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Old 08-01-2006, 04:24 PM   #1
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2006 25' Safari
fair haven , New Jersey
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what's up with the cabinet doors?

We have a 25' 2006 Safari. Although we love our camper, we are a little concerned about the quality of the overhead cabinet doors. We have taken three trips so far, and the screws completely came out of one door (on the first trip), and the screws are coming loose on another door. We have been very gentle with the cabinets. The screws seem to be too short, and they don't hold well in the pressed wood doors.

Has anyone else had this experience? Has airstream done anything to rectify?
Thanks
Syl
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Old 08-01-2006, 04:36 PM   #2
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I also have a 2006 Ssfari but have not experienced your problem, so far anyway. Might try a slightly larger diameter screw along with a little Gorilla glue in the hole.

Greg
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Old 08-01-2006, 06:24 PM   #3
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Overhead cabinet doors

I had to tighten our overhead door located above the bed in our 2007 23' Safari. Came loose and since the bracket is slotted, the door dropped down on one end. Just had to tightened up the screws. Checked all the doors and did the same.

Larry
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Old 08-01-2006, 06:46 PM   #4
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If they get really bad you can use a fostner bit which bores a flat bottom hole and then glue in a solid wood plug and screw the hinge to it. Screws never hold well in particle board.
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Old 08-01-2006, 11:06 PM   #5
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Screwed

Yes,

We have had similar issues with srcews in our 2006 Safari 25FB SE. A few overheads and also walls and appliances. Seems as though the screws are all too small for the job in most of the areas where we experienced either a loose screw or a missing screw (found the screws on the floor later). While at the service center in Jackson Center we had them replace most of the screws with longer and larger diameter srews. The service tech pronounced the originals were both too small and overtightened.

My guess, somebody at the factory either ordered or used the wrong friggin screws. My advice...check em all...before there is not enough meat left to hold new ones in place

John
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Old 08-02-2006, 07:03 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TIMEMACHINE
My guess, somebody at the factory either ordered or used the wrong friggin screws. My advice...check em all...before there is not enough meat left to hold new ones in place

John
John,
My sentiments exactly! Thanks for the advice. The trick is going to be to get them to replace the screws BEFORE they fall out! (PS - now that you've mentioned it, we've had screws fall out in two other places - the pull on the under-couch storage and the bedroom accordian door latch - because they were too short)
Syl
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Old 08-02-2006, 08:11 AM   #7
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I have had some experience on my 3 Airstreams that makes me think that the assemblers simply grab whatever screw is handy. I replaced a lot of screws on my International 22 as undersize.

The worst example I had was a 3" screw that was inserted under the sink to attach the sink cabinet to the sliding pantry adjacent. The screw hit the drawer slide that the pantry hangs on and put an "S" curve in it. That resulted in a balky pullout pantry and finally the slide failed altogether. That's when I discovered the long screw. A proper screw would have been about 1 1/2" at the most.

I think they have a big box of assorted screws and just grab what seems appropriate.
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Old 08-02-2006, 08:23 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pahaska
I think they have a big box of assorted screws and just grab what seems appropriate.
Or what seems inappropriate, in this case. . .
Syl
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Old 08-02-2006, 08:31 AM   #9
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I had the same problem with screws coming loose in my 99 Bambi. After tightening several times and having them back out again, I put a little Loctite stud lock on the threads before reinstalling them. It solved the problem. I know that Loctite is designed for metal, but it worked fine in this case.
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Old 08-31-2007, 07:29 PM   #10
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Screws galore

Syl-
I carry a collection of wood and sheet metal screws while on the move in my 2006 Safari LS 23 footer. Being a newbie in the trailer world in 2006, I did not realize I needed to carry tool sets, glue, silicone, grease, oil, seven pounds of bolts, screws, nuts, electrical tape, duct tape, aluminum adhesive tape and ten rolls of toilet paper for the wife just to keep rolling along the highways.

In addition to upgrading those screws and bolts that seem to be popping out, unscrewing themselves on western highways, bolts and screws dropped by the factory are vibrating from their hiding places as "extras". Along with rivet ends and aluminum shavings that go into my savings account.

My top hinged curved door hinges are excellent. Almost no trouble, ever. The dresser type hinges are chronic, needing attention screws and hardware adjustment mongers. I keep a phillips and straight edge screwdriver busy after a tough days drive. By now I should be getting union wages for experience, but that will have to wait. Now it is just routine to count any loose screws on the floor as needing a home and I begin looking. Some times I need to improvise over the factory's assembly technique, but usually a better fitting screw is the answer to everyone's dream...
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Old 08-31-2007, 07:52 PM   #11
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An old trick that has worked well for me in the past is to put 1 or 2 strands of heavy monofilament fishing line in the hole. This both works as filler and a nylon locking agent. A single strand will make ordinary nuts behave much lick a nylok nut. You probably have some around anyway. It’s a great first shot.

