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Old 10-22-2005, 09:00 AM   #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 3Ms75Argosy
did you get the 1/8th" ply to bend on that art project that you did? Is there just a curved frame (without studs) that the ply is screwed to? Did you steam the wood first? Looks fantastic! How did it look finished?
Awesome work!
Marc
The baltic birch will curve around a frame like that with no steam - it is quite strong and flexible, probably down to about a 10" radius or so. I cut a circle, than another circle like a rabbet (if you know what that means) inside the first and clamped the plywood to the inner circle and screwed. It was a little more complex because I wanted that figure eight shape, but basically just careful cutting with a router. I used two layers of the 1/8" ply for strength. I usually use paste wax on birch as it isn't so great with oil, blotchy. For my interior though I am going to poly, I just want a little more protection in that potentially damp enviroment.
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Old 10-25-2005, 02:51 PM   #42
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Wood Endcap Installation

I put in the rear endcap and general area today... here are some pictures. It looks nice, warm in color which will help over the next few months as it turns grey here. It was a bit of a job getting everything lined up and now I am pretty sure I don't want to punch holes in that area for the above-window shelf with lights that I had planned. The wood rivets nicely and is quite solid. I used cork spacers for part of this installation, they work well with the wood, but I am not sure I would use them for an aluminum interior, it compresses just a bit and the aluminum might not have enough stiffness to stay relatively flat.
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Old 10-25-2005, 04:29 PM   #43
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Carlos,

Did you save the patterns by any chance? I might do this on my , ah, err, next project........
Looks great!
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Old 10-25-2005, 04:45 PM   #44
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Originally Posted by uwe
Carlos,

Did you save the patterns by any chance? I might do this on my , ah, err, next project........
Looks great!
I'll save them, if it all works out I'm sure someone will want to use them at some point... The front end is a different shaped curve I think so I might have to make another set over the next few days...

C
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Old 10-26-2005, 06:50 AM   #45
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bravo! this looks awesome! i agree with not wanting to punch holes in it. it's got a nice, clean finished look as it is now. are you planning on doing the side walls with the same wood treatment? BEAUTIFUL work, man! i love it!

jp
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Old 10-27-2005, 11:33 PM   #46
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Quote:
Originally Posted by A-Merry-Can
bravo! this looks awesome! i agree with not wanting to punch holes in it. it's got a nice, clean finished look as it is now. are you planning on doing the side walls with the same wood treatment? BEAUTIFUL work, man! i love it!

jp
Yes, the wood will cover everything interior... I am on the front endcap now which is seeming easier - there is a little trick to installing the panels that I figured out on the rear, I will detail this later with some pictures. Though the front cap is only 3' deep and the rear is 4' I think the same templates are going to work with just a little more overlapping in places.

Thanks for the kind words - what a solitary exercise this would be without this site, no?

Carlos
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Old 10-31-2005, 03:18 PM   #47
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Carlos,
The wood caps look nice although I must confess my tape measure is a bit rusty and difficult to read.
Your airstream is really coming along beautifully. It's nice checking out your progress.
Theresa
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Old 11-02-2005, 03:16 PM   #48
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Wood Install Pictures

I've been working on my interior wood skin - here are some new pictures:

I feel quite certain at this point that the wood will have more than enough strength to substitute for the aluminum interior skin.

I used a couple different boards on this front cap to make it look striped. I was worried that the places where the wood overlapped and created a gap would be ugly, but I think they look fine, a kind of organic shape to the gap... I buck rivetted a bit around the door to make sure this would work (buck rivetting wood) and it is fine as well. I might make some kind of trim ring for the door or I might just leave it like this. Rivets will go in first, then I will cut and sand the wood back to the door - this will keep the ply from splintering at the edges.

One picture is of the back cap - you can see how the facets reflect the light.

I am hoping to have the walls in by this weekend - it is a little slow going as I have to figure out where to punch the wires through the walls as I install.
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Old 11-02-2005, 04:04 PM   #49
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Wow very nice - I guess I stand corrected - I was the one who thought that wood may not have the strength similar to the original alum.

Ken J.
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Old 11-02-2005, 05:06 PM   #50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken J
Wow very nice - I guess I stand corrected - I was the one who thought that wood may not have the strength similar to the original alum.

Ken J.
Ken,

I wouldn't say corrected... I think yours is a valid concept - I just think this particular kind of wood in this particular application will be sufficient... I am not sure how I would feel about removing the alum. skin on a longer trailer. The frame, it seems to me, does relatively more work on a shorter trailer. As the trailer gets longer and longer there is more and more length (and weight) in front of and behind the axle. Before getting to this point I also added some metal to my frame making it a bit stiffer and have stronger wood on the floor (further stiffening the frame) than factory. I replaced outside skin metal (stock .032) with .040.

I don't know of anyone else that thinks this is a good idea (removing the interior aluminum) so you are in the majority...

