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Old 12-24-2009, 06:44 AM   #21
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1970 27' Overlander
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bwaysteve View Post
Russ,I am making a start on my 65.Got the couch out to find a cracked water tank and rot holes on both sides of front floor.
I am considering using a 1 1/2 in. hole saw on the elevator bolts ,lift the old off in one piece for template and remove bolts after out.Did you attempt something like this for floor removal or cut in sections?

Also I noticed,although my vinyl was in good shape, the front shell has latex over the Zolatone paint.Did you attempt to strip this also and did the Zolatone remain after stripping? Thanks,Steve

You should note that there are bolts around the perimeter of the shell that go through the "C" channel, floor and frame that you will not be able to use your hole saw on. You will have to remove the outside portion of the belly shin and cut the bolts off or to remove the nuts that hold those down.
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Old 12-24-2009, 06:46 AM   #22
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and to the Stott's, you guys are doing a great job. My wife and I are in process of a '70 Overlander that is getting to full treatment as well. It's a lot of fun and a lot of hard work but I know it will pay off...
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Old 12-24-2009, 08:57 AM   #23
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Chapin , South Carolina
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bwaysteve View Post
...cracked water tank and rot holes on both sides of front floor.
I am considering using a 1 1/2 in. hole saw on the elevator bolts ,lift the old off in one piece for template and remove bolts after out.Did you attempt something like this for floor removal or cut in sections?

Also I noticed,although my vinyl was in good shape, the front shell has latex over the Zolatone paint.Did you attempt to strip this also and did the Zolatone remain after stripping? Thanks,Steve
My water tank was also cracked, and this led to real bad rot on the front floor also. I tried the hole saw approach but found it faster to cut my floor out using the circular saw with 4 plunge cut lines around the hole. I tried to keep most of the wood around the edges still in place until I am able to replace the individual wood floor sections. I have also left the belly pan on to help keep the shell in shape. This way the shell remains somewhat supported. I will cut the edge bolts last. There are a lot of rusted screws and bolts around the edge.

My zolatone paint was covered with a dark blue latex that was uneven and peeling in spots. I didn't try any chemical strippers, I found that the pressure washer was able to remove most of it but I will still need to repaint. The zolatone paint did chip in a few small spots. If you are looking to preserve the zolatone paint you may want to try a different approach. 3000 psi pressure washer with 15 degree head seemed to work the best. It was time consuming, wet and cold. While working on it, my thoughts kept focusing around there has got to be a faster way.
Good luck, Russ
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Old 12-24-2009, 10:28 AM   #24
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Originally Posted by bwaysteve View Post
How do you plan to make a template for the floor since it appears the rear bath was rotted out? Also what was involved in removing the the bath/toilet unit.
My 65 Amb. is probably pretty close to yours.I will be following your work in the next week or so .Thanks for the pics.Steve
Steve,
Found that cardboard template wasn't all that necessary for the front. I found the radius on the front is 21.5". I used a string with a couple of loops on it to draw a nice curve. I had a small section from the front that I was able to use to compare and it was a match. The holes, I'll drill from the bottom so I don't have to worry about lining them up.

I'll be working my way back, I haven't checked the rear dimensions yet but would guess the curve to be the same.

Hope this helps,
Russ
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Old 12-24-2009, 10:40 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JSTOTT View Post
Steve,
Found that cardboard template wasn't all that necessary for the front. I found the radius on the front is 21.5". I used a string with a couple of loops on it to draw a nice curve. I had a small section from the front that I was able to use to compare and it was a match. The holes, I'll drill from the bottom so I don't have to worry about lining them up.

I'll be working my way back, I haven't checked the rear dimensions yet but would guess the curve to be the same.

Hope this helps,
Russ
You can also use the floor channel as a guide.

