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Old 11-09-2018, 02:25 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by Tireman9 View Post
The center wear was more likely with bias tires. Radial treads do not respond to the same level as bias to inflation.
It may not be common with radials, but I have experienced it with tires inflated to max pressure on various passenger cars and SUV’s.
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Old 11-10-2018, 08:47 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by Daquenzer View Post
The recommended tire pressure for my tires is 80psi cold. Once on the road traveling that PSI is going to go up by about 10 to 15%. I think messing around with the tire pressure based upon load is getting just a bit ridiculous and you are asking for trouble. Fill it to the recommended PSI cold and leave it. That means in cooler weather putting more air in and in the summer putting less air in.

Two different things.
Adjusting inflation when the tires have been run i.e. when tire is not "cold" is the wrong thing to do.


Trailers should use the "cold" inflation on the tire sidewall to lower Interply. You should also confirm the load is no greater than 85% of the tire capacity when the trailer is loaded to its heaviest.


Again no messing around or adjusting inflation is necessary.


Be sure you understand what tire engineers mean by "cold inflation" Read my blog or read the reference manuals from the tire companies. Even many trailerowner's manuals cover the topic correctly.
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Old 11-10-2018, 01:21 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by Tireman9 View Post
Two different things.
Adjusting inflation when the tires have been run i.e. when tire is not "cold" is the wrong thing to do.


Trailers should use the "cold" inflation on the tire sidewall to lower Interply. You should also confirm the load is no greater than 85% of the tire capacity when the trailer is loaded to its heaviest.


Again no messing around or adjusting inflation is necessary.


Be sure you understand what tire engineers mean by "cold inflation" Read my blog or read the reference manuals from the tire companies. Even many trailerowner's manuals cover the topic correctly.


I put 80psi in my tires. The point is that PSI goes up while driving. And that in cold weather the cold PSI will naturally go down. Thus you have to add air in cold weather. Same is true in hot weather. If one is going from 50 degree weather to 90 degree weather the cold tire pressure will go up. Thus one might have to let air out. But at all times I keep tires at 80psi cold. By cold I mean not having been driven.
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Old 11-16-2018, 11:51 PM   #24
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RV trailer tire forums are loaded with hypothetical and procrastination information. This is my take on how It’s supposed to happen.

Tire inflation pressures are a product of a collaboration of information between the tire manufacturer and vehicle manufacturer. The ruling body – NHTSA/FMVSS - has given the vehicle manufacturer sole responsibility for setting the vehicle’s recommended cold tire inflation pressures for the original equipment tires. In fact, in the FMVSS they have directed them to do so. Deviations may be found in the vehicle owner’s manual. Options are available from the recommended to the sidewall max.

The standards for replacement tires are derived from the OE tire parameters. In short, they must be able to provide a load capacity, via inflation, equal to or greater than what the OE tires provided.

The following quote is from the USTMA. They set our tire standards.

“Inflation pressure recommendations may also be determined based on the tire manufacturer’s specifications, which define the amount of inflation pressure necessary to carry a given load. These inflation pressures may differ from those found on the vehicle tire placard or certification label."

"However, never use inflation pressures lower than specified by the vehicle tire placard, certification label or owner’s manual. Nor should inflation pressure exceed the maximum pressure molded on the tire sidewall.”
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Old 11-17-2018, 05:11 AM   #25
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Originally Posted by BlackAces View Post
RV trailer tire forums are loaded with hypothetical and procrastination information. This is my take on how It’s supposed to happen.

Tire inflation pressures are a product of a collaboration of information between the tire manufacturer and vehicle manufacturer. The ruling body – NHTSA/FMVSS - has given the vehicle manufacturer sole responsibility for setting the vehicle’s recommended cold tire inflation pressures for the original equipment tires. In fact, in the FMVSS they have directed them to do so. Deviations may be found in the vehicle owner’s manual. Options are available from the recommended to the sidewall max.

The standards for replacement tires are derived from the OE tire parameters. In short, they must be able to provide a load capacity, via inflation, equal to or greater than what the OE tires provided.

The following quote is from the USTMA. They set our tire standards.

“Inflation pressure recommendations may also be determined based on the tire manufacturer’s specifications, which define the amount of inflation pressure necessary to carry a given load. These inflation pressures may differ from those found on the vehicle tire placard or certification label."

"However, never use inflation pressures lower than specified by the vehicle tire placard, certification label or owner’s manual. Nor should inflation pressure exceed the maximum pressure molded on the tire sidewall.”
Good summary, except for this part:


Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackAces View Post
……… The following quote is from the USTMA. They set our tire standards...……
Tire standards are set by TRA (Tire and Rim Association) for the US. There are similar organizations in other parts of the world.

USTMA (US Tire Manufacturers Association) is the policy making body for tire manufacturers. They lobby Congress and issue technical bulletins and advisories on behalf of the manufacturers - which is what you are quoting from.
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Old 11-18-2018, 02:48 AM   #26
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Originally Posted by CapriRacer View Post
Good summary, except for this part:




Tire standards are set by TRA (Tire and Rim Association) for the US. There are similar organizations in other parts of the world.

USTMA (US Tire Manufacturers Association) is the policy making body for tire manufacturers. They lobby Congress and issue technical bulletins and advisories on behalf of the manufacturers - which is what you are quoting from.
In my sort of researching the TRA are technical and the USTMA (RMA) are more involved with safety.

Anyhow, the excerpt I quoted from the USTMA came from page 44 of the following reference (chapter #4 - RVs). It's a very good reference for those that want to know.

https://www.ustires.org/sites/defaul...TruckTires.pdf
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