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Old 01-10-2020, 11:48 AM   #1
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Goodyear Endurance

What tire pressure does one use with Goodyear Endurance tires. We are having them put on today. thanks
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Old 01-10-2020, 11:51 AM   #2
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Are the replacements the same designated size as the original equipment tires?
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Old 01-10-2020, 11:57 AM   #3
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Airstream recommends 80 PSI. That's the pressure stamped on the tire and loading placard. It's also the max allowable pressure of the tire. Some people run lower pressures to give their trailer a softer ride but I keep mine at the max to increase trailer stability.
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Old 01-10-2020, 01:12 PM   #4
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I run mine at 35psi but then mine is a 1958 18' Traveler with Leaf Springs. You may want to run your at a lower psi as well just to help save the interior rivets
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Old 01-10-2020, 01:15 PM   #5
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I run mine at 65.
The tire does not say, "Inflate to 80 psi."
Instead, it says "FOR MAXIMUM LOAD, inflate to 80 psi."
I don't have the maximum load so I choose 65.
You will drive yourself crazy trying to get a valid answer, even Good Year's own chart disagrees.
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Old 01-10-2020, 02:49 PM   #7
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I ran mine at 72lbs on a trip from the west coast to Kentucky last fall. On the trip I popped four interior rivets. I lowered the pressure to 65lbs for the trip back, and have popped no more rivets. Not exactly scientific but good enough for me.

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Old 01-10-2020, 02:53 PM   #8
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Recommend study the threads especially posts by true tire experts. There are a couple legitimate ones on the forum.

Bottom line as I interpreted: Pressure is load dependent but you must also account for inter ply sheer. Load / pressure charts are easy to find.
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Old 01-10-2020, 05:49 PM   #9
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We are tryng 70. Been on the road 7 years full-time and no blowouts with 65. Never say never but 80 just seems too high for us.

Thanks for all the help, BadKat
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Old 01-10-2020, 06:06 PM   #10
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When in doubt, start at the source

Here's a link to Goodyear's load/pressure table:
https://www.goodyearrvtires.com/pdfs/rv_inflation.pdf
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Old 01-10-2020, 09:38 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by badkat View Post
We are tryng 70. Been on the road 7 years full-time and no blowouts with 65. Never say never but 80 just seems too high for us.

Thanks for all the help, BadKat
Your trailer's gross vehicle weight at 8,200 lbs would have less than 2,000 lbs of load on each tire at gross weight. (deducting tongue weight probably ~1800 lbs per tire). Though, when going over a hump or bump one tire might have additional load on it momentarily.

IMO, 2,500 lbs anticipated max load on any one tire would be appropriate. A ST225/75R15 Endurance ST at 65 PSI will carry 2,540 lbs according the Goodyear's load chart. 65 PSI is what I would use, even though your Airstream Owner's Manual says to inflate to 50 psi, on page I-1. (that tire at the specified 50 psi will carry 2,150 lbs)
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Old 01-11-2020, 05:21 AM   #12
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Tire inflation for airstream trailers is quite straight forward.

The correct cold inflation pressure for your Original Equipment tires is found on the vehicle certification label, tire loading placard and in the vehicle owner’s manual. There are no ifs, ands or buts. That’s the correct cold inflation pressures.

For replacement tires that do not conform to the recommended cold inflation pressures on the vehicle certification label; the correct cold inflation pressures is the amount of cold inflation pressure needed for them to provide a load capacity equal to or greater than what the OE tires provided.

All Airstreams are built in compliance with FMVSS (standards). There is no provision in those standards that supports recommend cold inflation pressures below the trailers certified GAWRs.

For those that have older trailers without any documentation about inflation pressures; the very minimum would be cold inflation pressures that provide enough load capacity to equal the load capacity of the installed axles.

There is a RVIA recommendation for all tires on your trailer to provide at least 10% load capacity reserves above certified GAWRs.

You can dispute the above information all day but it won’t change the fact that it’s all based on information found in the FMVSS standards and USTMA standards.

Inflating tires to the load carried on your trailers comes from the FMCSA regulations for commercial vehicles and they are not applicable with FMVSS (standards).
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Old 01-11-2020, 05:39 AM   #13
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FWIW

Just to clarify . . . the GYE tires are not OEM to most Airstreams, as they are a relatively new design. The OP has a 1999 AS.

FWIW
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Old 01-11-2020, 06:47 AM   #14
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This is the method we have used on many thousands of tires over the last 50 years.

Weigh your Airstream axles loaded for travel. Divide by 4 and Add 10%, then look up the pressure in this table.

https://www.goodyearrvtires.com/pdfs/rv_inflation.pdf

If your Airstream weighs 7200 on the axles. Each tire is carrying 1800 Pounds, add 10% you get 1980 Pounds. On the Chart 45 PSI is the pressure to carry. Until you can do the process 50 PSI will be plenty.

If you run 80 PSI the tires will shake the trailer very severely and have very little traction.

Airstream has to recommend 80 PSI on the sticker because unfortunately the legal department won't allow them to lower it to the correct number.

I hope this helps.

Andy
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Old 01-11-2020, 06:59 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackAces View Post
Tire inflation for airstream trailers is quite straight forward.

The correct cold inflation pressure for your Original Equipment tires is found on the vehicle certification label, tire loading placard and in the vehicle owner’s manual. There are no ifs, ands or buts. That’s the correct cold inflation pressures.

