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Old 08-11-2018, 10:20 AM   #1
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Tire pressure for 19 ft Flying Cloud

Hi, just wondering what the proper air pressure for a 19 flying cloud would be.?They are Goodyear st225/75r15 marothons. Max pressure is 65 lbs ,Weight of trailer is about 5500 lbs with water and supplies. Thanks
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Old 08-11-2018, 10:50 AM   #2
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GIYF. Search for a load-inflation table.
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Old 08-11-2018, 11:15 AM   #3
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Only a lot of assumptions with out more data. (And I am not looking up the data) Unknown year of tire, unknown max load of tire, unknown individual tire loading


Assuming single axle and both tires are loaded equally. (Bad assumption BTW as trailers have a bad habit of being loaded unequally from side to side)

5500 divided by 2 = 2750 pounds
2750 x 115% (margin) = 3162 pounds
From the above you could subtract weight transferred to tow vehicle. However it is unknown what the 5500 poun d represents. Hitched or unhitched weight.

Each tire needs to be inflated to a pressure that will handle a load of 3162 pound or more.


BTW a Marathon tire is a pretty cheap tire that is not known for heavy loads and long life. Another unknown is the age of the tire.

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Old 08-11-2018, 12:48 PM   #4
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Tire pressure for 19 ft Flying Cloud

We have almost the same trailers, ours is a 2015. I ran the GYM at 65psi cold. No issues to report. GYM are a D rated tire.

Recently upgraded to the Goodyear Endurance which is an E rated tire with 2830 load capacity per tire @ 80 psi. Run these at 76 cold. TPMS reports 84-86 hot. I've added weight over the axle (batteries) so wanted an upgraded load bearing tire.
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Old 08-11-2018, 01:10 PM   #5
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If the trailer weight is 5500 pounds and the tongue weight is (?) 600
Then the tires are supporting 4900 pounds, not 5500.
Or about 2450 per tire.
Looks like 60-65 is your target range.
If your 2011 has the original Marathons, I'd be ditching them for Endurance NOW!
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Old 08-13-2018, 04:22 PM   #6
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All 2018 and newer FC19's come with the 80 PSI 10-ply Endurance tires. This, likely due to all of the reported problems of the prior Marathon tires, which should have never been used in the first place as I don't think they ever truly met the demands of a typically loaded FC19.
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Old 08-13-2018, 04:46 PM   #7
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Ditto (almost exactly) with what Snowy has and said: have 2015 19' International, had GY Marathons @ 65 (no problems but got scared reading others stories) then switched to GY Endurance last year and run them at 75psi.
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Old 08-13-2018, 04:48 PM   #8
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Snowy, we are just about "identical to you" (with a TV 2015 F-150) and now getting a TPMS, any advice or recommendations? Thanks.
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Old 08-13-2018, 11:45 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LBelle View Post
Snowy, we are just about "identical to you" (with a TV 2015 F-150) and now getting a TPMS, any advice or recommendations? Thanks.


I went with the EEZTire with external sensors.

EEZTire Tire Pressure Monitoring System - 6 Sensors (TPMS 6) incl. 3-Year Warranty (1) https://www.amazon.com/dp/B009BEGV6S..._eMLCBb71F028A

I wanted to be able to monitor both the TV and the trailer. The six sensors enable this. I also wanted per-tire pressure settings and alarm. The TV has different pressures front to rear and of course different to the trailer.

Had to be Portable as I'll use it across two TV's and two trailers. (Other trailer is a enclosed car trailer)

I had zero issues setting it up, just followed the instructions. Setup everything on the kitchen table. One note, the sensors go to sleep, I had two which identified immediately and two that I had to shake to wake. No joke. Instructions note this but I'd bet folks miss that as there are a couple of "sensors don't work reviews"

During use, when it powers on, it takes up to 10 minutes to register all tires. But once operational it rotates through the pressure and temp about every 5 seconds per tire. Sometimes it finds all sensors quicker.

I tested a slow leak by unscrewing the sensor till I could just hear a little hiss. The system quickly alerted me of a slow leak. I unscrewed a sensor completely and it alerted me of a fast flat.

During driving it also alerted me that the rear tires of the TV got above the specified overpressure mark. That's manufacturers cold psi plus 20%. The tongue weight causes that. Fine if the fresh water tank is empty, tires stay under the 20%. Full tank and in 90 degree weather they just peak at 20% over. I reduced them 2 psi and they work perfect for driving and towing conditions.

