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Old 05-28-2020, 04:16 PM   #1
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Five Passengers and an Airstream later: Too Small?

Boondocking has its challenges and limits of occupancy. What are they? Here are some of my examples:

How times have changed when... camping, roughing it or casual traveling in a vehicle or towed trailer needs to be like a Manhattan apartment.

I often had THREE teenagers traveling to western Nebraska to tent camp and fossil collect on Ranches in the Nebraska Badlands, Kansas Chalk Beds and Colorado Florissant Fossil Bed in the later 1960's. I was 15 1/2 on a Driver's Permit in my 1956 VW with an 18 year old friend and my 14 year old brother... was a fantastic learning experience of using a map and sleeping on picnic tables at rest areas! Went in 1966, 1967, 1968 and 1969 exploring during school summers and working part time at Sears in Kansas City.

I was drafted in the Fall of 1969. Camping and getting paid! If $87.50 a month was being paid... with food and a bed, sometimes, tossed in for comfort.

Ohhhh weee.

Food, passengers and equipment in a 1956 and later a 1964 VW. No complaint.

My wife's parents had a 12 foot Nomad and moved UP into a 17 foot Mallard in the late 1950's and early 1960s. Two adults and three children. The younger brother and sister slept in hammocks above the parent's bed. A canoe was mounted onto the tow vehicle's roof. Father and son went fishing in the morning while the gals put breakfast together along lakes in New York.

Nancy was oldest and slept on the couch, or something... similar in those days.

I spent many evenings in the back of a 1967 Bronco 4x4 in the Badlands of Wyoming and western Nebraska during Cold, Warm and Hot months of 1972 to 1975 on weekends and longer during University breaks. No complaint.

Well, maybe a few when the frost was thick on the inside of the windows, but melted at sunrise and a good sleeping bag did just fine.

Found fossil insects in Colorado, sharks teeth in Kansas, saber tooth cats, primitive horse, camel, deer, canines, rabbits, mice, snake, lizard... skulls, bones and teeth in the Oligocene Badlands of Nebraska ranches. Nobody in sight and like living on the Moon for a week at a time. Set up our own tents and even had a propane cook stove, watermelon and go into town for ice cream sundaes and 'Boon Burgers'- a huge hamburger in Nebraska. This is all on less than $50 each and had change left when we returned. Some Ranchers felt we needed some good Beef... and we did!

My wife and I, two Blue Heelers are now in a 27 foot Airstream. We have room for two or three more Human Beans. Company is always nice when camped in the wild country. The limitation is room in the Tow Vehicle. The trailer IS a Manhattan apartment. No complaint.

Today... an Interstate with two adults and two children is... too small. What length trailer is advised for two adults and a number of children taken on a Trailer Trip?

Our 23 foot Safari held Nancy, myself, daughter, husband and two Blue Heelers to Carlsbad Caverns and back to Castle Rock, Colorado. No complaints. The Blue Heelers were in pet porters in the back of the shell covered 5.7L Tundra.

We offered the tent with no one interested. Parked at the RV Park outside of Carlsbad for several days. Had what was left of shower and restroom facilities. They were in poor shape and this was a big surprise. No complaint.

What is your experience of Tow Vehicle and Trailer... maximum capacity?
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Old 05-29-2020, 07:40 AM   #2
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Trailers are for sleeping, eating and storage...

We enter and exit ourl past and current Airstream(s) for breakfast and afternoon dinner. A big breakfast, pack some snacks and water and we are off exploring for the day after Sunrise. Watches and clocks... are for people at home pacing around to pass time.

I found by 9AM we had better be moving as we are... Burning Sunlight.

We want to know the temperature outside and humidity. Time is the length of our shadows and if the Sun will behind some ridge, sooner to end the day for us.

We hike with the dogs. This is their adventure, as well. No leashes. Walking sticks, really heavy duty poles found near Beaver Dams and our names carved into the handle. I have a short 'whacking stick' with my name carved into it when doing flat land hiking. Just a bit shorter than a 30 inch baseball bat. My first line of defense for whatever comes out of the woods.

We may come back to sit under the awning, reevaluate if we should stay, resume our search for whatever I thought the local geology had to offer, try a different direction or pack up early and move on.

Rarely do we stay in the trailer during the daylight hours. Much like tent campers. Otherwise we could just stay home, sell the trailer and get... FAT and LAZY and OLD.