Vaughan
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Old 08-31-2007, 10:12 PM   #12
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If you use glue then coat the screws with a thin coating of vasaline. You will never get the screws out if you don't.
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Old 09-01-2007, 06:42 AM   #13
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After 5000 miles of travel no sign of any problems with loose or too-short screws on our unit yet...
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Old 08-15-2008, 08:33 AM   #14
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Problem with quality of construction on 2006 Safari

We purchased a new 2006 in the fall of 2007; had been sitting on the dealers lot the whole time - not used. We LOVE the layout and have fallen in love with this camper. On our second trip the kitchen cabinet door screws popped out and had to be replaced; on the third trip the pantry door came open while traveling, the pantry door panel came off entirely, and we had items scattered throughout the trailer. We have ALWAYS been ultra-careful to ensure do a final check prior to hitting the road, ensuring that all cabinets are tightly closed and feel 'locked' just to avoid such a thing. In both cases, the screws for the door assemblies were woefully short for the job. Although our camper was fixed under warrantee by the nearest dealer, this was very disappointing in a trailer that we always envisioned as the top-line in terms of quality. Now my husband has added hardware on either side of the problem (or potential problem) doors so we can bungee them during travel. Looks a bit silly, but beats having the doors pop off the hinges or door panels shaking off totally while traveling. I'm hoping that on this next trip - our fourth, we will not experience any more factory-caused malfunctions.
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Old 08-15-2008, 09:37 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lmgreenfield View Post
I'm hoping that on this next trip - our fourth, we will not experience any more factory-caused malfunctions.
After 3 Airstreams, I am totally convinced that the nails and screws are simply whatever the assembler happens to pick up at the moment, regardless of the design (if any).

In my Classic 25, I had a 3" screw (that should have been about 1 1/2") that deformed the pantry track and finally led to a failure that dumped tghe pantry in the aisle. I have had a number of too-short screws. In the 25, I had the spice rack disintegrate on a rough road and found that the nails were too short and only had about a 1/8" penetration. I e-mailed the factory, but never received a reply.

Fortunately, in 2 years, I have found very little to complain about in my 2007 Classic 28.
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Old 08-15-2008, 11:55 AM   #16
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Reading these posts I am inclined to think that Airsteam quality has been steadily eroding to where quality in todays product is questionable.

Seems that earlier trailers were much better finished and contained lots of real wood.
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Old 08-15-2008, 04:43 PM   #17
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Same-o problem with loose screws...

This trick worked for us..

Elmers white wood glue, flat tooth picks. Coat the picks one at a time and
insert thin end in hole until filled, let dry, break off excess, coat screw with same glue and re-install.

ps..they will come out if you need to remove them, also re-tighten well
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Old 08-16-2008, 05:17 AM   #18
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Thanks for the responses

Quote:
Originally Posted by ShikariJones View Post
Reading these posts I am inclined to think that Airsteam quality has been steadily eroding to where quality in todays product is questionable.

Seems that earlier trailers were much better finished and contained lots of real wood.
Makes one wonder whether all the folks who are purchasing and refurbishing the older models are really getting the better deal than those of us with newer models (apart from the thrill of seeing their Airstream re-born).

Despite those problems, I still think our camper is better than all the white boxes we've looked at in the past! Just wish the factory had a greater sense of pride in their product, as they apparently did in the past. Liga
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Old 08-16-2008, 06:48 AM   #19
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We have an '82. It's one of the "older" units you speak about with few screws to begin with and no particle board, but we have a few srews holding a mirror on the wall, etc. We had problems with the mirror screws and would find rivets on the floor that had broken and fell from the ceiling. Once we had a cabinet front fall off enroute. I read posts from Inland Andy and others about how important it is to keep the entire running gear proberly balanced. We installed Centramatic balancers and now don't find the rivets or loose screws.

Now, I'm not suggesting everyone go out and put on Centramatic balancers just to stop the screw problem. I know Pahaska well and if he says they are the wrong size, then you can well bet they are the wrong size, but our trailers shake themselves to death if the tire, wheel, and hubs are not all balanced. There aren't many places that can do that thus the centramatic balancer installation for us as we use our trailer probably a lot more than most. We put on almost 10,000 miles last summer touring Canada and every Western state. It goes somewhere every month even through the winter and then stays on the road all summer. In our situation, the Centramatics paid off.

That may also beone reason that Pahaska's 28' is holding together better than his previous two trailers as he also is running Centramatic balancers on his 28' Classic.
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Old 08-16-2008, 10:45 AM   #20
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Airstream unhindges on the road!

My wife and I travel more unpaved road in a year, than most Airstream owners can imagine traveling in a life time. Any weaknesses in design, engineering or parts unsuitable for travel on roads that are not silky smooth are found immediately.

I carry an assortment of wood and sheet metal screws that can be bought at any hardware store for "replacement upgrades". The screws are in plastic containers with 8 to 12 sizes.

To save the hinges we found a simple cure. Nylon rope. Other than the pantry, the doors and drawers are secured by rope while we travel. Even the storage door hinge below the bed was adapted with a sliding door lock, set at an angle so the bolt does not vibrate open while moving. For extra security a rubber band is used to prevent this door from swinging open.

Fresh fruit in the refrigerator are placed in the netted styrafoam protection that comes with Costco's Asian Pears and the Apples kept in the clear plastic containers. Eggs remain in the styrafoam carton. Glass bottles are never in the front door shelves while moving to prevent breaking glass containers on a rough road. Watermelon travel fine on the bed, believe it or not! We have not had a melon get loose on the steepest roads of the Rockies.

After three years we have a sequence of door hinge checks when camp is set up. the hinges need to be tightened regularly, but is just a fact of life on the road. When we explained to the RV sales people that we were moving from tent camping to needing a sturdy trailer, they pulled out the Airstream literature showing caravans running the deserts and mountains. The Airstream is probably 70% of this image in reality, at 200% the cost.

Am I dissatisfied with the Airstream? No. But... when we are ready to step into a 25 footer, there will be a list of immediate changes and upgrades done before I feel it is off-road-worthy.
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