Pressure reported by the TPMS is within 0.5psi of my manual pressure gauge. One of the TV's also has in wheel sensors which I can read separately using a scan tool. They read exactly the same as the external sensors the EEZTire uses.

Used it for about 2000 miles now. Happy.

Your mileage my vary, this is just my personal experience.
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Old 08-14-2018, 01:12 PM   #10
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As a follow-on question... I noticed that a few of you with 80 PSI rated tires, top them off cold in the mid-75 PSI range. I typically just top mine off to 80 PSI as rated... am I off here? (2018 FC'19 with Endurance E rated tires). Thanks!
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Old 08-14-2018, 01:35 PM   #11
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Tire Load/Inflation Table

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mollysdad View Post
If the trailer weight is 5500 pounds and the tongue weight is (?) 600
Then the tires are supporting 4900 pounds, not 5500.
Or about 2450 per tire.
Looks like 60-65 is your target range.
If your 2011 has the original Marathons, I'd be ditching them for Endurance NOW!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jkohnle View Post
As a follow-on question... I noticed that a few of you with 80 PSI rated tires, top them off cold in the mid-75 PSI range. I typically just top mine off to 80 PSI as rated... am I off here? (2018 FC'19 with Endurance E rated tires). Thanks!
What is so hard about reading the load/inflation table provide in post #5 by Mollysdad. Why put your faith in the FUD postulated by internet 'experts' rather than the tire engineers who created the load table?

A FC 19 has a GVWR of 4,500 lbs (2,250 lbs per tire). If you look in the table for the ST225/75 R25 and read across to the first weight above 2250 (which is 2270) and then go up and rest the recommended inflation it is 55 PSI.

Inflating to the sidewall maximum of 80 PSI is not required and will make for a very hard ride for your trailer. If you read other threads with owners complaining about loose hinges, screws backing out etc. they likely had their trailer tires inflated too hard. Overinflated tires also have a smaller area of the tire on the road. This it makes it more likely that your tires could loose adhesion in an incipient sway situation. You will also read about interplay shear on some threads. This is not a large factor in single axle trailers.
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Old 08-15-2018, 07:00 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by Adventure.AS View Post
What is so hard about reading the load/inflation table provide in post #5 by Mollysdad. Why put your faith in the FUD postulated by internet 'experts' rather than the tire engineers who created the load table? ..
The tables are MINIMUMS! Not recommendations.

Further, there is side to side and front to rear weight variation in every trailer.

And lastly, there is the issue of interplay shear.

And we haven't even talked about how trailer manufacturers didn't use to do a good job of sizing tires and providing inflation specs.

So how much more inflation pressure is needed than the minimum the table indicates - assuming you actually weigh each wheel? I don't know but SUV manufacturers are using at least 15% more load carrying capacity - and using those tables, that's about 10 psi.
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Old 08-15-2018, 07:28 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by CapriRacer View Post
The tables are MINIMUMS! Not recommendations.

Further, there is side to side and front to rear weight variation in every trailer.

And lastly, there is the issue of interplay shear.

And we haven't even talked about how trailer manufacturers didn't use to do a good job of sizing tires and providing inflation specs.

So how much more inflation pressure is needed than the minimum the table indicates - assuming you actually weigh each wheel? I don't know but SUV manufacturers are using at least 15% more load carrying capacity - and using those tables, that's about 10 psi.
My understanding is that if a trailer is loaded to GVWR there should of 10% - 15% of the GVWR carried by the tongue. For a 4,500 lb loaded trailer this would be a minimum of 450 lbs off of the tires and carried by the tow ball (TV suspension.) Wouldn't that give your suggested margin on the tires?
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Old 08-15-2018, 07:49 AM   #14
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The #1 reason for tire failure is under-inflation.

An under inflated tire for the weight it is carrying is a recipe for disaster.

I'd rather be slightly over inflated than not.

I've weighed my trailer, I'm comfortable with the pressure I inflate my E rated tires to.
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Old 08-15-2018, 08:08 AM   #15
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My understanding is that if a trailer is loaded to GVWR there should of 10% - 15% of the GVWR carried by the tongue. For a 4,500 lb loaded trailer this would be a minimum of 450 lbs off of the tires and carried by the tow ball (TV suspension.) Wouldn't that give your suggested margin on the tires?
The amount of weight moved onto the TV via the tongue is likley closer to the 10% mark. Actual results may vary. However if one is cutting it that close knowing the actual weighed load on each wheel position of the trailer would be prudent. Why mess up a vacation for under inflated or over loaded tires?


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