Andy
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Old 12-25-2009, 09:07 AM   #26
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windows

Working on the windows. Used almaloy to weld/solder the corners. Worked great on all but one of the corners I have done so far. One corner just wouldn't accept the weld. Still don't know why. The other ones went smoothly. The butyl tape was easy to do, the glass easy to put on. The glazing strip was a little tricky at first but went very smooth after I figured out a system. Found that my offset small kitchen spatula was the best tool to get it in place!
Attached a pic of my first finished window frame, not installed yet. The other is a picture of the butyl tape going on.
Jennifer
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Old 12-25-2009, 09:35 AM   #27
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I strongly recommend you cut a template of luan plywood from the cardboard template first and then cut the final ply. It is cheap and will save lots of time in the long run. It is much, much easier to handle, and much easier to "tweak". Once you get the luan fitted then use it as a pattern for the final plywood. I was working by myself and it really made the fitting easier. Expect to have to bevel the edges of the new plywood in order for it to slip into the channel all around the radius. Once you have the final fitting just right, pull it out and seal the edges, I used West System epoxy resin, covered about 10 inches from edge on top and bottom. This will prevent any moisture from attacking the core and also it makes the edge slick and very hard so it will slide into the channel much easier.

Merry Christmas
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Old 12-27-2009, 10:12 PM   #28
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Luan is a good idea and much easier to handle. I plan to route the edges with a 1/4 round to help it slide in a little better. Aircraft Spruce is nearby and I can pick up epoxy while getting some aluminum. How much epoxy did you end up using?
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Old 12-29-2009, 05:20 AM   #29
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I rounded over all the edges that go into the channel with my router, but still had to tapper sections with a belt sander to get them to slide into the channel. I bought the quart size can of epoxy and the corresponding hardner. I used the 206 hardner. Has a longer pot life and spreads better. Pick up some microballs filler while you are at Spruce cause with that you can make a peanut butter consistency mixture that is great for filling holes.
By all means, purchase the pump it for the West epoxy. It saves time, makes the mixture correct each time and is much less messy. I have used the stuff for all kinds of repair on bathroom plastic and fiberglass as well.
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Old 12-29-2009, 06:05 AM   #30
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Constavolt, it still works?

When pulling out the Constavolt the floor under it was barely in tact, the unit is very rusty and wires were everywhere. I set it on a bench and hooked it up and it worked! The DC meter worked fine and the battery check even worked after getting some silicon spray into the switch. I'm shocked... I know I'll end up replacing it eventually but this will likely be what powers the lights for the maiden voyage.

We made some additional progress, sprayed the removall (it now looks like a pink elephant), epoxied the front and rear floor panels. I needed to run the electric heater in the garage to help keep the temp up. The can says 1 quart is good for about 100 square feet on porous and 125 on non-porous. I plan to epoxy the top and bottom edges for each sheet and epoxy the whole toilet sheet (back sheet).

Fixed the wheel well on one side that had rusted through by riveting a patch with some vulcum (sp?). First chance to use my cleco's very exciting.

Russ
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Old 12-29-2009, 09:23 AM   #31
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Window repairs

Hi,
So while Russ is working on the big stuff, I have been repairing windows. Five of my windows were literally in sections. A heap of cleaning, lift off silicone remover, a lot of scraping, and a bunch of soap and water. A hard brushing with a wire brush to prep it and I was off. I tried to use Alumaloy welding rods to join the corners. Then I tried the benzomatic brand aluminum brazing/welding rods Russ found for me mixed in with his tools. Lets just say, it took some practice. I found out real quick that not enough heat and it just breaks off, too much heat and I end up with a hole in my aluminum frame (thank goodness that only happened once, fixable). My best description as to "hot enough" is when it quickly melts and seeps into the joins as you touch the rod to the metal. My husband's aluminum corner thing (pic below, oops- hubby just told me it is called a 90 degree framing clamp ) was a huge improvement on my son holding them together for me! I tried to do the backs of the frames but realized that a little on the front helped keep it much more stable. The butyl tape is easy and the glazing gasket was very easy once I figured out how to work it in. My rounded offset cake decorating spatula has a thin rounded fexible but stiff blade that was easy to work the gasket in place without damaging it. The rounded wooden handle was great to rub it all in place. I placed glass in four of them and they are ready to be installed on the camper. Just ran out of butyl tape and Vintage trailer supply is backordered, so I'll have to wait to finish. I'll start on cleaning up the mounting frame on the camper today.
By the way, I am still looking for one piece of window frame for the bottom of the front window. If anyone has one laying around and would like to sell it, please contact me.
Jennifer
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Old 12-29-2009, 11:18 AM   #32
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That's great progress. I had several of those exact type of frames cracked in the corners. I commend you for being able to weld aluminum yourself!! I didn't even attempt it, but rather took it to a friend that welded front and back, he made it look easy but I know it wasn't. I'm waiting on my VTS order too, luckily nothing is backordered, just moving across country via the brown truck at a snail's pace.
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Old 12-29-2009, 11:52 AM   #33
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Been following your thread for a couple weeks and wanted to complement your hard word. Like Scott, I'm also very impressed with your aluminum welding. I just started replacing my windows this week and got the first one back in yesterday. I have one with a broken corner weld, but I'm too much of a wimp to try that myself.
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Old 12-29-2009, 03:41 PM   #34
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Greetings from the South Side. I don't know how I missed this thread.

