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Old 05-16-2024, 11:16 PM   #1
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Got some surprising tire advice

Was at a tire dealer to replace tires (with our Airstream attached). I asked for 70psi all around. When the work was done, the tech told me, "I put 70 in the trailer and 65 front/80 rear in the truck". After asking why, his explanation included the added tongue weight. I countered with a description and function of our equalizing bars. He maintained his belief that hooked up, front and rear should be different. I received good help but had to get going and left pressures as is.
But, now I wonder: Have I missed something in 40yrs of towing? What do the rest of you do?
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Old 05-16-2024, 11:36 PM   #2
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I run the factory recommended pressure off of the yellow door jamb sticker which for my 2024 GMC 2500 is 60 PSI front and 70 PSI rear (the recommended pressures for my previous 2017 F250 were similar). It's fairly typical for front and rear tire pressures to be different.

Since the factory settings are already what is specified for maximum payload, I personally don't see a reason to go higher to accommodate tongue weight. You don't provide details about the make and model of your truck but, FWIW, 80PSI for the rear seems high and may contribute to a rougher than necessary ride for you and your trailer if it's higher than what is shown on the sticker.
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Old 05-17-2024, 05:37 AM   #3
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I set my TV (Ram 2500 diesel) to the recommendation on the door jamb, which is 65 psi, front and rear. It works well for me.
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Old 05-17-2024, 06:05 AM   #4
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Door jamb when towing, 5-7 pounds lighter than that when unladen.
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Old 05-17-2024, 06:28 AM   #5
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My 2018 GMC Sierra diesel 3/4 ton door jamb says 60 front / 75 rear. My understanding is that air supports the heaviest weight the truck can carry. The diesel engine is heavy. IMO air 60 psi can support that engine then 60 can support the empty truck bed when not towing. A much smoother ride when not towing.

When towing, I keep 60 in the front and use my CAT scale weights and tire charts for my tires to inflate the rear to 65 psi to give me 10% margin for the weight Iím carrying.

65 psi in my endurance tires gives me about the same margin for my RV. SFSG after around 40k in towing miles and 68k total miles on my truck over 6 years. Both RV and truck tires replaced once. RV replaced after 4 years due to age. TV tires replaced for smoother rubber (Michelin defenders replaced OEM Goodyear wrangler)
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Old 05-17-2024, 09:10 AM   #6
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I am towing with max 80psi in the rear and factory recommendation 65psi in the front of my RAM 2500 diesel because my last set of rear tires showed the wear signs of under inflation. When I tow, I am at my maximum payload for the truck. The sticker on the door does not indicate the tire pressure for all situations. Many people rarely load their truck to the max. 80% of my 85,000 in the last 3 years is fully loaded, while towing.
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Old 05-17-2024, 09:12 AM   #7
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TV Air Pressure

I also use factory pressure recommendation on the door: 60/65 front/rear with an F250 TV.
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Old 05-17-2024, 12:31 PM   #8
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I run at 70 psig all the way around. Just finished a 5 month trip and the tire pressures tracked within 1 psig of each other during all variations of weather conditions.
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Old 05-17-2024, 12:57 PM   #9
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I do the same

Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeinca View Post
I run the factory recommended pressure off of the yellow door jamb sticker which for my 2024 GMC 2500 is 60 PSI front and 70 PSI rear (the recommended pressures for my previous 2017 F250 were similar). It's fairly typical for front and rear tire pressures to be different.