For replacement tires that do not conform to the recommended cold inflation pressures on the vehicle certification label; the correct cold inflation pressures is the amount of cold inflation pressure needed for them to provide a load capacity equal to or greater than what the OE tires provided.

All Airstreams are built in compliance with FMVSS (standards). There is no provision in those standards that supports recommend cold inflation pressures below the trailers certified GAWRs.

snip ....

You can dispute the above information all day but it won’t change the fact that it’s all based on information found in the FMVSS standards and USTMA standards.

Inflating tires to the load carried on your trailers comes from the FMCSA regulations for commercial vehicles and they are not applicable with FMVSS (standards).
Of course this is all correct for what it says, but it does not explain why Airstream chooses to interpret the standards the way they have. So...

A primary justification to use the manufactures maximum allowable cold inflation temperature on trailers with two or more axles is to better support the trailer when one of the tires fail.

A second justification is to reduce sidewall flex and thus temperature build up, especially in warm weather.

There are trade-offs though, tire pressure in excess of that required to support the actual load when internal temperatures are in the range of the actual operating conditions results in a tire geometry that is non optimal. Breaking traction and tracking stability is reduced. Tread wear is increased. The tires do navigate tight corners a bit better though.

There is one risk of inflating the tires to the maximum cold pressure and that is if you inflate them to 80psi when the tire is at say 40 degrees in the morning but then drive to a 90 degree location later in the day, the tires will be about 7 psi over inflated, roughly 1 psi for every 7 degree change in ambient conditions. Now manufactures know this and design in a margin to compensate but blow outs and tire separations most often occur in hot weather when the weak tires are over inflated for the conditions.

So what to do? Understand and consider the trade offs and come to a decision with which you are most comfortable. Me? I've done both. At 80psi the trailer does ride stiff and the stuff inside gets jostles quite a bit more. So now I use the Goodyear chart and set them at 57psi cold. I go 8 psi higher (65 psi equivalent @ 80 deg) when the weather is going to be hot and the roads are good, to reduce sidewall flex.
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Old 01-11-2020, 08:04 AM   #16
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Agree that running max pressure may not be the best. When I picked up my new 25FBT, with GYE tires the dealer stated, "80psi, thats what is required" During the first 4000 miles or so, did not like the way things got shaken and bounced in the trailer. (Cabinets opening up, stuff on the floors, and some broken containers.

In checking the tires, each one showed that the center ribs were wearing out much faster the the outer ones. Scale weight show that the axles on the trailer loaded for travel was at 5800lbs. Tire pressure was then set at 55 PSI and the shaking and bouncing was greatly reduced and the ride much smoother with no more cabinets flying open and stuff thrown around. Tires are now showing a good wear pattern and handling even seems to be better.

So just a suggestion, in addition to checking air pressures regularly, take a close look at each tire thread and see if they are happy doing there job.

Maybe some day I might even chalk test the tires but for now things look good.

Safe travels to all and all stay well.
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Old 01-11-2020, 08:09 AM   #17
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Old 01-11-2020, 09:19 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by djb75 View Post
Here's a link to Goodyear's load/pressure table:
https://www.goodyearrvtires.com/pdfs/rv_inflation.pdf
This is why I swear I'll never read tire pressure threads again.

Okay, I read the chart. Let's say your trailer weighs in at 7000#. About 1000# is on the hitch, not the tires, so now we're putting 6000# on 4 tires. or 1500# each.
So far so good?
Now to the chart.
Follow the data and it tells me that at 1500# I should run the tires at about 28 psi.
Everyone running at 28 psi please raise your hands!
I thought so.

Tomorrow someone will mention "interply sheer" and link to the chart.....which BTW is the same chart GoodYear posted for Marathons.
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Old 01-11-2020, 10:16 AM   #19
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Originally Posted by Mollysdad View Post
I run mine at 65.
The tire does not say, "Inflate to 80 psi."
Instead, it says "FOR MAXIMUM LOAD, inflate to 80 psi."
I don't have the maximum load so I choose 65.
You will drive yourself crazy trying to get a valid answer, even Good Year's own chart disagrees.
We also run at 65 and agree with Mollysdad. Our 2019 GT 27 FB is too bouncy at 80 and we had some interior rivets pop. After trying 75 then 70, 65 seems to be the sweet spot for us. Below that and the ride gets "squishy".

By the way, every time you take your trailer to a dealer or JC it will come back to you with the tires inflated to 80. Just part of their process I guess. Always check the tire pressure before you take off from service and let some air out if you decide to run at less than 80.

Inflating to a particular PSI can be a challenge to get the same all around. In the mornings it might be cold and lower the tire PSI. In the afternoon it might be hot and raise the PSI. If the sun is shining on one side of the trailer the tires on that side can be warmer and the PSI higher...

We have a TPMS so I use that to read the pressure when inflating or deflating instead of a regular pressure gauge. That way I don't have to worry about my tire pressure gauge not being calibrated to match the TPMS sensors.

Steve
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Old 01-11-2020, 10:58 AM   #20
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Steve,
At least you have ridden in your AS so you can relate to
'squishy'.

I have also...at 65psi & 80, I could not tell the difference.
No damage or popping at sidewall minus 5lb cold on the GYE's.
TETO

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