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Old 12-19-2019, 02:05 PM   #1
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conduit

Greetings streamers, on this 3 degree day in western NY. I respectfully put the following to you for your esteemed wisdom and knowledge!!!


I have scoured the electrical portion of the forum and cannot find anything about pulling new wiring through conduit (or pex) and attaching that to the interior of the exterior wall. Any issues in doing this beyond the esthetic and value? Seems safer as the abrading of the wire insulation would be removed, and lot easier for this old bird.

Been changing the floorpan in my ’64 globetrotter. Removing the inner panels to get to the existing wiring is not feasible. I anticipate I will be changing the location of lights, etc., and will be doing all the work myself.

I’ve removed the front gaucho for my deliciously comfortable recliner and for my dogs. The toilet, sink and tub also removed. Grey water tank replaced black water, and I will add a nature’s head composter.

I will be moving the sink and stove top to the driver’s side over the battery compartment and fresh water tank. New frig remains in place on passenger side, and will be putting a bed on that side with storage underneath in the back quarter.

Been tooling around in this wonderful capsule for 3 years, and finally have arrived at retirement (time but not much $) and ready to light this candle.

I sincerely thank you all in advance for your concerns and knowledge.
di
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Old 12-19-2019, 02:33 PM   #2
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I’m confused as to the location that you’re wanting to run the wire?? Sorry
But don’t use pex! You can use electrical pvc, non-metallic liquid tight flex, metallic liquid tight flex or metallic flex conduit.
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Old 12-19-2019, 02:53 PM   #3
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in our 22fb, a ran 2" flexible conduit between the area under the fridge to under the bed
i ran a fiberglass pull string trough it

i use it for both power and data/signal. it has both 10 ga and cat 6 cables in
no messy cable and only a single conduit visible between the sink and bed

the pull string allows me to add more cable, but only cat 6 as there is no more room for power cables.

IMHO, pull as big a conduit as you can. you WILL fill it
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Old 12-19-2019, 03:33 PM   #4
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I used blue plastic conduit for the 12V stuff and AC armored for the 120v stuff. I've been very happy with the results.
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Old 12-19-2019, 08:24 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markdoane View Post
I used blue plastic conduit for the 12V stuff and AC armored for the 120v stuff. I've been very happy with the results.
You did a really good job!!! Looks great


To the OP
The different voltages, low voltage and data are not to be ran in the same conduit. Especially data
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Old 12-19-2019, 09:41 PM   #6
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I used blue plastic conduit for the 12V stuff and AC armored for the 120v stuff. I've been very happy with the results.
That looks amazing!


Nevermoor, I am not sure I understand the original post.
You asked about attatching conduit or (PEX) to the "interior of the exterior wall" . Then you said "Removing the inner panels to get to the existing wiring is not feasible."
So I take it to mean that you want to run the conduit on the inside skin, exposed inside the trailer. Not between the skins as shown in the beautiful photo above.
I would use the flexible conduit method shown above. Very clean installations especially if it is on the interior of your coach.
However if you have some (PEX) laying around and need to use that for an exposed run. Why not? As long as the wire/cable you are running inside of it is insulated there is no electrical reason you can't use PEX. There is just no electrical fittings, box's, etc for PEX that I know of.

Hope that helps
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Old 12-21-2019, 05:03 PM   #7
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thank you all for the feedback! i've only used metal conduit, and had no idea plastic flexible conduit was available. duh.

mark, your turquose conduit is awesome as others have stated. too bad you had to cover it up with the inside skin! a question tho, i have tried to finger the photos larger so i can see what the whitish loops are. it is present in both photos. what is it?

i appologize to you all for not being clearer in my initial entry. as batman wrote, yes, the conduit would be attached to the living side of the interior skin. i better give the pex a miss as i had not thought far enough regarding boxes, outlets, etc. for pex.

i have to say i sure dig that turquose! do you remember the company that put out that flex conduit color? it will look great with white painted interior!!!!!

di
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Old 12-21-2019, 05:45 PM   #8
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The white loops are coiled up coax.

The blue conduit is commonly called "Smurf Tube" and it's available at most Home Depot and other stores. Flex-Plus Blue ENT, is manufactured by Carlon, Cleveland, Ohio. Workers nicknamed it “smurf tube” because of its distinctive blue color.
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Old 12-21-2019, 05:59 PM   #9
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So the question still remains, “If you choke a smurf, does he turn pink?”

