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Old 10-03-2010, 09:34 PM   #21
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2003 22' International CCD
1977 31' Excella 500
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Question

My '03 22ft. Int. CCD has two small horizonal cracks on the forward curbside frame where the outriggers attach. I agree with jacking the trailer level, welding, grinding and reinforcing the frame. Has anyone considered forcing whatever size box tubing will fit between the frames, the larger the better, forward of the FW tank then weld all possible points? Any thoughts? Airstray
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Old 10-04-2010, 05:53 PM   #22
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Can I do this repair without dropping the belly pan?
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Old 10-05-2010, 09:08 AM   #23
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Can I do this repair without dropping the belly pan?
Absolutely "NO".

Both sides must be welded to be effective.

You can cut a portion of the underbelly away, and then splice it back in when the welding, grinding and plating, has been completed.

Andy
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Old 10-08-2010, 05:44 PM   #24
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Thanks to everyone for advice. Repair was done today. Took lots of pictures for everyone. I think i will do a detailed write up on the brakes, shocks, axles, cracked frame when I get some time.
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Old 10-10-2010, 07:22 PM   #25
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Whats the body like? A broken frame rail will cause stresses on the body. The roof and windows would be where i would have a look .
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Old 11-28-2010, 10:14 AM   #26
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to add a bit more to Bart’s comments:
The original frame design is marginal and over time fatigued.

Regardless of what caused the problem, stiff truck, bad axles, overloaded trailer, corrosion they all point in the same direction: failure of the C channel. The failure was at the top web of the channel where there is the greatest tension stress on a cantilevered beam. I would have hoped that the floor diaphragm would have been able to assist in taking that load but it did not.

The solution is the same regardless of the cause; increase the area of the top web of the channel (increase the section modulus). This can be done in any number of ways including the proposed fix from airstream. Note that this fix only has a top flange the bottom has been cut around the axles. Which is fine it’s the top that needs reinforcing?

Another solution would be to stitch weld a plate to the top of the channel, just eyeballing I would say a 3/16” X2.5” X 6’ plate with a 3/12 stitch. Course you could only do this when the floor is removed, and then you would have to dado a groove in the plywood floor. Anyhow this is potential solution, before being implemented it should be designed by someone well versed in dynamic loading and metal fatigue.
Wouldn’t hurt to add one also to where the tension goes to the bottom of the channel somewhere between the axle and the hitch. .

Given the number of failures I do agree with Bart’s choice of words “marginal”. I am surprised that the floor diaphragm could not contribute more the C Channel. I would also check the bolt connections to the channel, I doubt if they are sheared off (that would be really bad) but I bet they are elongated. In other words the connection between the C channel and the floor is also marginal and you might think about adding a few more bolts to there.

Well do not give up your trip in a total panic, or spent nights worrying about this. If its parked its fine!. If you are planning a trip look under the trailer above the axle how’s the Channel look, if there is a hairline you have a problem, just use the patch and go another 40 years!!

If you are remodeling then think of not waiting for this to happen do the repair while it is convenient.
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Old 11-28-2010, 11:27 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by claudebo View Post
I am surprised that the floor diaphragm could not contribute more the C Channel. I would also check the bolt connections to the channel, I doubt if they are sheared off (that would be really bad) but I bet they are elongated. In other words the connection between the C channel and the floor is also marginal and you might think about adding a few more bolts to there.
The floor itself will add almost no bending strength to the frame, because the modulus of elasticity of wood is prob. 20 or 30 times less than that of steel. In other words, the steel is so much stiffer than it will fail long before the wood takes an appreciable amount of the load.

The floor's job is to tie the shell to the frame. The amount of load sharing between the shell and the frame depends on their relative stiffnesses, and the strength of the connection between the two.

As an engineer, if I ran the zoo I'd use more of the weight budget to build a stiffer frame- but that doesn't sell as well as heavier cabinets, bigger tanks, batteries, etc. A stiffer frame reduces shell deflection, and means the frame needs to be stronger as well as stiffer.

- Bart
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