Bad weather... we seek shelter in the trailer. Lay back and wait for everything to pass. Beats sitting in the truck when tent camping waiting for weather to blow out. This is the 'rest period' that comes, or may not come. We have been on trips where we spent sunrise to sunset outside exploring, fishing, hiking or splitting shale for 500,000,000 year old trilobites.

We tail gated for years in remote places. Mostly for the geology and to find sources of agates, sapphires, quartz crystal, geodes, gold panning and other tasks that provide exercise of mind and body.

Not for our butts on a soft cushion sitting in the trailer, day dreaming.

Most, I would say the majority, do not care one bit about things WE find interesting. That makes it difficult to have company along. Zzzzz they find all of this. Fishing... a crowd. Walking to high points for the view... not as many. Panning for sapphires in Montana... crickets and water bugs, not great for fingernails and the back.

We all have different reasons for having a trailer. An Airstream is much like having a Corvette as a 4 wheel drive on a rocky road for most. The Corvette had low clearance, like an Airstream AND tires not for mountain gravel improved roads... like an Airstream. Thus the 3 inch lift. The Michelin 16 inch tires. The provisions and tools for a day, week or several weeks and being able to fix mechanical parts of the trailer, if ever needed.

Lots of roof on the trailer... add several Solar Panels and do not sweat your batteries dying in three days, thinking your $1100 Honda is really going to make a difference. It does not... I know, we had one... what a waste of money compared to Solar. Read my comments on generators somewhere on the Forum. Probably not very kind... For RV Park television and light up the trailer, temporarily. Charging the batteries... check that out and discover what we did. Not.

No one seems to be interested in these activities, as no comments. Often some Airstream owners say... we are... mostly I AM nuts to do this to an Airstream.

Wrong... you need to try to understand that a RV Park with crowds is not why we have a trailer. We have the trailer to avoid crowds. We have neighbors at home and know them. Do your thing and... leave us alone. Maybe 10% of Airstream owners do what we use our trailer. As an elaborate Tent to camp in comfort.

I lost six pounds on the last trip. Left at around 180, today 172.5 pounds. Another pound at home. Nancy is afraid I am dying a slow pound by pound... death. The Casino buffets are closed. I am even eating less at home and need to pack on some... FAT. If you weigh 220 pounds and do not know how or why... Come Talk to RAY. I can fix that if you can handle it.

Your intestines need a break also. Boondocking and exercise will turn you into a Marine Drill Sargent in two weeks. More camping time is needed for those who need some... prompting. It works.

Often. Not. This how we enjoy life at its best. It would be nice to share our adventures with a small group... but they are like us... out busy doing what THEY want to do. That works for us.

Our paths may cross, but it is temporary. Although extra company to dig that hole along the creek bed to recover a 5 carat Sapphire for each... is incentive to have company and share stories after sunset. Sometimes... GOOD company is just perfect.
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Old 05-29-2020, 08:48 AM   #3
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Party of 4 in a 17 footer

I grew up in Airstreams. We had a 24' Tradewind, then a 31' Sovereign. We slept 5-6 in the 31 footer. Early on, four were no issue; twins in the midsection and a fold out queen for mom and dad in the front. Then my little sister was born. Dad did not want to modify the mid twins (though knowing what I know now, we could have easily added a bunk without any permanent modifications), so my sister's first bed was a platform with a crib-sized mattress pad over the shower tub. Later, my brother moved up on a cheap flip-and-fold chair on the floor in front of mom and dad's bed. Sometimes we even brought friends.

When all of us kids moved on, mom and dad bought a 32' Airstream Excella with a rear bed. Finally, Dad could have his bed made 24 hours a day!

For my family, my wife and I started out (in the late '90s and early 2000s) camping in a 1962 Corvair camper van. We had all we needed with a cooler and a water jug and a Coleman stove. And we were up off the ground.

We graduated to a 13' 1961 Serro Scotty. It was perfect for two with a rear dinette that folded into a king sized bed! We used the regular camping gear to round out the "new" camping structure and traveled happily for several years, including a 16-day excursion around the perimeter of Florida in July and a great two week trip to the Adirondacks with our 4-month-old baby. (Home base is PA). It worked for 3.

We outgrew the 13 footer when our second little girl was born. We camped in the Scotty twice, and then took a short break. My wife tasked me with permission to purchase a vintage Airstream Bambi, if I could find one for $1000 or less. Challenge accepted and met within 2 weeks!!

