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Old 04-13-2020, 05:58 PM   #21
1 Rivet Member
 
1966 26' Overlander
Gainesville , Florida
Join Date: Apr 2020
Posts: 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikextr View Post
Its great that you have a dry place to work. I used to visit my trailer on rainy days while the inner skins were off just mark the the leaks that I couldn't find with the water hose.
That did cross my mind! Maybe after i patch the holes i can see through then i’ll roll her back out during a rain storm. Definitely want to leak test before i re-skin.
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Old 04-14-2020, 10:05 AM   #22
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1976 Argosy 24
1961 28' Ambassador
1968 26' Overlander
Lakewood , Colorado
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 113
Well, now we dive right into the meat of it... what do you plan to do with the trailer, where, how often, timeline/budget. Some of the first things you need to do affect everything about the rest of the project.
Our first Airstream (not our first trailer) was our 76 Argosy 24, basically your trailer. It was complete and original. Problem was some frame damage that was going to require some pretty major repair, but this was disclosed and reflected in the price I paid. My plan was to repair as easily and cheaply (but properly) and then camp it to see if we liked it. So, frame repair, partial floor replacement, replace all the bulkhead walls, new large gray water tank. Replace hot water heater but otherwise reused all existing appliances. Complete belly pan off, new foam board insulation, reused original axles but put on new brakes and backing plates, wheel pearing service, new tires. Many other small details.
We camped it and loved it and sold our SOB!
Hard to summarize all that work into 1 paragraph.
Mark D
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Old 04-14-2020, 10:54 AM   #23
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1976 Argosy 24
1961 28' Ambassador
1968 26' Overlander
Lakewood , Colorado
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 113
Now the current project, Airstream # 5. Three mine, 2 major repairs for quasi clients. 68 Overlander. Mostly complete trailer but totally worn out and needing everything and then some, but, good frame and straight shell. Some easy choices, yes, complete new subfloor (shell on) and what is turning out to be a complete redesign of the trailer, nothing is going to be where it was. Basics - fresh water tank, pump, gaucho in front. Water heater to streetside in front of wheel well. New compressor fridge to curbside in front of wheel well. Virtually eliminate bathroom in favor of whats really a second bedroom. Removed all wire because of a) it was aluminum and b) I didn't want it interfering with the insulation, especially in the ceiling (where Airstream loves to put all their wire).
All new wiring 110 and 12v, 110=marine 12AWG three wire (all 110 circuits are 20 amp), 12v= marine wire, 2 wire, 16 AWG for lighting (all LED) 12AWG for other accessories.Minimal wiring in ceiling and walls and that all tied closely to structural ribs. Insulation is 1/4 " closed cell foam with reflective foil bonded to each side glued to inside of shell and then 1 1/2 inch fiberglass batts with 1 side bonded foil glued to that. Both of these products are HVAC items that I buy online.A lot of the wiring is outside the wall but hidden in cabinets etc., some runs under the floor. Planning for a goodsized solar system run the 12v while boondocking which is what we mostly what we do.
As you can see this is a total rebuild, not a quick or partial repair. So many interconnected things, sometimes it seems I mock up half the trailer to see if it will all work.
Some basics, Mark D
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Old 04-14-2020, 08:38 PM   #24
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1966 26' Overlander
Gainesville , Florida
Join Date: Apr 2020
Posts: 8
The Good Stuff

I would be lying if i said I haven’t gone through a couple floor plans in my head...and then as soon as i saw the pictures of Airstream interiors, I was totally hooked. I like how these trailer show us that we don’t need 2000+ Square Feet of house to be happy. The basics are really all we need and Airstream Builders make them a little bit more heavy duty than others. I like the “Ship” feel when inside. You don’t have to take many steps to move from front to back. Not to mention your surrounded in Aircraft Aluminum, which lends a clean feeling of safety.