Great looking work, Russ & Jenn. You guys jumped right in and are makin' it happen. I'll be following along and enjoying your work!

On Edit: Forgot to mention that I did the foil bubble insulation covered with one inch of pink stuff. If I had it to do over again, I'd simply use the pink stuff without all of the expense and hassle of the foil.

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Old 12-29-2009, 04:52 PM   #35
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Yeah Jim I wondered why you hadnt talked to your fayetteville neighbors. Russ and Jen, please please please post pics of the rear end separation fix when you do it. Also make sure you have a battery in place when you try out the univolt. Not good for it(for some reason) even if you are only using shore power.
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Old 12-30-2009, 04:52 AM   #36
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Thank for the encouragement!

Thanks for the encouragement on the window welds! Funny how much a little encouragement keeps one smiling and plunging forward.
Jim and Susan, in McDonough, yeah! Glad to find fellow airstream renovators so close. Have read your blogs and never looked at the address. Good to know you are close by to compare resources and ask for advice.
Jenn and Russ
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Old 01-07-2010, 05:39 PM   #37
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65 overlander riveting progress

We got to try our hand at riveting. Lots of fun!! Probably because it is a 2 man job and requires cooperation (got my son to help in the cold). We were able to patch a couple holes and patch the fridge door access. I want to rivet everything now!

We are working on the rear door replacement. I had a friend helping me on this one. We are creating one from scratch using C-channel and some of the 0.040" aluminum. We are just waiting for the locks to come in.
Russ
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Old 01-17-2010, 07:08 AM   #38
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Fixing Tail lights

Working on fixing the tail lights. Going to use fiberglass and epoxy to try and piece it back together as recommended on some of the other forums. So far so good but it is going to take a while to piece it all together. I'm already a couple of iterations into it and still not done. I glassed the whole back and it really stiffened it up and pieces are no longer falling off. This seems like a good way to go.

Russ
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Old 01-19-2010, 02:47 PM   #39
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One fully repaired and complete window!!!

Update-
It is finally warm enough for me to get out there . My husband has been out there in the snow, rain, freezing temps, but I am a girl and hate the cold! I tried to gently pry out the glass piece that had been siliconed in by the PO and it didn't go so gracefully, but, it is out. After cleaning up the edges, I cut the glass to replace the bottom fixed window, changed the butyl tape, added the glazing strip, and only cut myself once. Then I added the bulb seal for the upper window and installed the window that I fixed indoors while it was miserable out. Worked perfectly! Always surprises me when I get it right. Picture attached. Still have to add the center screw and fix the window eyebrow that the PO bent upwards.
Jenn
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Old 01-19-2010, 03:23 PM   #40
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holy underwear!!! look at you guys go. really looked like a poop-hole in first pic, after a bath & gutting i couldn't believe it was the same trailer!!!

i might add a thought off topic;

Judging by your hubby pic, you guys look fairly young. I'm a 28y/o female.... I didn't *think* i was the usual suspect for a vintage airstream owner, but as i read these forums i see more and more young people and young families buying and reno/restoring older airstreams.

I read something the other day that the director of marketing (i think) of airstream said they were trying to appeal to a younger audience, and didn't really think they needed to appeal to the WBCCI crowd (referred to them as a bunch of retired veterans) or the vintage crowd. It is my opinion that his "young audience" is more interested in a 50 year old trailer than a brand new one....

has anyone ever done an age poll?
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