Post
If your socket set is 12 point you should have a 6 point 3/4 inch deep socket for the lug nuts. Or the Harbor Freight flip set if you want to use your wrenches on you tow vehicle.

https://www.harborfreight.com/search?q=flip%20socket
Great. I had ordered one just like that (different brand, but exact same set).
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Old 07-19-2020, 07:02 AM   #20
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Originally Posted by WhereStream View Post
This is the Ryobi I was referencing. Smaller than the little air compressor.

For topping off tires, this one works fine. I wouldn’t want to have to inflate a flat with it, but you could.

18-Volt ONE+ Lithium-Ion Cordless High Pressure Inflator with Digital Gauge (Tool-Only)
https://www.homedepot.com/p/307627867
Ah, that is much smaller. Seems like that might be a better option for the typical use case (i.e. topping off tires) while preserving space/weight. Thanks!
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