Since the factory settings are already what is specified for maximum payload, I personally don't see a reason to go higher to accommodate tongue weight. You don't provide details about the make and model of your truck but, FWIW, 80PSI for the rear seems high and may contribute to a rougher than necessary ride for you and your trailer if it's higher than what is shown on the sticker.
I have a 2024 Chevy 2500 and my door sticker says 60 front and 70 rear. 65 psi on the AS.
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Old 05-17-2024, 03:35 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nwclassic View Post
Was at a tire dealer to replace tires (with our Airstream attached). I asked for 70psi all around. When the work was done, the tech told me, "I put 70 in the trailer and 65 front/80 rear in the truck". After asking why, his explanation included the added tongue weight. I countered with a description and function of our equalizing bars. He maintained his belief that hooked up, front and rear should be different. I received good help but had to get going and left pressures as is.
But, now I wonder: Have I missed something in 40yrs of towing? What do the rest of you do?
My 2003 3/4 ton GMC Savana passenger van has recommendations for 65 front and 80 rear when loading the van to maximum capacity. I do soften the tires to 55 front and 65 rear when I not towing or hauling a heavy load.

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Old 05-18-2024, 06:49 AM   #11
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As a tire engineer, I find it amazing how many different ways people use to figure out what pressure to run in their tires.
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Old 05-18-2024, 07:58 AM   #12
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My 3/4-ton Suburban also calls for 80psi in the rear and 60psi in the front when towing. Much less in the rear when not towing.

I'd follow the manual for the tow vehicle unless there was some compelling reason to do otherwise. Based on actual load it might be okay to run a little less in the rear, but even with the 3/4-ton chassis we run pretty close to the limits when fully loaded for a long trip between the tongue weight and all the junk we carry in the Suburban.
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Old 05-22-2024, 09:38 AM   #13
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Sounds normal to me. I've been that way for life, but my preference is 65#.
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Old 05-22-2024, 09:53 AM   #14
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You could yust calculate needed pressure for your situation, and then see who is right.

Only acurate way is to weigh as you are driving, so with TT attached and eventual wdh working.
Then per axle weighing or even better per axle-end.

Then I can make a cold pressure /axle or axle-end capacity-list. With build in maximum reserve, at wich comfort ( for TT that rivets dont popp) and gripp is still acceptable.

Need next of tires for it, so for TV and TT different.
1. Maximum load or loadindex
2. Kind of tire to determine the referencepressure, most likey 80psi for both.
3. Speedcode and if ST

Then if you need list for axle or axle-end, or even for TT total weight on tandem weighed)
And if TV rear dualload ( because of 80 psi I suspect singleload.

Arstream can mostly do with lower pressure as exeption to the rule, because tires have mostly comfortable reserves to GAWR and GVWR.
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Old 05-22-2024, 10:19 AM   #15
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Without a trip to the scales itís all just guessing. Having said that,there is no risk running max tire psi.
There is,of course, risk in running too low psi.

FWIW: everyone should make a trip to a scale with a typical load (at least once) to have a good idea of what there axle loads are.

I air up during camping season, air down in the off season.

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Old 05-22-2024, 10:20 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hans627 View Post
I set my TV (Ram 2500 diesel) to the recommendation on the door jamb, which is 65 psi, front and rear. It works well for me.
I have a 2014 Ram 2500. I buy my tires at Discount Tire and they recommend 80psi in the back and 70psi in the front.
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Old 05-22-2024, 10:29 AM   #17
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I believe most run too much tire pressure. I was taught to watch tire wear and adjust accordingly. This requires checking tread depth across the tire. If you're lower in the middle - too much PSI. If you're low on the outside, not enough PSI. With this in mind, I run 40psi on my 1/2-ton running 35" 10-ply tires when empty. I get about 80,000 miles out of set (Nitto G2s). When towing, I add 10psi to the back (only).
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Old 05-22-2024, 12:34 PM   #18
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Barry, took a look at your blog, quite insightful. I saw that you mentioned being against external TPMS valve cap sensors, due to the centrifugal force aspect of them. Do you feel that the risk of using them outweighs the usefulness of the fairly real time data they provide on a trailer tire ?
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Old 05-22-2024, 12:43 PM   #19
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MY F350 calls for 60psi front and 80psi rear. I can guess the reason is the rear, when towing is more heavily loaded and the reduced pressure in the front helps prevent understeer?
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Old 05-22-2024, 12:57 PM   #20
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My ram 2506.7 L diesel states 75 psi front 80 psi rear. That’s what I’ve always used.
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