The total rebuild began. Most important in the ten year (and counting) project was the addition of bunk beds for the girls. Each bunk is over 6' long so the girls can continue to grow into them. The girls are getting older and bigger, and 4 in a 17' 1964 Airstream can be tight, but we spend most of our time outside and exploring the local sites. As stated by others, the Airstream is our safe place for severe weather and cooking. Meals are usually eaten outside. Still, it is funny to watch people's facial expressions when 4 of us pile into and out of a tiny Bambi.

The main goals were to get a trailer big enough for our family that we could tow with the family minivan. We accomplished both.
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Old 05-29-2020, 02:38 PM   #4
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Wasn't the '64 bug a great car? Good on gas, easy to repair...
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Old 05-29-2020, 03:49 PM   #5
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VW's and older Airstreams: :)

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Wasn't the '64 bug a great car? Good on gas, easy to repair...
******
The 1956 with a 1192cc engine with a Top Speed of... 78 mph. Maybe IF new, on the Highway... used in 1966 could not pass an 18 wheeler as the wind coming around the front of the truck cab made it impossible. Never had a speeding ticket. Ten gallon tank. Use up nine gallons and you flipped a lever for the LAST gallon as I do not recall a gas gauge.

The 1964 was no different. Excellent automobiles. They were totally sealed underneath, from the front to rear, like our Airstreams. Driven floored to maintain a highway speed, or less in the 65 to 70mph range with a head wind.

On the Interstate, well I-70 was two lanes at that time. Highways 24 and 40 from Missouri to Colorado, where the highways split up got you to Pikes Peak if you did not miss the turn. Two lanes. Not long afterward the I-70 Interstate was built and finished. Only a few recall any of this.

Anyone who now owns an Airstream and owned some of the older VW Bugs... there is a lot to compare and see similarities in comfort... and reliable. No matter what those that do not own a screw driver and a socket set, say. Over and over. Airstreams are complicated VW's without an engine, kind of thing.

Airstreams are rather simple... other than the electronics. Much like a VW. Most repairs just need some mechanical experience and the... right tool at the right time.

One would dream of affording or finding a USED Karmann Ghia.... aaahhh.

Boondockers are a small group that have had many outside hobbies and hands on types. I would say the majority worked on their own vehicles before being computerized and massive anti pollution contraptions, hoses, pumps and stuff.

Does anyone, other than Brad1, know where the gas tank is located on these older VW Bugs? Had lots of fun with that when young kids pumped gas and a VW pulled up. An exotic vehicle at the time, wasn't it?
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Old 05-29-2020, 07:46 PM   #6
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Filler cap was in the front boot. Also up there was the spare tire. Attached to the tire’s valve stem was an air hose that powered the windshield wiper. Efficient, but not for long drives in the rain. When the wipers were moving slowly it was a really bad time for a flat. Take your bicycle tire pump on long trips!
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Old 05-29-2020, 08:56 PM   #7
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Actually the air from the spare powered the windshield washer. The wipers were two speed electric. The speeds were either two slow or too fast in the usual Florida rain.

They were sealed tight enough to float for short periods in about three feet of water. We parked one on a high spot across a totally flooded parking lot at school one day.

We had to tightrope walk across the telephone poles that marked off the parking lot to get to class that morning. By the end of the day the water was gone.

The school administration did not particularly appreciate the sign we planted, “Please do not walk upon the water,” in the deepest part of the flood.
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Old 05-29-2020, 10:14 PM   #8
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VW Mock nix sticks any body remember them? [Manual turn signals].
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Old 05-30-2020, 07:37 AM   #9
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Vintage Cars/Trailers and their Owners

The older VW's had the manual turn signal which flipped out... saw them in Europe as a kid in the early 1960's. French cars where the front opened up with the steering wheel was a surprise.

The vacuum wind shield wipers. I remember having a vacuum system... if you needed to clear the window faster... you let up on the gas peddle to get it moving. Some were... manually operated.

In the Netherlands my relatives in the 1970's had this small car that pulled a small trailer for four people. When camped they used a tarp to widen their usable space. They would drive to Turkey for vacation as the weather was nice and everything was cheap. The roads off the Autobahns were very narrow, so an Airstream today would take up a lot of space. The 23 footer at 7 1/2 feet would be a good choice in rural Europe.

