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Old 04-04-2019, 08:53 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by Adventure.AS View Post
If you a drawing 16 amps at 120 volts AC (1920 watts) you will be drawing 176.64 amps at 12 volt. (https://www.batterystuff.com/kb/tool...-inverter.html)

You might be able to start your air conditioner, but you couldn't run it very long.


That is exactly what I was missing... the step down from 120-12v. So with the inverter I plan to get, it can supplement the generator power with battery when needed, but I will definitely need the generator to run the a/c for anything more than a few minutes. Thanks
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Old 04-04-2019, 09:08 AM   #22
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Camping makes us happier, and when we let it, it makes us more inventive .... and possibly more aware that lots of "stuff" we spend perfectly good money on, is actually more trouble to use than the benefit it brings. I do not own a food processor. It is stupid for ONE person, but one trailer over there is a family with four teenagers. Their food processor probably saves them enough that they can afford a camper. Scalloped potatoes and cole slaw are cheap, and they need to make it in mass quanties weekly. My on the road heated sandwiches... all sort of panini types from cast iron on the stove burner. Engine cooking does work, but the diesel is a bit up there to use.

Oh and I tried to lend my hand canopener to a kid.... her look? Priceless. Love to see her try to go Amish for a week.
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Old 04-04-2019, 09:44 AM   #23
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Count me in the ďone trailer overĒ group. My wife used to love car camping. One really cold experience two years ago in Yosemite and she hadnít wanted to go again. Now itís an Airstream and make sure the heater and a/c work. Two learning curve battery issues over the last 3 months and she is questioning the trailer too. I canít say itís reasonable, just is what it is. Better to be out there camping than not making the memories now when the kids are still at home.

If it were just me, Iíd have the Basecamp and be so isolated when I camp, and beer and food would be my only concerns
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Old 04-07-2019, 10:50 AM   #24
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No it is not. The standard inverter does not power the microwave.

You have 3 options to run your microwave:

1. Plug into shore power (you already know this)

2. Run a small generator (Provide portable shore power)

3. Upgrade your batteries, inverter and perform some 120v re-wiring to safely run the microwave off the batteries

Option #1 is no cost (as you know, you can plug in while camping, etc..)
Option #2 is $750 - $2,000 depending on the generator you want to buy
Option #3 is $3,500 - $30,000 depending on how har you want to go with an off grid power system
I agree with above - it all depends on what you're willing to spend to nuke your food
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Old 04-07-2019, 11:21 AM   #25
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When I first saw the question, "Using Microwave While Traveling" I was picturing someone doing a Lucille Ball and trying to cook whie bouncing dwn the road!
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Old 04-07-2019, 11:28 AM   #26
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Shazam, judging from your three posts below, you seem to have a fundamental lack of understanding about the two electrical systems in your trailer IMO:

-- 12-volt direct current from the batteries [or converter when on shore power]
-- 120-volt alternating current [when on shore power, or from the inverter powered by batteries]

I would suggest that you read your owner's manual, and the following article:

http://www.batteriesnorthwest.com/batteryschool.cfm

Until you are clear about your two separate [but interrelated] systems, a meaningful discussion will be difficult.

Cheers,

Peter

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shazam View Post
We are unable to use our convection microwave oven in our 25 FC while traveling. Is the microwave only usable when connected to shore power? Batteries were fully charged. Even with the TV connected and running, the microwave would not turn on. Plug into shore power, it works great. Is this typical performance, and is there any way I can heat up food on the road?
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My paper work says we have a 1000W inverter. I turned on the inverter switch above the sink, but the microwave does not turn on. Is the microwave on the inverter circuit?
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Originally Posted by Shazam View Post
Thanks for the replies.

Propane was not the preferred option for heading up the sandwich.

We have upgraded AGM batteries along with solar. Looks like some rewiring is needed to get power to the microwave outlet.
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Old 04-07-2019, 11:53 AM   #27
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I think the simplest solution is to buy a 2kw generator. I have a Honda 2 kw, which runs the microwave in my FC 27 (although it revs up pretty high when doing so, indicating a substantial current draw). One of the reasons we bought a 27 is that it is (was) the only model that offered a propane powered oven and cooktop. The included microwave is smaller than the one in other models and is microwave only, not convection. It sits in a pull-out drawer as part of the pantry.

The generator is also handy for battery charging and for powering the satellite dish receiver (which does not like the stock inverter AC power).
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Old 04-07-2019, 12:16 PM   #28
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There is actually a fourth option but not that enticing. You can downsize the microwave to a 950 watt unit It just happens to be what the prior owner of my trailer installed and it works but takes practice and a bit of time/power setting recalculation to achieve the same results.
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Old 04-07-2019, 12:18 PM   #29
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So one other option:

Coleman makes a green gasoline (or propane) camp stove you set on a picnic table. Been making them since WWII. We just unload it from our storage and in 3-5 mins we have an outside range to cook over. It can heat everything we need.

We stopped carrying our generator on boondocking trips. Just too much to deal with. Our inside range is for coffee and tea. Coleman is for those skillet meals like fresh-caught fish or the big breakfast or soups. When boondocking we forget the microwave and do what we did 30 years ago - plan meals that use more traditional means of prep.

