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Old 06-06-2019, 09:13 PM   #1
Rivet Master
 
2005 22' International CCD
Buckhorn , Ontario
Join Date: Jan 2004
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Panel Removal - sequence

Hi...

I have tried the search and have read through too many different threads to no avail.

I am looking for any help in the sequence of panel removal in my CCD 05 22'

I want to access only the inside of the curb side curved panel and the side panel below it.

I know I need to remove the window coping and rails and trim etc, but how much do I have to remove to release the curved panel????

Any help would be so very much appreciated.
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Old 06-07-2019, 10:09 AM   #2
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1973 21' Globetrotter
Houston , Texas
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I'm a little unclear--are you working from the inside, removing the interior skins to access the back-side of the exteriar segments, or are you working from the outside?

What is the ultimate goal of this exercise (ie., accessing the interior side fo the external skin to roll dents out, or removal and replacement of the segments)?
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Old 06-07-2019, 11:59 AM   #3
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2005 22' International CCD
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My ultimate goal is to make this look not so horrible. A tree fell on my baby last spring.

It does not leak and no seals were compromised - just more of an eyesoar than anything.

In the interim of being rich - and no insurance will not cover it, quote repairs range from $4K (independent) -6K (Mothership) US to $10K plus here in Ontario at Can/Am.

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So as I am deep into working on my trailer this year, was thinking of taking care of the dent at the same time as other things like rear leak and front leak, water heater area leak, vinyl floor replacement.

I have removed everything to do the floor (save the bathroom and galley - still up in the air if I really need to remove the closet at this stage.) So I have lots of room to move around.

Regarding the dent - I am debating on two options:

1. Remove the inner panels and push the dents out or;
2. Have a go at the pointless glue pulling tools.

Either way will be time consuming and a lot of patience.

Here are two shots from the inside.

I'm thinking that with the window various trim and curtain rail removed - I can then remove that centre panel that is over top of the curved panel - release the rivets from the main centre panel and at the top of the side panel and I should be able to slip the curve panel in and out?
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Sorry this pic did not rotate left...
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So I am thinking I may have better luck as a DIY job to smooth it out from the inside rather than trying to pull it out from the outside - what do you think?
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Old 06-07-2019, 02:39 PM   #4
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1973 21' Globetrotter
Houston , Texas
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I agree, working the dents from the inside will probably give better results than trying to pull them from the outside.

I am thoroughly knowledgeable about how the 70's and some 80's trailers went together up there, but claim no knowledge for the more modern design. What I would offer, though is that typically these things go together a little bit like installing shingles, ie., when installing, you put the first piece in place, and then you overlap it a bit when installing the second piece, overlap the second piece with the third, and so on. So the key is figuring out which was the last pice to be installed (it is on "top" of everything else"), and then work your way down through the layers until the piece you need to remove is the top piece. So I think you are on the right track--usually that center piece is the last to go in.

Be very careful as you drill out the interior rivets and disassemble the interior skins. All that aluminum has a factory plasticoat on it, and if you scratch it, not only will it be noticeable, but it will immediately begin to oxidize.

You are lucky you don't have the big plastic end-caps they used inthe earlier years, because those were typically the first thing put in place, and all the aluminum overlapped them, so there was a lot of disassembly required to get the endcap out.

As far as working the dent, a few years ago, it was a common practice to fill a good sized bag with sand, and use it on the outside of the trailer as an "anvil" of sorts, and then to beat on the dent from the inside with a rubber mallet. This might be good to do the rough moving of the skin outwards. Some folks have had good success using a roller to smooth things out. Look for Aerowood's thread on dent rollers that he is making. Word of caution, I made my own dent roller, but may have used a wheel with too tight of a radius, or maybe I pushed too hard, and I ended up making a real mess of the segment I was working on. Go easy until you get the feel for the amount of pressure that is need to work a dent out. It is probably less than you think.

good luck!
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Old 06-07-2019, 03:45 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 05ModPod View Post
...

Regarding the dent - I am debating on two options:

1. Remove the inner panels and push the dents out or;
2. Have a go at the pointless glue pulling tools.

....

I would go with the 3rd option and replace the 2 panels. If you are planning to gain access to the inside, you can even use buck rivets. Anything else will look just as bad as it looks now, just a little different.

I have replaced those panels by the windows without removing the window itself. Once you gain access to the inside you will find that the window was sealed with plenty of vulkem after assembly. Not much sealant between window frame and skin at all.
After you cut the sealant and drill out all rivets, the bad panels slide out "fairly" easy. You would of course have to deal with the awning brackets, but that side is the non spring loaded side, so you can just remove the bracket and leave the awning in place.
If you are pulling out interior stuff and do flooring, it seems your are handy enough to tackle this 1 weekend job
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Old 06-08-2019, 09:59 AM   #6
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2005 22' International CCD
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PeterH-Airstreamer View Post
I would go with the 3rd option and replace the 2 panels. If you are planning to gain access to the inside, you can even use buck rivets. Anything else will look just as bad as it looks now, just a little different.

If you are pulling out interior stuff and do flooring, it seems your are handy enough to tackle this 1 weekend job
Thanks for the vote of confidence

It has more to do with money at the moment, and obtaining the tools I would need.

I was at the factory last year and asked a tech to advise on sequence. He would not divulge.

I did learn something in that I thought there was a rib under the line of rivets between the curve and window panel, where the tree branch punched almost through. There is not so that would make pushing/tapping out the dent much easier.

Think I will compromise, remove the panels from inside, and knock out dent best I can. Learn from the removal so that when I can afford the panels in a few years, I can do it myself for 1/4 of the price quoted. In the interim maybe learn some buck riveting skills.

I do see your point though it makes perfect sense with inside panels off to get the outside ones done. But the only reason for me taking the panels off is to sort the dent a bit better.

Right now my dogs teeth are a priority.
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