I lived in a Cabin as a kid with five in the family. Some people think an Airstream with four is not BIG enough. Maybe they need to rent an apartment for vacation. Their concept of camping is much too... jaded with modern convenience.

I have found two 34 foot Airstreams with large family's. One with six and the other with seven members. Wonderful families. The children were disciplined and had a container for their 'toys, supplies, games'.

Too much stuff, they had to give up something. I admire these couples. One fequently posts on the Airforums, as I met this family in the Boulder City area. Kids are home schooled, smart, happy and disciplined. The other while traveling and camped. Home schooled. As were the others.

We load up our Airstream. Pick an area we like that is remote. Go. Enjoy. Get tired of the scenery or run out of things to do... move on and repeat. When the dogs stink... we find a river. When we stink... we jump in with them. Yaaaa Hooo and the rest of you can suck wind.
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Old 05-30-2020, 10:01 AM   #10
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I've Been Everywhere Man- Hank Snow

Aren't any of you SICK of WHINERS?

I am sick and tired of whiny complainers about everything.

Can't do this. Can't do that. Get out of here.. It sure has not stopped us, one bit.

...and if you have been everywhere man... you missed a few.

Find Hank Snow- I've Been Everywhere, Man song on UTube or search the five versions on Google. It will make your day... and shut up, quit whining and check off some places you have not been, for once.
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Old 05-30-2020, 11:23 AM   #11
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Things we should not have done... but DID anyways

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Aren't any of you SICK of WHINERS?

I am sick and tired of whiny complainers about everything.

Can't do this. Can't do that. Get out of here.. It sure has not stopped us, one bit.

...and if you have been everywhere man... you missed a few.

Find Hank Snow- I've Been Everywhere, Man song on UTube or search the five versions on Google. It will make your day... and shut up, quit whining and check off some places you have not been, for once.
*****
I am using up my limited amount of photographs from remote places.... but this is for those who are on top of things. No whiners or wimpy campers here.

Two photos are how Tauranga, New Zealand trailer campers enjoy the Beaches. One photo is South Pass City... with room to spare for Airstream owners. Can you tell the difference?

In Australia the vehicles towing trailers lined up on the dock to enter the ship to go camping in Tasmania. I did not take a photo for some reason... but we are really spoiled here. Ask someone from the UK, Europe or in the Pacific.

Now I will go back to humming the song... I've been everywhere man...

Nancy and I tried everything without a master or vague plan. Everything we owned was in our backpack and we never whined once. We were 'getting old' and had our Bucket List of Things We Probably Should Have NOT Done... but DID anyways... kind of stuff. On the cheap, so we could afford an Airstream and something to tow it with.

If I needed some clothing... second hand stores had nicer clothes than we carried!

My Bucket List is very long. As time goes on... I forget where we have been and that is a great advantage.
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Old 05-30-2020, 12:00 PM   #12
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Another 'War Story' of the Good Ole Days

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Wasn't the '64 bug a great car? Good on gas, easy to repair...

Yep, my son had a 'ragtop'. He was so proud of it and couldn't get over the fact that the local Thrifty Drug store carried some engine parts for it. (So proud, that he offered to pay his own gas bills.) Until some young lady t-boned him while skidding on ice through a stop sign.


Remember when the billboards had VW ads that said "Cheap new - Expensive used"? They were right on. Wherever you looked they were all the same price a year old and a hundred or so less for another year older. No haggling over the price at a dealer.


When the oil change or tune-up time came up, I would drive mine to the local VW dealer where they would drop the engine and 'hook-up' their loaner engine and get you on the road again. This usually only took them a few minutes and it just wasn't economical enough to do myself.



I remember spending over a day getting it packed up just right for an upcoming vacation at a beach, with a new baby's crib and room for her 2-yr-old sister etc., AND a 19" black & white TV - all in the back seat.



Better hold the steering wheel tight when you came out of an overpass or you might change lanes when you came out of it. A rear-view mirror was an absolute must so you could hold on tight when a passing truck's 'breeze' could blow you off-course.



I was pretty nervous about the concept of 'kicking' in the reserve gas tank while in traffic and hauling down the road, and the main tank ran out of fuel, so I opted for a '62 that had an actual gas gauge. It was only a year old and about a hundred bucks less than a new one, but it was worth it because it had that gas gauge. Often, we would load it up with all our camping gear and enjoy life. Until, I tried running it on a beach and got stuck in the sand. Not wanting to have it merge with the tide, a passerby and I lifted the rear end of the bug and got it out of the sand-trap. I traded it for a big Pontiac Bonny (you know, with the push-button radio.) But that's another story.


