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Old 03-22-2015, 11:09 PM   #21
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How Far?

I'm an old (really old, furry boot Army) Transportation officer. In convoy planning, you made a distinction between speed and ground coverage. Speed is Miles Per Hour, the speed limit or whatever speed your vehicle was able to maintain. Ground coverage is Miles-In-The-Hour, which includes gas stops, pit stops, lunch and just goofing off. When planning a trip to someplace new, I pull up Mapquest, get directions (and adjust the route as needed to suit myself) and then look at the mileage. Divide the miles by 48 MITH - there's the days enroute. Then I look for logical RON's (overnight stays) along the route that don't require too much longer or shorter days (say, an hour more or less). I use 48 MITH because I prefer routes on Blue Highways. If the dreaded Interstate is my route (as seldom as possible), I use 55 MITH - you still have to spend some time at 0 MPH to walk the dogs and visit the Coffee Rental Return (you don't buy coffee, you just rent it for a couple of hours).

Over 20 years wandering around from Key West to Blaine, WA, Nova Scotia to San Diego, it's worked pretty well

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Old 03-23-2015, 05:36 AM   #22
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We try to keep it at right around 350 miles per day. Break camp at about 10:00 AM, stop for lunch and quick stops every 2 hours to stretch the back(s). I've done 1,100 miles from FL to PIT several times solo. Younger and drove faster - took about 18 hours with stops. I used to run pretty quick, still do without the AS following me.

Retired now, but still do about 400-500 miles through areas we have been a number of times before and then slow it down in new areas. We like to stop by 4:00, so the 400-500 days are quick ones with very quick stops. 350 seems just about right
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Old 03-23-2015, 07:18 AM   #23
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When we travel I figure the average mph is 40. Includes pit stops, fuel, mealtime etc. 8 hours on the road nets about 300 miles. Anything over is a bonus.
Figuring an hour to set up and another to break camp you have a 10 to 11 hour day. I like to get a solid 8 hours of sleep in which only leaves 5 hours in a day.


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Old 03-23-2015, 10:24 AM   #24
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I agree with the 350 mile folks. We try to break camp around 10:00 am, take about 30 minutes for lunch and a couple of short breaks. This gets us to our next stop around 5:00 pm. Our goal while traveling is (like others) is to arrive before dark.
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Old 03-23-2015, 10:24 AM   #25
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12 hours is the most I have done. It isn't ideal, but sometimes you gotta do what you gotta do. Sometimes we break a 12 hour trip into two 6 hour trips if given enough days and a nice half-way point campground.
When we retire I will not do any more 12 hour days. For now we are weekend warriors doing the best we can.
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Old 03-23-2015, 11:21 AM   #26
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Don't forget nap time

In general, we like the 2-2-2 rule referenced earlier. However, there may be times that you have a deadline and are in a hurry and have to do several hundred miles in one day. In those instances, it's great to have an AS because you can stop anywhere to take an extended nap, watch a little TV, make a fresh pot of coffee etc. By spacing out your nap times, you can cover great distances at a more relaxed pace with less fatigue risk.
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Old 03-23-2015, 11:34 AM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Freq Flyer View Post
Just a quick fact check CWF... if you rode 2000 miles in 24 hours, you would be averaging about 83mph. You must have been dog tired after that run. Were you participating in a Cannonball run?
It was "Ferrius Glutimous"/ Iron Butt.

That was everyone's properly I don't know why it posted that... Here are facts:
1500 miles in 24 consecutive hours.
2000 miles in 36 consecutive hours.

Did both.

There is a rally "IBR"... Iron Butt Rally where you must be invited to attend. Only serious riders are involved. I did not qualify.

Click here: http://ironbutt.com/about/default.cfm?CFID=11350731&CFTOKEN=84547489
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Old 03-23-2015, 12:17 PM   #28
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I think the nature of the trip might play into the distances driven as well. On a tour to circumnavigate lake Superior, for example, one might be hard pressed to put 300 miles behind in one day. Dawdling and sight seeing would be the order of the day.
A trip to Yellowstone Park, on the other hand, might be adjusted to allow maximum time at the destination by driving hard on the way out and back.
I am disappointed if I don't already have 150 miles done by 10:00. That's the time for gas, coffee and second breakfast. Days are long in the summer time. There's no sense stopping at 15:00 when the sun shines 'till 21:00 unless sight seeing is intended. On a poking around trip 250-350/day is doing all right. If you have somewhere to go and a reason to be there, 500-600 is easily done.
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Old 03-23-2015, 12:57 PM   #29
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Hooking up, traveling, I pretty much "work" 8 hour days. That is lunch, rest stops, fuel, maybe a short nap so about 6 of that is driving.
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Old 03-23-2015, 01:08 PM   #30
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Since retirement we have slowed down more to around 2 to 6 hours a day driving, which ends up being 100 to 300 miles. That also changes when we decide to stop and investigate something interesting. We do like to be camped no later than 5:00 if and earlier if it works out.