Carlos
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Old 11-06-2005, 07:53 PM   #51
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My interior skin installation is progressing, if slowly. Yesterday I finished the "lower level" of wood and today I have been thinking about the big hole I have to punch through the ceiling for my stove-pipe. I set up the things that I do have in the space (which make for a funny picture) to finalize where the stove will go. It will be pretty much centered on the curb side counter. I hope this will make for even heating. I put a picture of my hand in one shot to show how tiny this stove is.

A double layer of wood around the wires coming through the wall should act something like a grommet - the edges are sanded. They look pretty neat, though I think they will all be hidden from view.
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Old 11-06-2005, 08:02 PM   #52
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Carlos,
Did you mention which type of wood you were using? It looks really nice. I might go look for it to use for my cabinet door skins. I like the figure in the grain.
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Old 11-06-2005, 08:04 PM   #53
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After getting the stove where I wanted it, I used a plumb line to figure where to put this hole in the roof and drilled one tiny little hole through to the sky.

My father has a lathe in his shop and I turned a fitting for my roof from white oak. This wood fitting will attach to the roof with screws from below - and then a threaded "deck fitting" will screw to the wood on the outside. The deck fitting has a nice looking chrome stovepipe for cold weather and a threaded cap with rubber seal for driving and summer. I like the idea of being able to remove the stove pipe for travel, I imagine tearing it off on a low branch...

After turning the wood fitting I used a bandsaw, belt sander, and finally rasp to make the piece conform to the roof. Tomorrow I will put it up there and cut a 6" hole in my roof! Yikes! On the inside I will put fireproof insulation between the skins for a radius of 12 inches or so and some aluminum trim/shielding over the wood as it nears the pipe. There will be gap between the wood and the pipe so that air can circulate for cooling.

Also, a picture of the water fill I am going to use for the fresh water tank - a boat fitting as well. My feeling, after doing a lot of searching for components like this, is that boat stuff is really nice.. and really expensive.
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Old 11-06-2005, 08:17 PM   #54
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Quote:
Originally Posted by uwe
Carlos,
Did you mention which type of wood you were using? It looks really nice. I might go look for it to use for my cabinet door skins. I like the figure in the grain.
Uwe, this is baltic birch ply, 1/8" - it comes in 1/4 as well, up to 1". 5'x5' sheets and a funny little insignia on the back that looks kind of cyrillic but is maybe Finnish?

I like the figure in the grain too - I don't know if I just got lucky, but most every sheet was interesting in some way. I saved some polka dot looking pieces for the ceiling. The back part is "bookmatched" - symmetrical figuring in the cap piece - but I don't know if it will really be visible, it is kind of subtle.

By the way, I'll send off those old vents to you tomorrow.

Carlos
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Old 11-06-2005, 08:36 PM   #55
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Carlos

I just saw the respose to my earlier comment - putting thinker skin on the outside seems to me to be a good thing - it would add to the overall stiffness. I agree (I had an 18 footer) that a smaller trailer does not flex as much - this 26 footer of mine really flexes........ whats interesting it has the exact same frame (except longer) as my 18 did. So between the beefed up frame and thicker skin - you should be in great shape. You'll have to let us know after you get some miles on how things are holding up - one thing non-airstream restorers are saying is that the vintage airstreams are too "cold" inside - you seems to be solving that issue.............

Ken J
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Old 11-07-2005, 07:46 PM   #56
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Charlie Noble up top

The 'stack is on top after today, I will spare the forum the pictures of the hole-cutting in progress, a ragged 6 inch gash in the roof of my 'stream.

After that (and a lot of rasping on the wood fitting to get it to conform nicely) I doubled up the skin where the fittings will sit and evened up the hole with a file from the inside, screwed on the wood fitting and screwed the metal fitting to the wood fitting. Screwed in the smokestack and looks pretty good - very solid and level.

On the inside, the 3" stovepipe will slip up into the finned heat sink. I will step the interior skin an additional inch away from the pipe (there will be about 2" clearance around the pipe), insert a metal sheild, and pack fire resistant insulation between the skins to protect my meltable foil bubble insulation. I think making this shield will be a little tricky. A good job for tomorrow.
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Old 11-07-2005, 08:30 PM   #57
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Thats impressive! Can't wait to see the finished product.
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Old 11-11-2005, 01:53 PM   #58
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Wood

The skins are finally in - I will finish up the rivetting and put on the final coat of poly next. Then floor.

The door has a trim of 1" aluminum around the edge, the windows and vents will have the same.
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Old 11-11-2005, 06:47 PM   #59
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Carlos,
Spectacular!
Can you tell me your source for the Water Fill Fitting?
Thanks,
Mark
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Old 11-11-2005, 09:01 PM   #60
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Water Fill

Mark:

Water fill source - pricey but very solid - the cap is attached to the fitting with a little chain and has a rubber seal on the inside:

http://www.sailboatstuff.com/plumb_deckfill.html

If you do a google search for "deck fill" you will find some other alternatives.
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