The vision of "Make America Great Again" has already happened, so get over it!
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Old 05-30-2020, 12:15 PM   #13
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Wow... there are normal people on the Forum. And... VW stories.

I was a Senior at Van Horn High School in 1967. A 1956 VW Bug was like owning a Tesla in 1967. My 1956 was $350 off the Dealer's lot. Fifty bucks down and paid off the rest in... twelve months.

One day after classes I went out to where I was... well WAS parked. Some geniuses picked my VW up and placed it between two trees. One in front. One in back. Broke my front bumper in the process, but that did not stop them. Needed two bolts, costing around $1, but that was a lot after one hour working at the Sears Catalog store for $1.15 an hour after classes.

NOT rubber baby buggy bumper bolts. Real bolts. German made VW's. OK?

I rounded up some suspects and removed my 1956 from the Tree Parking Spot and nobody took any credit for this prank. They no doubt were driving them cheap 1957 Chevys and Nomads and heavier vehicles.

Hot chicks did not go for a VW with the stick shift between the seats. Although their parents thought it great. Or... a Corvair for $75 if you could handle breathing the exhaust in the engine heating system. Nader fixed that POS... now they are... collectable. Imagine that.

Five passengers in a VW? Sure. Chip in for fuel, go to the Pinball Parlor for a nickel a game, take a deep breath... back into the VW and drop everyone off.
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Old 05-30-2020, 07:44 PM   #14
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7 in a 8' Pop-Up Camper in 1962

I am not a big fan of constantly reciting stories from the "good old days" because too often they weren't all that good for many people. We were lucky in my family because my parents were big believers in family vacations - affordable vacations that is. We struggled for years trying to find something that worked. In Michigan the standard summer vacation was to go to a cottage on a lake someplace for a week. Some lucky people owned cottages and were able to spend most the summers there. In our case we had to find one to rent for a week, which we did many times. A week goes by pretty quickly, and being a rental, it wasn't ours.

Much to my surprise one day in June, 1962 my dad said, "lets go look at tent campers". I had no idea what a tent camper was but I was all for it. We had tried camping several time in canvas tents my dad borrowed but this didn't work out very well, We seemed to always pick the week where it rained every day. And 7 people in a canvas tent in the rain isn't much fun. Tent campers. were a new thing at the time. There were trailers of course, but pop-up tent campers were pretty unique. They had several advantages over trailers - they were easier to tow with smaller vehicles, and they were much cheaper.

So that Saturday we took a ride to nearby camper dealer and looked at Apache Pop-up tent trailers. These were built by the Vesely Company in Lapeer, Michigan. They had several models of course, from "basic" to "fancy". The one my dad liked was near the top of the line, a "Silver Eagle". It was pretty basic, not even a refrigerator or ice box. The body was an empty box when the beds were pulled out. But I was hooked instantly. My dad was too and he bought one. I was stunned! It cost $600. We were supposed to pick it up a week later and I couldn't wait. Finally the day arrived and we went and got it - so exciting. On the way home we stopped at a Super K, Kmart. I hadn't been to one before and it was great. My parent bought out the store, or so it seemed, buying all the camping necessities we didn't have.

There are 7 in my family - five kids and two parents. The little trailer could not accommodate everyone so my dad bought an "add-a-room" for the trailer. This was a canvas tent that attached to the trailer and more than doubled the space. Unfortunately, it was on the ground so once again we had the joy of wet canvas camping. But it was fine, much better than a week once a summer in someone else's cottage.

We went all over Michigan, and much of nearby Ontario with the camper. Many weekend trips and longer multi-week ones. Michigan state park campgrounds at that time cost $0.50/night or $0.75 if you wanted electricity. My dad built boxes to hold everything. First he built a kitchen box that sat on four pipe legs and held all out kitchen stuff. Then he built a closet box - this was the width of the trailer, about 6 feet. It was about 20 inches across and 18 inches high. It had 5 compartments. Each of us got one compartment for our clothes and necessities. That was it. These boxes fit in the base of the trailer and could be moved out when we set up camp. He also built boxes for a roof top carrier - one to hold the add-a-room and the other for "stuff". We also carried a 17' Grumman canoe my sister and I bought a couple of years later. All of this was carried and towed with a 1960 Oldsmobile Super 88. A great car. I don't know what the axle ratings were, but I'm sure we were at max!