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Old 03-23-2015, 01:20 PM   #31
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200 miles when wandering, usually a max of 300 when we actually want to get somewhere. I always figure 50mph average, so 4-6 hours.

I've spent my whole life hell bent for leather when on the road. Now I *love* stopping at the slightest provocation: photo op, lunch in the trailer, roadside attractions (really like mobile BBQs and really enjoy the super cheesy tourist traps), etc.

Always tucked by dark.

Cheers,
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Old 03-23-2015, 02:12 PM   #32
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lots of reasons for stopping early.... Setup before I collapse from fatigue, "tea time" 😜, other "worthy mention" activities....
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Old 03-23-2015, 07:51 PM   #33
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We can do 500 to 600 miles fairly well - single driver. If my son and his family are joining me and my wife, we can pull off 700 mile days on the interstates. I'm a morning person and handle that time slot. My son gets extra zzz in the mornings and reads and does business items until noon. He is rested and ready to take over after lunch to finish the day. We are on the road by 6:30am and want to end by late afternoon.
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Old 03-24-2015, 07:26 AM   #34
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Driving Time

While we try and drive around 250 miles each day, it varies a lot. We have driven as far as 1200 miles in one day and as short as 50. If we are traveling between points A and B, we usually only stay overnight. If B is a "destination" we may stay a week to soak in the "culture" or, if it gets boring right away, we are off to the next place. With gas stops, rest area stops and "doggie stops", 250 is about right. But that is just a target and if a stop is a little closer or a little longer, so be it. Just remember, when you get there, you have to "setup" before you can "rest up" so you have to factor that in. "Setup" being said, if you're just there for the night, you don't have to unhook, but it is nice to have water and electricity, so it does take a moment or two.

Remember while life is the journey, you are in charge of each trip and making it as "comfortable" for you as possible is one of the "journey's" challenges. We enjoy our travels, what we can see as we travel and what we do when we get "there"!! If you're really tired at the end of the day, then you probably over did it. If you're ready to go again after set up, then you probably under did it a little - so what!! Enjoy the trip - if you're traveling in an airstream, home is where you park and enjoying the destination is what you put into it.

Meet some new people, walk the dog an extra mile while you enjoy the birds, view or weather. You're on vacation or whatever you call it (retirement) so if you don't want to "work" at it, don't. While we have a set mileage to try and travel, we also have maps, friends advice, a thought process and our eyes to help us decide if that is too much or too little. Its your time, enjoy it in the manner that makes it a "comfortable" journey. One thing to remember, you only have one trip through life, make it as nice as you can!! For us, its Airstreaming, enjoying the USA and whatever comes along that can be determined to be enjoying HAS to be included in the "TRIP"!!!!!

Ray and Sherry Hoem
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Old 03-24-2015, 08:45 AM   #35
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RE; point a to b

I hope that my reply gets to the folks that responded to my question. That being said, thank you. The consensuses appears to be what I had considered to be a comfortable experience for my wife and I. Your personal quotes at the end says it all; here's mine. IM not here for a long time; IM here for a good time. Eight weeks to retirement, can't wait.
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Old 03-24-2015, 09:50 AM   #36
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I want to put in another vote for having a copilot, not just a navigator, but someone who can take a turn at the wheel.

My husband and I trade off when we're doing a long trip. I can sleep when he's driving which does leave me rested enough for another shift.

We're not retired yet and our main summer destination is about 900 miles away. We maximize our time at our destination by doing only one night on the road, so we often do 500 mile days. They leave us tired, but we'd rather be tired at our haven than spend another day on the road.

