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Old 06-17-2021, 09:19 AM   #1
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1964 24' Tradewind
CADOTT , WI
Join Date: Jun 2021
Posts: 12
wood veneer to interior panels

I've got a 64 tradewind 24' single axle, where the interior shell and floor are in overall pretty decent shape, the shell could use a cleaning and will probably give it a paint covering. I'm also considering a "wood" look inside and thought wood veneer may be the lightest option for me. I think a glue on/contact cement version would work better than the peel and stick type, anyone have any experience with either?

The comes a question in how to wrap around the curves in the ceiling and front, would veneer make that bend? Would it need to be cut into strips and applied then sanded? I've seen a few pictures of the wood look I'd like, just curious as to the process.
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Old 06-17-2021, 09:26 AM   #2
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1964 24' Tradewind
CADOTT , WI
Join Date: Jun 2021
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sibbs123 View Post
i've got a 64 tradewind 24' single axle, where the interior shell and floor are in overall pretty decent shape, the shell could use a cleaning and will probably give it a paint covering. I'm also considering a "wood" look inside and thought wood veneer may be the lightest option for me. I think a glue on/contact cement version would work better than the peel and stick type, anyone have any experience with either?



The comes a question in how to wrap around the curves in the ceiling and front, would veneer make that bend? Would it need to be cut into strips and applied then sanded? I've seen a few pictures of the wood look i'd like, just curious as to the process.

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Old 06-17-2021, 10:32 AM   #3
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2017 30' Classic
Carlisle , Pennsylvania
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Hi

Normally, to get vernier to do strange stuff, you steam it first. For really fancy stuff you may steam / bend part way / steam more / bend more. How much step and repeat is a bit dependent on the wood you decide to use. For really crazy shapes you cut wedges out of the vernier before the bend process.

Wood changes size with humidity. It does this more in one direction than the other. Aluminum does not change. At some point in the humidity cycle you will have gaps or it will buckle. Indeed in extreme cases it will split. August boondock trip to the Everglades back to back with a couple weeks in Death Valley .... not a good idea.

Bob
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Old 06-17-2021, 11:51 AM   #4
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2007 30' Classic
KW , Ontario
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The question is, is that real wood. If so then that is a lot of work. Not sure how they handled the curved inside corners. My father inlaw has a sewing machine for veneer. He makes all sorts of cool furniture with it. The veneer has to be glued to a stable substrate. He uses a press, but vacuum bags are popular. With an engineered substrate the wood, would be much more stable in different environments that real wood glued up. That's why they use veneer along with the fact that you couldn't afford to use real exotic species in great quantities. It would be quite an art to glue it to the aluminum panels. But looking at the pictures it appears they avoided the inside corners. So it may be possible with the simple rounded profile of the sides. Either thin plywood or maybe even the aluminum. Or they could have used flexible plywood. Created the curve and then attached the veneer after. Definitely not for the inexperienced.
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Old 06-17-2021, 01:49 PM   #5
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1964 24' Tradewind
CADOTT , WI
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small strips?

What about small thin strips of wood veneer contact cemented to the interior panel, would that work? Or how about countertop laminate instead of wood?

Has anyone tried to contact cement anything to the stock interior panels? If so, what kind of contact cement did you use?

I typically use DAP contact cement in building laminate countertops, looking for an instant bond type cement.
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Old 06-17-2021, 03:03 PM   #6
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1966 22' Safari
1955 22' Flying Cloud
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sibbs123 View Post
What about small thin strips of wood veneer contact cemented to the interior panel, would that work? Or how about countertop laminate instead of wood?

Has anyone tried to contact cement anything to the stock interior panels? If so, what kind of contact cement did you use?

I typically use DAP contact cement in building laminate countertops, looking for an instant bond type cement.
In our 55 shower we troweled FRP adhesive on the aluminum that was painted with Zolatone. We stuck Polywall to the adhesive and rolled it flat. Works well. Maybe there’s some wood looking FRP panels you could use. I’m just a bit leery about gluing panels all over the interior walls due to temperature swings on the skin. Just my thoughts. Good luck
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Old 06-17-2021, 06:43 PM   #7
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1969 18' Caravel
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This does indeed appear to be master craftsman type of workmanship. I personally would not attempt it as a DIY, however I would wager that if you overlap the thin strips like siding, That would give you a bit of wiggle room and allow for any expansion or contraction without gaps or buckles. Pray that your roof will never leak, and drill some weep holes generously so that any condensation does not collect on the backside and rot the wood from the inside out.

Bubba raises a very good point in the previous post. Judging from your join date and number of posts, I am guessing that this is your first airstream; if so, welcome to this great community and the joys especially of vintage ownership. I would encourage you before you invest a lot of money blood sweat and tears into this little gem of yours, to spend a significant amount of time camping in it to learn it’s many quirks and joys. Make sure to touch the interior walls on a hot summer day say around two or 3 PM, as well as on a cold winter morning preferably around 5 AM. This may happen quite by accident if you sleep next to a bare aluminum wall. These experiences are worth more than reading volumes of posts in this forum.

There are likely a lot of headaches, er reasons, that this type of look does not come from any OEM, including the super expensive Bowles road chief. Best of luck to you my friend.
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Old 07-21-2021, 05:38 AM   #8
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1964 24' Tradewind
CADOTT , WI
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Originally Posted by skyguyscott View Post
This does indeed appear to be master craftsman type of workmanship. I personally would not attempt it as a DIY, however I would wager that if you overlap the thin strips like siding, That would give you a bit of wiggle room and allow for any expansion or contraction without gaps or buckles. Pray that your roof will never leak, and drill some weep holes generously so that any condensation does not collect on the backside and rot the wood from the inside out.

Bubba raises a very good point in the previous post. Judging from your join date and number of posts, I am guessing that this is your first airstream; if so, welcome to this great community and the joys especially of vintage ownership. I would encourage you before you invest a lot of money blood sweat and tears into this little gem of yours, to spend a significant amount of time camping in it to learn it’s many quirks and joys. Make sure to touch the interior walls on a hot summer day say around two or 3 PM, as well as on a cold winter morning preferably around 5 AM. This may happen quite by accident if you sleep next to a bare aluminum wall. These experiences are worth more than reading volumes of posts in this forum.

There are likely a lot of headaches, er reasons, that this type of look does not come from any OEM, including the super expensive Bowles road chief. Best of luck to you my friend.


My goal was to have something ready by Rock Fest. Still work left to do but made a push and got it close. Thursday evening through Sunday I was able to get this far. Click image for larger version

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Old 07-21-2021, 01:33 PM   #9
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How did you handle the rivets? Just go over them? Looks like there may be some screws (or other fasteners?) holding the veneers in place...

Shari
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Old 07-22-2021, 05:11 AM   #10
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1964 24' Tradewind
CADOTT , WI
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How did you handle the rivets? Just go over them? Looks like there may be some screws (or other fasteners?) holding the veneers in place...

Shari


I went over the existing rivets. I used 3m 1357 contact cement and then I also riveted through the veneer. I ripped the veneer to 2’ wide sheets so it was easier to handle. Held a piece in place , traced around it, blue taped the trace line then brushed on the glue on the wall and phenolic backed veneer, then pulled the tape off and applied the veneer. Over the seams I planed down wood to about 3/16 which allowed the necessary bend. Those are riveted on as well. Milwaukee cordless riveter was well worth the investment.
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