I loved that camper. We had a lot of fun and we never felt it was too small. Going camping was all that mattered.

Now I have a shiny new Airstream and going campling is still all that matters.
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Old 05-30-2020, 08:43 PM   #15
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A youth's dream come true!

BobnGayl... a powerful story for everyone to get the sense that we all are a big family with stories to tell.

Some dreams come true through hard work and determination. You did it!
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Old 06-03-2020, 10:55 AM   #16
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4 people, 2 dogs, 20 feet

We have a 20' 1980 Caravelle which has a narrow body. It is totally custom with a Full size bed, 2 bunk beds, and a table for 4. We have found that we have to limit the number of people moving around at a time. The only things we can all do comfortably at the same time inside the camper are to eat, sleep, and play cards. If the weather is nice, there are few problems, but the dogs and the humans easily get in each others' way so there is a lot of asking to move over so I can open a drawer, pull out a bin, get to the bathroom, etc. Compared to all my other camping standards, it is pure luxury and I wouldn't trade it for anything. My wife would get a bigger airstream or a motorhome in a second, but I am hoping to hold her off on that until we retire.
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Old 06-03-2020, 01:59 PM   #17
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4 people, 2 dogs. 20 feet?

Timzog... I am sorry. You have exaggerated a bit.

I calculated the FEET at 16, unless you have a cat. Then 20 feet.

When you play cards, is it Four Handed Pinochle with two players, or Eight Handed Pinochle with four?

You will cherish those days when you were One Cat short of 20. Be well.
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Old 06-03-2020, 02:22 PM   #18
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1976 Argosy 28
calgary , Alberta
Join Date: Jan 2019
Posts: 48
As a kid my folks were in the Canadian military so we moved lots not a lot of Spare cash but we made due. We went from a tent to a truck and camper so dad could pull the boat we needed while out on Vancouver Island. We moved back to Alberta from there and we got a class c '78 motor home that with limited funds was our holiday trip. We took that RV from the Mexico border to the arctic circle and lots between. My hubby and when are kids were small had a 10ft tent trailer we packed our 2 kids and the neighbours 3 plus 2 dogs in it for a weekend and had a blast. I bought our motorhome from my folks 10yrs ago when they stopped using it and my family used it hauled horses with it and it was THE hangout place for kids at the 4h rodeo affectionately know as the shag wagon. I sold it to a young couple just over a year ago and they will be making new memories in it. I am redoing a '76 Argosy and it will be my new travel partner to take the grandkids that will be showing up and the dogs. Size needs have changed over the years for sure one thing is no more ground sleeping for me
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Old 06-03-2020, 04:03 PM   #19
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1986 Argosy
Denver , Pennsylvania
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 112
I had an Argosy 33FK. It was really nice when I had to stay in it for 6 months (I was working 12 - 14 hour days, 7 days a week about 1¾ hours travel each way from home and had 6 cats in it with me). I took it camping several times. Boondocking was easy with so much space and so many windows to open. 4 adults and 3 - 50 lb dogs had no issues in it. The only thing that got interesting with it was finding spaces big enough at some of the hole in the wall campgrounds.

Fast forward a number of years later and I've found that anything over 20 feet just is wasted space. The ex and I with the 3 dogs ran 2 to 3 week trips at a time in a 21'. It was the perfect size and we could park it most anywhere.

When I camp with the horses it's all tent camping. It's hard to haul a lot of extra stuff around since I don't have an LQ trailer. But I have a tent that will partition in 3 sections and it has plenty of room. It gets a little tight with 6 adults in it, but it's doable.

I think honestly it's all what you make of it. My 1st camper was a 16' I got that when I was 17. My next one was a 9' pop-up. I worked up big then went back small.

Organization and attitude are what makes it fun. Space is both a liability and an asset.
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Old 06-03-2020, 06:59 PM   #20
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1967 17' Caravel
Pocatello , Idaho
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 846
Back to VWs for a minute: I had borrowed my father's '59 VW bug to go from home in Miami to one of Florida's pristine and empty (at the time) beaches with three teenaged friends. We were going uphill--what passes for uphill in Fla, barely perceptible upgrade--and the bug was slowing down. My sister immediately sang out "can't you-all pedal any faster?!"

Seriously for sale: 1973 VW bug convertible, lime green with black top, all original and in great shape, by original owner. Any takers?
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