Now i will say, one of the first things i discovered while gawking at it one day...the windows work MUCH BETTER if you’re sitting down vs standing up. The views are gorgeous no matter where you are. Some of the other travel trailers miss this key ingredient. After doing some digging, i read that Wally wanted the driver to be able to see straight through the trailer for safety on the road...brilliant! Of course the rock guards make that a little tougher...but i like the “Why” to the window placement.

With that out of the way, my vision turned to a “lounge” atmosphere because i want people sitting down and taking a load off when they are in the trailer. If you want to stand...go outside. I will attach a quick sketch of the layout i had planned as well as some “inspiration” that i’ve found.

I have a family of 5 so we wanted to have enough space for everyone. I figured the adults could sleep in the rear queen bed, one kid on the gaucho over the street side wheel well, and the other two kids on the dinette queen bed. Outdoor propane camping shower for cleaning. Interior plumbing: foot pump vs electric water pump (open for comments here) i would love a simple electric pump setup for our 2 sinks. The plan is to be hooked up to city water and city power while we camp, but a little planning now for future boondocking scenarios wouldn’t hurt...

Captions for the pictures:

I like how the white interiors make the space seem open.

Also love the original ribs (blue outlines), mirror on the side backsplash to give the illusion of a longer counter (red), and the classic under bed storage (yellow) is simple and functional.

The bathroom pic is a cabinet/sink layout that i had seen a couple places - this should fit well in my mid-bath. That puts a huge window in the bath. Hoping to use the original stove vent for a bathroom exhaust fan!! Custom inside yet looks preserved on the outside - win win.

One TV will be mounted on the bathroom wall for the dinette (hence the TV mount picture with the metal edging) i like that look if the walls are not painted white. I have to mention the new Flying Cloud layouts. They have a mid-bath and it has a cool port hole window on the door. Such craftsmanship.

The flip up storage behind the dinette chair backs seemed very useful and a good use of space.

The kitchen sink will not be by the curbside window...thats where the 2 bar stools will be so we can enjoy the view sitting down. The gaucho sofa/bed will be another place to sit while relaxing with friends in the same area. Kids at the dinette while the adults chat in the bar/lounge area.

With all of that said, i am still figuring out the best place for the “control panel” and distribution panel. Thinking on the street side closet in the rear master...that just sounds fancy! We did not plan on having closets in the original plan.
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Old 04-16-2020, 09:32 PM   #25
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1966 26' Overlander
Urbana , Illinois
Join Date: Mar 2020
Posts: 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by SlorideFL View Post
Mark D,

Hiding the wiring behind the skins does make me nervous

Any option other than spray foam would intrigue me.
I have the same question, why DON'T people hide most of the mechanicals in the cabinets, rather than hiding them in the walls? both are equally invisable, but one is more accesible...

what are the draw backs of spray foam?

Sebastian
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Old 04-16-2020, 11:59 PM   #26
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1977 31' Sovereign
Vintage Kin Owner
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Sunset Valley , Texas
Join Date: Jul 2016
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SebastianF View Post

what are the draw backs of spray foam?

Sebastian

No one can seem to do it right as it's really hard to install and materials have changed over the years. My Avion has spray foam insulation and what I've seen of it is immaculate. Also, a very well insulated trailer, easy to maintain a comfortable level of cool in the Texas summer.
I'll likely do rock wool and reflectex on my upcoming project.

Ian
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Old 04-18-2020, 11:51 AM   #27
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1967 26' Overlander
Bugtussle , Oklahoma
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 357
Quote:
Originally Posted by SebastianF View Post
what are the draw backs of spray foam?
The main drawbacks are cost and difficulty. There are DIY spray foam kits available but I was able to find a local spray foam company that seemed excited about the project so I paid them to do it. They charged just a little more than the DIY kits would have cost and did a fine job. The contractor said that I would be able to heat my trailer with a candle and cool it with an ice cube after they finished I think he was exaggerating just a little bit.
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