Sorry, couldn’t resist. Now back to the topic at hand. 🤪
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Old 12-22-2019, 08:02 AM   #10
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I thought about drilling holes to make some wire runs shorter, but it seems like the ribs are none too strong as it is. Aren't you worried about removing all that material?
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Old 12-22-2019, 06:03 PM   #11
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conduit runs

My approach was to use PVC conduit for runs through the belly pan in the areas not used for tanks and in the areas outside the frame rails. Not a fun endeavor since my 1958 outriggers are solid, not open. (Photos - frame upside down on rotisserie) More detail in my thread listed below

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PVC boxes mounted flush with sub-floor. They minimized having electrical wiring exposed under the beds or on the floor beneath cabinets.

To go up the walls I used aluminum gas line from Speedway. I used a couple different sizes, but recommend using 5/8" for all. It's flexible enough to shape and can be easily flared on the ends (flared ends to avoid sharp edges). Usually attached to vertical ribs when possible.

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Old 12-22-2019, 06:35 PM   #12
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I just celebrated my 4th week of ownership of a 1972 Sovereign 31. It is about 95% gutted. The electrical system that does exist is mess. I have been pondering the exact same scenario as you describe.
I think the product that seems most applicable is galvanized steel electrical conduit. I think It is the one that can be bent nicely with an inexpensive tool. Home Depot has a full line of boxes, junctions, plates etc. with a depth that's depth is about an inch less than conventional boxes. They would make the end system protrude less. Or the pipe could be run squarely along the floor up next to cabinetry or walls and then have the boxes extend up where needed.
Good luck with your project, keep us posted.
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Old 12-23-2019, 10:34 AM   #13
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Nothing wrong with conduit. If you have the budget and the time then do it. It will lead to less problems down the road.



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Old 12-23-2019, 01:46 PM   #14
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I thought about drilling holes to make some wire runs shorter, but it seems like the ribs are none too strong as it is. Aren't you worried about removing all that material?
I not concerned about holes in the ribs.

As I visualize it, most of the strength is in the stressed skins, and the "ribs" just serve to keep the inner and outer skins separated.
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Old 12-24-2019, 07:42 AM   #15
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I am drooling at all the images posted.

Is the metal conduit the only kind that offers junction and outlet boxes that are not as deep? My coach is a 19 footer, and every interior inch of it is prime real estate.

Thanks!
di
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Old 12-24-2019, 08:26 AM   #16
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If I were running any electrical in an airstream I would absolutely use some type of plastic conduit....it just makes too much sense to me.....
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Old 12-24-2019, 08:42 AM   #17
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I am drooling at all the images posted.

Is the metal conduit the only kind that offers junction and outlet boxes that are not as deep? My coach is a 19 footer, and every interior inch of it is prime real estate.

Thanks!
di

Carlon makes shallow blue plastic boxes that work well with the blue plastic conduit.
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Old 12-24-2019, 08:49 AM   #18
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I am drooling at all the images posted.

Is the metal conduit the only kind that offers junction and outlet boxes that are not as deep? My coach is a 19 footer, and every interior inch of it is prime real estate.

Thanks!
di

Carlon makes shallow blue plastic boxes that work well with the blue plastic conduit.

You may need to modify some of the boxes by cutting new knock-out holes to fit the snap-in or threaded adapters.

Here is a resource.
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Old 12-24-2019, 09:04 AM   #19
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The thing I love about conduit most is the ability to pull through it after the build is complete and the skins are on.

Down the road you may want to add solar or something else you did not think of or did not have the money at the time, what ever the case may be.
It is possible to add new wire to the existing conduit (provided the conduit was sized large enough).
So, instead of using 1/2" you may want to use 3/4" or even 1" for some runs for future growth or upgrades in wiring.

-Dennis
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Old 12-24-2019, 10:05 AM   #20
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Agree with Batman's comments on future changes and size. I ran 1" pvc in the belly pan and the runs close to my Multiplus and fuse panel should have been even larger. 12 gauge wire (and larger) takes up space quickly with multiple runs.
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