We find that camping is where we spend time outside. And the longer it takes to cook a meal, the better it tastes. Just saying what works for us.
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Old 04-08-2019, 04:37 PM   #30
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You can only use micro when plugged into shore power or using generators while boon docking. We used our microwave all the way from Utah to Alaska and back while plugged into our two Yamaha generators. No problem!
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Old 04-08-2019, 04:43 PM   #31
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Quote:
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There is actually a fourth option but not that enticing. You can downsize the microwave to a 950 watt unit It just happens to be what the prior owner of my trailer installed and it works but takes practice and a bit of time/power setting recalculation to achieve the same results.


I donít believe you will find a microwave that will operate off a 1,000 watt inverter. I tried and failed. I found a 700 watt microwave that was suppose to use 850 watts but actually required almost 1,100 watts. A typical 1,000 watt microwave will require 1,500 watts to operate.

My solution was to buy a rice cooker. It requires only 400 watts. I havenít cooked rice yet but it works great for heating stuff up. I ordered it from Amazon for $20.

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Old 04-08-2019, 04:55 PM   #32
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Originally Posted by Shazam View Post
Thanks for the replies.



Propane was not the preferred option for heading up the sandwich.



We have upgraded AGM batteries along with solar. Looks like some rewiring is needed to get power to the microwave outlet.


Shazam

You should be fine. When we had golf cart batteries and a 1,000 watt inverter we could operate all 120 volt appliances except the microwave- tv, rice cooker, hair dryer on low, toaster, etc.

If you want to operate your microwave, I recommend installing a 2,000 watt inverter.

Dan
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Old 04-09-2019, 12:45 PM   #33
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Shazam

You should be fine. When we had golf cart batteries and a 1,000 watt inverter we could operate all 120 volt appliances except the microwave- tv, rice cooker, hair dryer on low, toaster, etc.

If you want to operate your microwave, I recommend installing a 2,000 watt inverter.

Dan


And more battery capacity....and a way to charge that extra capacity.

Also, inverters arenít 100% efficient (agree with 2000)
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Old 04-09-2019, 01:02 PM   #34
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If you want to operate your microwave, I recommend installing a 2,000 watt inverter.

Dan



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And more battery capacity....and a way to charge that extra capacity.
And thick battery cables and large fuses/breakers.

Running a microwave is not an inexpensive proposition as all the DC components need to be "beefier" than stock.
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Old 04-09-2019, 05:15 PM   #35
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Hi again,

I am NOT an electrician and there have been many intelligent replies on this thread already, so what can I add? Why can some stuff run when we aren't plugged in and some can?

It is actually kinda simple. An inverter changes DC into AC so any AC appliance with a low enough draw can work. "Draw" or "resistance" is highest in any electrical appliance that produces a lot of heat. Electric stoves, burners, microwaves, irons, hairdryers need more power than lights, clocks, shavers, tv etc. The stock inverter lets you run the low resistance stuff.

Incidentally when tv and computer monitors used to be CRTs they were high resistance. The first LCD screen we bought used 1/10 the enwrgy of its predecessor.

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Old 04-09-2019, 05:57 PM   #36
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I found a perfect graphic example of why you want Lithium batteries to run a microwave, directly from Battleborn:
https://battlebornbatteries.com/comp...teries-series/

"What is clear from the curves in Figure 2 is that the relative performance is highly sensitive to the discharge rate of the batteries. At a 50A discharge rate, the BB10012 can sustain above the 11.8V cutoff for almost 2 hours, whereas the GC2 batteries cutout in less than an hour. At the lowest discharge rate, the BB10012 can deliver 10A for around 9.5 hours, whereas the GC2 batteries last for over almost 12 hours."

My 6V golf cart batteries perform perfectly at the up to 10A discharge rate I typically draw in my Airstream. But the 170A draw of a microwave would discharge the golf cart batteries almost immediately. Even my wife's 700W hairdryer pulls the batteries down very quickly as evidenced in the 50A discharge rate graph. I think TouringDan's pair of Battleborn batteries with the 2000W inverter is a great setup for running the microwave for a short period of time.

Here is a graph for an AGM battery: https://www.alibaba.com/product-deta...551575906.html Very similar to a Wet Cell Golf Cart Battery at 1 hour for a 200AH battery. This chart shows a 200A draw at only 12 minutes! Sure looks like Lithium is the way to go for microwave use. I found a chart for a Concord AGM Battery on page 12 of this PDF and it looked very similar at less than 30 minutes at a 1C discharge rate: https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&sour...54938028948044
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Old 04-09-2019, 06:20 PM   #37
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After reading all this I do not feel bad about stopping to buy lunch and hot coffee. I seem to be saving a bunch of money by doing that.
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Old 04-09-2019, 07:56 PM   #38
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Iím considering removing a wardrobe and custom installing / upgrading to a radarange.

I think a 7,000 watt genset to support 50 amp service on my L1 leg should suffice for power needs while boondocking.
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Old 04-09-2019, 09:17 PM   #39
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If you want to operate your microwave, I recommend installing a 2,000 watt inverter.



Dan




And thick battery cables and large fuses/breakers.



Running a microwave is not an inexpensive proposition as all the DC components need to be "beefier" than stock.


When I installed my 1,000 watt inverter the battery cables were #4 and there was a 150 amp fuse required. Going to a 2,000 watt inverter required going to 1/0 cable and a 300 amp fuse. Care is also required in the build quality of the cables and lugs and torquing the connections to the batteries. Total material cost was about $500 for the Samlex inverter, the cables and the fuse. In addition to being able to operate the microwave, it will probably operate other kitchen appliances (that we donít even have) and our small 5,000 btu/hr AC.
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