Realistically, I'd say 6-8 hours on the road, shared between two drivers, is a comfortable pace for us. I can easily do a 4 hour shift if I get a break halfway through to stretch my legs.
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Old 03-24-2015, 12:40 PM   #37
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Something else to consider

Not only does the driver need to consider his/her tolerance for fatigue and discomfort to determine time spent on the road, but one should consider the contents of the refrigerator.

I've found that the typical propane RV refer can hold the temperature to a safe cool level for around 5 to 6 hours. While traveling, the trailer is not being heated or cooled. In the summer, the interior can approach 100 on a really hot day or 90 on most days. If you are traveling longer than 5 to 6 hours, you will need to consider stopping for an hour or two in a spot where the trailer is level or even breaking out boards to level the trailer. Then turn on the propane and let the refer run for one or two hours until the thermometer reads 25 degrees again in the refer compartment. Shut off the propane and resume the journey. Your refer will be good for another 5 or 6 hours.

If any of you are running with the propane valve open and the refer set to run on propane, you should admit the error of your ways and stop this dangerous practice. You may have gotten away with it so far, and think its OK. But it is not. The refer flame or starting spark may ignite fuel vapors in a gas station. If there is an impact on the road, the refer flame could be a source of ignition if fuel is spilled on the road.

There is no RV expert writing RV interest columns whom advise users to run with the propane valve open and the refer running on propane.

NASA adopted a "flight experience" thought process for Space Shuttle. If a flight "got away with" some anomaly, then that became the "experience base." That kind of thinking resulted in the loss of 2 Space Shuttles and two complete crews. Don't think that you can forever "get away with" running down the road with your propane tank's valve open and the refer lit so it will keep the contents cool.

If anyone wants to comment on how many times they have run with the propane on, I'm not interested in hearing about it. I can't believe that practice could be safe. I won't do it, and I advise all A/S owners to run with the propane off, which means there is only so many hours before one needs to stop and run the refer. I think that is 5 to 6 hours.

There is an option. Remove all perishable foodstuffs from the refer and only leave items like canned drinks, bottled water etc. in the refer. Then the refer can be left off for more than 6 hours or so without possibly letting food spoil.

We must consider fire safety and food safety.
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Old 03-24-2015, 12:43 PM   #38
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I might have a co-pilot, but I absolutely do not have a navigator. I'm in it alone in that department.


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Old 03-24-2015, 12:47 PM   #39
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Something else to consider

Not only does the driver need to consider his/her tolerance for fatigue and discomfort to determine time spent on the road, but one should consider the contents of the refrigerator.

I've found that the typical propane RV refer can hold the temperature to a safe cool level for around 5 to 6 hours. While traveling, the trailer is not being heated or cooled. In the summer, the interior can approach 100 on a really hot day or 90 on most days. If you are traveling longer than 5 to 6 hours, you will need to consider stopping for an hour or two in a spot where the trailer is level or even breaking out boards to level the trailer. Then turn on the propane and let the refer run for one or two hours until the thermometer reads 25 degrees again in the refer compartment. Shut off the propane and resume the journey. Your refer will be good for another 5 or 6 hours.

If any of you are running with the propane valve open and the refer set to run on propane, you should admit the error of your ways and stop this dangerous practice. You may have gotten away with it so far, and think its OK. But it is not. The refer flame or starting spark may ignite fuel vapors in a gas station. If there is an impact on the road, the refer flame could be a source of ignition if fuel is spilled on the road.

There is no RV expert writing RV interest columns whom advise users to run with the propane valve open and the refer running on propane.

NASA adopted a "flight experience" thought process for Space Shuttle. If a flight "got away with" some anomaly, then that became the "experience base." That kind of thinking resulted in the loss of 2 Space Shuttles and two complete crews. Don't think that you can forever "get away with" running down the road with your propane tank's valve open and the refer lit so it will keep the contents cool.

If anyone wants to comment on how many times they have run with the propane on, I'm not interested in hearing about it. I can't believe that practice could be safe. I won't do it, and I advise all A/S owners to run with the propane off, which means there is only so many hours before one needs to stop and run the refer. I think that is 5 to 6 hours.

There is an option. Remove all perishable foodstuffs from the refer and only leave items like canned drinks, bottled water etc. in the refer. Then the refer can be left off for more than 6 hours or so without possibly letting food spoil.

We must consider fire safety and food safety.
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Old 03-24-2015, 02:54 PM   #40
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Getting out of bed is also a risk, but we all do it.
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